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Professional Learning Workshop. Together for Humanity Together for Humanity is a non-profit organisation facilitating diversity education for adults and.

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Presentation on theme: "Professional Learning Workshop. Together for Humanity Together for Humanity is a non-profit organisation facilitating diversity education for adults and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Professional Learning Workshop

2 Together for Humanity Together for Humanity is a non-profit organisation facilitating diversity education for adults and students around Australia. It is committed to replacing prejudice with respect, and helping all Australians to understand and accept diversity. Difference Differently is funded by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations.

3 Difference Differently PL Workshop Diversity and you

4 Your cultural identity

5 Share your views on… For me, time is… Children should be treated… I like to work… Marriage is… I deal with conflict by… People in positions of authority should be…

6 Dealing with diversity video

7 Difference Differently PL Workshop Why we need diversity education in Australian schools

8 A snapshot of Australians 27% of Australians were born overseas 16% of Australians speak a language other than English at home 22% of Australians do not identify with a faith 61% identify as Christian 529,000 Buddhists, 476,300 Muslims, 275,500 Hindus, and 97,300 Jews 10 million Australians have active internet accounts (not inc mobile phones) Australians took 7 million international trips (Between June 2009/June 2010) Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

9 Diversity and racism Challenging Racism: The anti racism research project, University of Western Sydney (Data collected between 2001 and 2008) 27% feel that because of their own ethnic origin they have been called names or similarly insulted 16.6% have experienced discrimination because of their own ethnic origin in education 12.4% agree they are prejudiced against other cultures 84.4% agree there is racial prejudice in Australia 86.8% agree it is a good thing for a society to be made up of people from different cultures

10 Why do we need diversity education? video

11 The Melbourne Declaration, 2008 Global integration and international mobility have increased in the past decade. As a consequence, new and exciting opportunities for Australians are emerging. This heightens the need to nurture an appreciation of and respect for social, cultural and religious diversity, and a sense of global citizenship… Ensure that schooling contributes to a socially cohesive society that respects and appreciates cultural, social and religious diversity… Develop personal values and attributes such as honesty, resilience, empathy and respect for others… Appreciate Australia’s social, cultural, linguistic and religious diversity… [Be] able to relate to and communicate across cultures, especially the cultures and countries of Asia

12 Australian Curriculum General capabilities: Critical and creative thinking Ethical behaviour Personal and social capability Intercultural understanding Cross