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VCE Systems Engineering

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Presentation on theme: "VCE Systems Engineering"— Presentation transcript:

1 VCE Systems Engineering 2013 - 2017
Implementation Briefings, May and June, 2012 This PowerPoint was delivered to teachers at VCE Systems Engineering Implementation Briefings in May and June 2012. This Power Point is a preliminary introduction to the new study design. Any queries about the study or this presentation should be directed to Lorraine Tran, Curriculum Manager, Technologies, VCAA A summary of changes to the study is published in the July 2012 VCE Bulletin Supplement. The revised Systems Engineering study design Units 1-4 is to be implemented in 2013. The new study design is the mandated VCE Systems Engineering curriculum. It is the teachers’ reference for planning and writing the VCE Systems Engineering course content from 2013 for all Units 1-4.

2 © Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority 2007
The copyright in this PowerPoint presentation is owned by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority or in the case of some materials, by third parties. No part may be reproduced by any process except in accordance with the provisions of the Copyright Act 1968 or with permission from the Copyright Officer at the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority.

3 Systems Engineering Implementation Briefing
VCE Systems Engineering Units 1–4 Accreditation period 2013–2017 Implementation Workshops 2012 The Systems Engineering Study Design is distinctively marked with accreditation period on the front cover. The study design was uploaded to the VCAA website in February The VCAA is no longer distributing hard copies of study designs to schools. NOTE: The new study and accompanying resources is on a separate page of the VCAA website to avoid confusion with the current Systems Engineering study design which is accredited until the end of 2012. 

4 Goals for the workshop Introduce the new VCE Systems Engineering Study Design (2013–2017) Highlight the differences between new study design and the current study design Review draft assessment criteria for the School- assessed Task and extract of the draft Assessment Handbook Provide implementation ideas and opportunity for discussion/questions The purpose of this presentation is to: introduce and familiarise teachers with the new Systems Engineering Study Design and provide some teaching ideas and resources to assist in its implementation. highlight differences between the new study and the current study. provide an opportunity to discuss and provide feedback on assessment of the new study. provide an opportunity to ask any questions about the study design. These will be published, as Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) in a future VCAA Bulletin and on the VCAA website. It is important to make use of the networks and gain support from colleagues. Systems Engineering teachers can use digital technology to access available resources available for example, through the subject association (DATTA Vic), existing networks, and mailing lists such as the VCE syseng mailing list. Teachers can register at: <www.edulists.com.au>.

5 The Review Process Review occurred during 2011
Panel comprised teachers from Independent, Catholic and Victorian Government schools, tertiary educators, and two engineers Terms of reference guided the review Consultation draft made available for stakeholder feedback All feedback considered by review committee During 2011 the Systems Engineering Study had a major review. The review was guided by the Terms of reference. The consultation draft of the study was made available on the VCAA website and stakeholders were invited to provide feedback. Two independent reviewers provided feedback. All feedback was carefully considered by the Review Committee and changes were made to the final version of the Systems Engineering Study Design. The draft and the final version of the study design were approved by various VCAA committees and the VRQA.

6 Contents Teachers should thoroughly familiarise
themselves with the study design including: Introduction (page 6) Structure (page 7) Safety (page 8) Assessment and reporting (pages 10–11) Cross study specification (page 12) Units 1–4 (pages 13–34) Advice for teachers (pages 35–64) Glossary (pages 43–47) Teachers need to be aware of changes to the study, become familiar with the content of the new study design and begin planning for implementation in 2013. The Introduction (starting on page 6) includes: Scope of the study – describes the field of Systems Engineering. Rationale for the study – provides reasons why the study has a valid place in the senior school curriculum. Aims – on page 7 describe what students should know and be able to do as a result of studying this subject. The Structure section indicates that the study design comprises four units, each with distinctive content. Entry requirements state that it is beneficial for students to have done some preparatory work if they enter Units 3 and 4 without having done Units 1 and 2. The duration of scheduled classroom instruction for each unit and updated safety information can be found on page 8. Please note carefully the information on use of machinery and electrical safety. Teachers are reminded about their duty of care to students undertaking this study particularly in relation to hazardous substances, equipment and processes. Assessment and reporting information is on pages 10–11. Further information about assessment is provided later in this presentation. The Cross study specification is new and on page 12. Content of Units 1–4 is on pages 13–34. The ‘Advice for teachers’ section is on pages 35–64 and includes a revised glossary of terms applicable to the study design on pages 43–47.

7 General changes Cross study specification – applies to all units
Change of structure, there are no specified research outcomes in Units 1 and 2; Systems Engineering Process is applied across outcomes New unit and Area of study titles and changes in content in the areas of study Greater clarity in the key knowledge and key skills Elaboration of some content including lists of formula and types of components The main changes are: The Cross study specification which includes the Systems Engineering Process has been introduced. There is a structural change to the study. The Systems Engineering Process forms the basis of what students will do in Units 1 and 2. There are no research outcomes (in the current study, these are Outcome 3). The theory component that was the focus of Outcome 1 in Units 1 and 2 is now integrated into Outcome 1 in the new study that incorporates the use of Systems Engineering Process. Titles of units and Areas of study have been changed to reflect the new content. The content of the Areas of study have also been changed. The key knowledge and key skills have greater clarity making it easier for teachers to see what has to be covered. The key knowledge is more explicit, for example in terms of providing formula that has to be covered, lists of components, concepts and principles. The focus on the type of system for each unit is the same as the current study, that is: mechanical systems in Unit 1, electrical/electronic systems in Unit 2, and integrated and controlled systems in Units 3 and 4.

8 Scope of the study (page 6)
Design, creation, operation and evaluation of systems Meeting intended goals of systems design through alternatives, concepts, trial-and-error, trade-offs, and testing, verifying, evaluating Applications of the field of systems engineering in manufacturing, transportation, robotics, energy management Consideration of sustainability of systems Use of project management for efficiency and systems optimisation The Scope of the study is new and outlines the field of Systems Engineering. Key points from the Scope of the study are included above and are integral to understanding and developing systems. The scope also describes the areas of application of systems engineering.

9 Rationale (page 6) Rationale of the study makes explicit:
Innovative systems thinking and problem solving through the use of the Systems Engineering Process Engaging practically and purposefully to gain understanding and appreciation of systems Project management including designing, planning, fabricating, testing and evaluating Providing pathways to study and work in related fields The Rationale on page 6 provides valid reasons for the inclusion of Systems Engineering in the VCE. Systems Engineering provides opportunities for students to develop innovative systems thinking, problem solving, project management skills and understanding and appreciating systems through practical and purposeful engagement. The study has been recognised as providing useful underpinning knowledge and skills for a number of occupations in fields including and related to engineering and manufacturing.

10 Aims (page 7) Eight aims in the study design include
Understanding of the Systems Engineering process and influencing factors Concepts and skills in design, construction, fault finding, diagnosis, performance analysis, maintenance, modification and control Knowledge and application of mechanical and electrical/electronic and control systems The 13 aims in the current study design have been condensed into eight in the new study design. These aims articulate what students should know and be able to do as a result of studying Systems Engineering. They are summarised in this and the next slide.

11 Aims continued (page 7) Understand how technologies solve challenges and transform lives Develop knowledge of new developments and innovations Develop problem solving and project management skills and safe use of tools, equipment, materials and processes, including risk assessment Awareness of quality and standards, systems reliability, safety and fitness for intended purpose

12 Cross study specification: Systems Engineering Process (page 12)
The Cross study specification includes the Systems Engineering Process (refer to the diagram on page 12 of the Systems Engineering Study Design). The Systems Engineering Process is referred to in each unit of the study. The Systems Engineering Process describes the process that students will use when they develop a system. It comprises a number of stages for managing and developing a project. It recognises a starting and end point, with opportunities to continuously re-evaluate progress, make and document modifications.

13 Systems Engineering Process and factors that influence design, planning, production and use
Function Safety Costs User needs and requirements Materials Components Environment of use Minimisation of waste and energy use Embedded into the Systems Engineering Process is consideration of the factors that influence the design, planning, production and use of the system. These are listed on page 12 of the study design and include: function; user needs and requirements; appropriate materials and components; environment of use (where the system will be used); safety; minimisation of waste and energy use; and associated costs. Page 39 of the Advice for teachers describes these factors and why they are important considerations. Students will need to incorporate these influencing factors as they work through the Systems Engineering Process. They will need to comment in their final evaluation on how they incorporated these influencing factors throughout the Systems Engineering Process. Students could be asked questions in the Unit 3/4 examination about the Systems Engineering Process and the influencing factors. Students must consider these factors, but there are others that could also be relevant; these are listed as ‘additional factors’ on page 40 of the Advice for teachers. These are: quality standards, styling and appearance, performance and durability, size, maintenance, production methods and regulations. Whether these should be included will depend on the system to be developed.

14 Systems Engineering process mapped to outcomes in each unit
Unit 1 Outcome 1 Unit 2 Outcome 1 Unit 3 Outcome 1 Unit 1 Outcome 2 Unit 2 Outcome 2 Unit 4 Outcome 1 This slide shows the relationship between the Systems Engineering Process and the Outcomes in Units 1–4. Students will commence the three initial stages of the Systems Engineering process in Outcome 1 of Units 1, 2 and 3; In Unit 3, students can also commence production in Outcome 1. They will complete the production, test and evaluate the system in Outcome 2 in Units 1 and 2 and in Outcome 1 in Unit 4.

15 Activity – fish bone diagram or grid
Electric bike power generator steel tubing, plates and bar, sheet metal, wood, bicycle, sealed acid battery, paint, rubber, light bulbs, ultracapacitor, power inverter, 24 volt DC magnetic motor, rheostat resistor, switches, holders, 8 gauge wire, battery clamps, alternator pulley, belt, cable ties, multimeter, clear plastic, cigarette lighter socket “I built an electric bike power generator to produce an integrated system that converts mechanical energy from human effort into electrical energy. The operator can therefore gain a good supply of electrical energy and benefit from exercising at the same time”. Refer to the speaker notes for instructions. Copy and paste the following link into your browser for the activity print-out/support material. Seven Ablahad, Penola Catholic College, 2012 Top Designs Exhibition Using the accompanying support material fishbone graphic organiser or grid, identify aspects the student would need to have considered in relation to the factors that influence design, planning, production and use of the electric bike power generator system: function, user needs and requirements, appropriate materials and components, environment of use, safety, minimisation of waste and energy use and associated costs. Copy and paste the following link into your browser for the activity print-out/support material.

16 Structure of the study design
Four units: Units 1–4 now have two areas of study; Systems Engineering Process is embedded in each unit. Unit 1: Introduction to mechanical systems Area of Study 1 – Fundamentals of mechanical system design Area of Study 2 – Producing and evaluating mechanical systems Unit 2: Introduction to electrotechnology systems Area of Study 1 – Fundamentals of electrotechnology system design Area of Study 2 – Producing and evaluating electrotechnology systems This slide and the next shows the structure of the study design. Each unit now has two rather than three Areas of study, and therefore two outcomes. The new titles of the units and Areas of study are shown above and on the next slide.

17 Structure of the study design Units 3 and 4
Unit 3: Integrated systems engineering and energy Area of study 1 – Controlled and integrated systems engineering design Area of study 2 – Clean energy technologies Unit 4: Systems control and new and emerging technologies Area of study 1 – Producing, testing and evaluating integrated technological systems Area of study 2 – New and emerging technologies The titles of Units 3 and 4 and the Areas of study are shown on this slide.

18 Advice for teachers This section includes advice on:
employability skills (pages 35–37) developing a course (page 37) explanation on the Cross study specification and factors influencing design, planning production and use of a system (pages 38–40) risk management (page 40) suggested systems themes and projects for each unit (page 41) References will be made to the Advice for teachers during this presentation. The Advice for teachers contains useful information as shown in this slide and the next, to support implementation of the study.

19 Advice for teachers (continued)
explaining specific terms used throughout the study design (glossary, pages 43–47 ) equipment requirements for the study (page 47) unit by unit learning activities for each outcome (pages 48–67): note these are not assessment tasks sample Units 3 and 4 delivery schedule (week by week) to assist teachers in their planning (pages 60–62) sample assessment program (pages 63–64) Further contents included in the Advice for teachers are shown in this slide.

20 Purpose of the key knowledge and key skills
Each unit comprises: Introduction to the unit: an overview of the content to be studied in the unit. Introduction to each area of study: contextual information; this can be used to plan content. Outcome statements: what students are expected to achieve as a result of completing the unit. Key knowledge: this is the content students should know by the end of the unit. Key skills: these are the skills students need to apply. The key skills are related to the key knowledge that can be used to address or demonstrate the outcome. These vary in their level of cognitive demand (Bloom’s taxonomy). Teachers need to read the whole of the unit in conjunction with the Cross study specification when they are planning teaching and learning activities. When planning assessments, refer to the study design to ensure tasks cover content appropriately and are pitched at the right level.

21 Introduction to mechanical systems
Unit 1 Introduction to mechanical systems As in the current study design, the focus of this unit is on mechanical components, systems, their design and construction. The system that students design and make should be mainly mechanical, but may contain some electronic components. Also covered in this unit is energy and energy conversions required to operate systems. Note that pneumatics and hydraulics does not need to be covered. Suitable themes and projects for Unit 1 are listed on page 41.

22 Unit 1: Area of Study 1 – Fundamentals of mechanical system design (pages 13–17)
Outcome 1 Describe and use basic engineering concepts, principles and components, and using selected relevant aspects of the Systems Engineering Process, design and plan a mechanical or an electro-mechanical system. When looking at page 14 of the study design you will see that the function and operation of mechanical components have been grouped for like-types of components, for example types of gears. Similarly, mechanical engineering concepts and principles have also been grouped, for example, ratios; motion. Also note that the mechanical calculations and measurements for this unit are included in the key knowledge. Students will need to understand how a mechanical system will perform as a result of changing (or substituting) components or subsystems. Covered in this Area of study are input, process, output diagrams used to symbolically represent mechanical systems. Students will also need to learn about open and closed loop systems. The Systems Engineering Process (see page 12 of the study design) is introduced along with the factors that influence design, planning, production and use of a mechanical system. Students will use the first three stages of the Systems Engineering Process to demonstrate this outcome. The Mechanical and electrotechnology formula and worked examples will be a useful resource to support the teaching of this outcome. These formula sheets can be accessed on the Systems Engineering page of the VCAA website in the Support Material section. A number of the terms used in this outcome are listed in the glossary starting on page 43.

23 Unit 1: Area of Study 2 – Producing and evaluating mechanical systems (pages 15–16)
Outcome 2 Make, test and evaluate a mechanical or an electro-mechanical system using selected relevant aspects of the Systems Engineering Process. In this outcome, students will produce, test and evaluate the system they designed and planned in Outcome 1. These are the last three stages of the Systems Engineering Process. Students can model their design or develop a prototype to test aspects of their chosen design. This outcome includes risk assessment and safe use of tools and equipment. Students will need to document their processes, for example by taking and annotating digital photographs that they annotate. This outcome also includes testing and modifying the system to achieve optimum performance. It also includes students responding to criteria they have developed, which includes how they have applied the Systems Engineering Process and how the factors that influence design, planning, production and use of the system have been taken into account.

24 Introduction to electrotechnology systems
Unit 2 Introduction to electrotechnology systems As in the current study design, the focus of this unit is on electrical and electronic (electrotechnology) components, systems, their design and construction. The system that students design and make should be mainly electrical/electronic, but may contain some mechanical components. Also introduced in this unit is the use of microcontrollers and microelectronic circuitry. Students should be exposed to some of the new advances in control technology. Suitable themes and projects for Unit 2 are provided in the Advice for teachers on page 41.

25 Unit 2: Area of Study 1 – Fundamentals of electrotechnology system design (page 18)
Outcome 1 Investigate, represent, describe and use basic electrotechnology and basic control engineering concepts, principles and components, and using selected relevant aspects of the Systems Engineering Process, design and plan an electrotechnology system. In Outcome 1, students are introduced to the principles and elements of operational electrotechnology systems. Covered in this unit are the function and operation of electrical/electronic components which are listed on page 19. Components include super or ultra capacitors. Specific components of similar types are clearly listed, for example, switches, resistors and diodes. The concepts and principle and reference material, such as the resistor colour code are also included. Students will also be expected to make electrical calculations. They also need to be able to symbolically represent both the components and electronic systems and sub-systems in circuit schematic diagrams, block diagrams and flow charts. The Table of electronic symbols and the Mechanical and electrotechnology formula and worked examples will be useful resources to support the teaching of this outcome. These resources can be accessed on the Systems Engineering page of the VCAA website in the Support Material section. This outcome also includes use of simulation and demonstration software to represent and demonstrate electronic principles. Students will work through the first three stages of the Systems Engineering Process. This includes describing the factors that influence the design, planning, production and use of their intended system. Students will also develop evaluation criteria for the finished system, a workplan and list of components and materials using appropriate communication methods. A number of the terms used in this outcome are listed in the glossary starting on page 43.

26 Unit 2: Area of Study 2 – Producing and evaluating electrotechnology systems (page 20)
Outcome 2 Make, test and evaluate an electrotechnology system, using selected relevant aspects of the Systems Engineering Process. In this outcome, students will produce, test and evaluate the electrotechnology system they designed and planned in Outcome 1. To demonstrate this outcome they will be applying the last three stages of the Systems Engineering Process. This outcome includes risk assessment and safe use of tools and equipment. They will need to use measuring and testing equipment, such as a multimeter, and understand what happens when components are substituted in an eletrotechnology system. They will need to perform fault finding and diagnostic procedures. This outcome also includes how the system can be produced to achieve quality for its intended purpose. It also includes students responding to criteria they developed earlier, which includes how they have applied the Systems Engineering Process and whether the factors that influence design, planning, production and use of the system have been taken into account. Students also need to suggest how they could further improve the system.

27 Integrated systems engineering and energy
Unit 3 Integrated systems engineering and energy As in the current study, students will collect ideas, investigate/research and plan a sustantial, operational, mechanical-electrotechnology integrated and controlled system which will be completed over Units 3 and 4. In this unit, students will also learn about technologies for harnessing energy, both renewable and non-renewable. Consider whether students could design a system related to renewable energy, to tie the two areas of study together. Suitable systems for this unit are listed in the Advice for teachers on page 42.

28 Unit 3: Area of Study 1 – Controlled and integrated systems engineering design (page 23)
Outcome 1 Investigate, analyse and use advanced mechanical-electrotechnology integrated and control systems concepts, principles and components, and using selected relevant aspects of the Systems Engineering Process, design, plan and commence construction of an integrated and controlled system. This outcome includes and combines content from Outcome 1 in Units 1 and 2. However, the focus is on the integration of mechanical and electronic systems and sub-systems including their control. Diagrammatic representation and performance calculations are included in this outcome. There is additional content in Unit 3 not included in Outcome 1 in Units 1 and 2. This includes: Mechanical engineering concepts and principles compound gear ratios basic hydraulic and pneumatic systems, pneumatic and hydraulic pressure Newton’s first, second and third laws of motion Mechanical calculations total gear ratio power energy pressure moments about a point action and reaction forces and torque Function and operation of electrical/electronic components specific mention of AC and DC component mounting techniques fuses (added to relays and solenoids) thermistors (temperature variable) added to resistors list bridge and zener diodes added to diodes list fixed and variable voltage regulators phototransistors liquid crystal displays wound armatures motors input transducer and control devices: microphones, speakers and audio transducers and piezo buzzers aerial or antenna and earth connection Electrical/electronic concepts and principles component data sheets digital and analogue signals and data storage logic gates and truth tables: NOT, AND, NAND, OR, NOR, XOR Electrical calculations and their measurement frequency resistor networks: resistors in series, resistors in parallel capacitor networks: capacitors in parallel, capacitors in series diagrammatic and symbolic representation (already mentioned) – second last dot point of key knowledge How teachers decide to cover the theoretical component may vary. Suggestions are provided in the Learning Activities suggested in the Advice for teachers on pages An approach that allows for the combination of theoretical understanding with practical application is highly desirable. There is no longer a requirement to set a separate SAC task as there is for Outcome 1 in the current study design. Teachers are reminded that examination questions will be based on the outcomes in Units 3 and 4. Students will work through the first three stages of the Systems Engineering Process and should get to the stage where they are commencing their production work. Students have the opportunity to demonstrate innovation and creativity in designing their system. They will need to identify the factors that influence design, planning, production and use of the intended integrated controlled system. They will need to develop a detailed workplan and components/materials list in preparation for the construction of the system using appropriate communication techniques. Students will also need to develop evaluation criteria for the finished system. The Table of electronic symbols and the Mechanical and electrotechnology formula and worked examples available on the Systems Engineering page of the VCAA website will be useful resources to support the teaching of this outcome. A number of the terms used in this outcome are listed in the glossary starting on page 43.

29 Unit 3:Area of Study 2 – Clean energy technologies (page 27)
Outcome 2 Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of renewable and non-renewable energy sources, and analyse and evaluate the technology used to harness, generate and store non-renewable and renewable energy. This Area of study requires students to gain an understanding of the benefits, limitations and impact of using forms of energy from different sources taking into account the wastes that are produced during the extraction, generation, conversion, transportation, storage and use of energy. These all involve the use of technologies that consider a ‘life cycle’ approach. Students need to consider the technologies used to capture, harness, generate, transport and store renewable and non-renewable energy sources. This area of study also includes how the credentials of non-renewables can be improved, for example through gains in efficiency and reduction of CO2 emissions. The focus has changed somewhat from Area of study 3 in Unit 3 in the current study design, so learning activities and assessment tasks will need to be altered or redesigned to reflect the changes. There is quite a lot of useful information on the Internet, particularly on the CSIRO website that will assist with this Area of study. A good reference for this outcome is the book Alternative Energy Demystified. Please refer to the Resources list available on the VCAA website.

30 Systems control and new and emerging technologies
Unit 4 Systems control and new and emerging technologies Students will complete production of their integrated controlled system, will use diagnostic practices and evaluate it, and their use of the Systems Engineering Process in this unit. They will also further their understanding of new and emerging developments looking at a range of engineered systems.

31 Unit 4: Area of Study 1 – Producing, testing and evaluating integrated technological systems (pages 30–31) Outcome 1 Produce, test and diagnose an advanced mechanical-electrotechnology integrated and controlled system using selected relevant aspects of the Systems Engineering Process, and manage, document and evaluate the system and processes. In this Area of study, students continue to construct their integrated, controlled system. Included in this outcome is the development of project management skills. They will learn about the role of standards, specifications, data sheets and technical data manuals in relation to the system they are developing. Students will be using diagnostic testing processes and evaluating both the operational system and their use of the Systems Engineering Process. They will need to comment on how they took into consideration the factors that influenced the design, planning, production and use of the system within their evaluation, (this includes methods of achieving quality of the operational system) and suggest how the system could be improved. This outcome includes safe and correct use of tools and equipment including risk in accordance with OH&S requirements. The key knowledge and key skills in this outcome are not dissimilar to Unit 4, Outcome 2 in the current study design. However there is no longer the requirement to specifically source Australian Standards relevant to the system they are producing. Students will need to use ongoing evaluation, record their decision making, relevant data, changes and modifications.

32 Unit 4: Area of Study 2 – New and emerging technologies (pages 31–32)
Outcome 2 Describe and evaluate a range of new or emerging technologies, and analyse the likely impacts of a selected innovation. This outcome has some similarities with Outcome 3 in Unit 2 in the current study design. The content of this Area of study enables students to investigate cutting edge new and emerging technological innovation, both processes and products. Students need to be able to describe how they work, and where they would be applied. They consider developments in systems engineering processes that improve sustainability, efficiency and risk management of systems. Included is the drivers of the development which may be brought about by new discoveries, new materials, technology convergence, new manufacturing methods and processes. The Internet possibly has some of the most recent and best information on these new and emerging technologies. Industrysearch.com.au is an Australian based site that has very up to date information on the latest technological developments. The CSIRO site also has some useful information. It should be remembered that the innovations that students consider should not be the same ones covered in Unit 3, Outcome 2. The process, system, technology or innovation should have applications in the field of systems engineering, and should have been developed within the last eight years preceding the year of study.

33 Units 1 and 2 assessment Some changes have been made to the assessment task types for Units 1 and 2. Assessment tasks are selected from: documentation of the Systems Engineering Process which may be done as a multimedia presentation, folio, brochure, poster, or report production work (Outcome 2) practical demonstrations test (possibly for Outcome 1) oral presentation Assessment tasks for Unit 1 are listed on page 17 of the Systems Engineering Study Design. There is a range of possible ways students may document the Systems Engineering Process as part of their assessment. It is recommended that the production work and its documentation be assessed for Outcome 2. Assessment tasks for Unit 2 are listed on page 22. The same applies to the types of assessment as for Unit 1.

34 Units 3 and 4 assessment Unit Outcome School-assessed coursework
School-assessed task Examination 3 1 2 10% Marked out of 50 4 % of study score 20% 50% 30% This table shows how the various outcomes in Units 3 and 4 are assessed. There is some change to the marks allocated for School-assessed Coursework. Outcome 2 of Units 3 and 4 are now the research based outcomes and are each marked out of 50. The mark for each will be converted to a percentage so that when combined School-assessed Coursework will contribute 20% to the overall study score. The components of the School-assessed Task are now drawn from Unit 3 Outcome 1 and Unit 4 Outcome 1. Note that the School-assessed Task continues to contribute 50 per cent to the study score. The components of the School-assessed Task are listed on page 34. Assessment of the School-assessed Task is determined by using the evidence collected of student work to address the specific criteria (published annually in the VCAA Bulletin – February School Assessment Supplement). The end of the year exam remains at 1½ hours in length and examines all key knowledge and key skills that underpin the outcomes in Units 3 and 4 (see page 34 of the Systems Engineering Study Design). It continues to contribute 30% to the study score. The examination is externally assessed. The examination specifications and sample examination questions will be available on the Systems Engineering study page on the VCAA website early in 2013. A sample assessment program for Units 3 and 4 is shown on pages 63 and 64 of the Systems Engineering Study Design.

35 Systems Engineering Assessment Handbook
The parts of the Systems Engineering Assessment Handbook are: – Introduction – Assessment – Assessment advice and further resources – Sample approaches to School-assessed Coursework Using the assessment handbook – designing the tasks, using performance descriptors and assessment criteria The parts of the assessment handbook have changed. Information on Administrative procedures for Assessment in VCE studies can be found at In conjunction with each specific outcome in the study design, teachers should refer to the ‘designing the task’ dot points and the performance descriptors in the Systems Engineering Assessment Handbook when developing tasks. Assessment tasks should allow students to achieve a high level of performance. Suggested assessment criteria are included for the School-assessed Coursework tasks in the Systems Engineering Assessment Handbook. The criteria and their mark allocations guide teachers as to the depth and complexity of that particular aspect of the task. There is a close relationship between the dot points under the heading Designing the task; the performance descriptors; and the assessment criteria in the Systems Engineering Assessment Handbook. These have been developed so that they closely relate to the key knowledge and key skills in the study design and capture the intent of the outcome statement.

36 Resources Resources list will be updated annually. Suggestions for additional resources can be provided to the VCAA Curriculum Manager for Systems Engineering. The Resources list for the new study design is available on the VCAA website. Because new resources become available over the accreditation period of the study, the Resources list is no longer published in the study design. The Resources list will be updated annually.

37 School assessment School-assessed task criteria and performance descriptors are published annually in the VCAA Bulletin each February Teachers must ensure that authentication records for both School-assessed Tasks and Coursework are completed. Teachers also need to complete the Teacher Additional Comment sheet for the School-assessed Task. Assessment information regarding School-assessed Coursework is available in the Assessment Handbook to be published on the VCE Systems Engineering study page on the VCAA website. Assessment information regarding the School-assessed Task is published annually in the February VCAA Bulletin and is online at the VCAA website. It contains vital and mandated requirements for assessment of the School-assessed Task. A reminder that the School-assessed Task is statistically moderated against the end of year examination. A percentage of schools will have their school assessment audited. The new four stage audit and review process was outlined in a Special Edition of the December 2011 VCAA Bulletin. The audit process and the statistical moderation of School-assessed Tasks and coursework is aimed to addresses equity and quality across the state and is an opportunity to ensure work is being assessed fairly.

38 Presenters: Bruce Eager Steve Penna With thanks: Robyn Douglass

39 Contact Details tran.lorraine.i@edumail.vic.gov.au Ph: (03) 9651 4407
Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) Lorraine Tran, Curriculum Manager, Technologies Ph: (03)


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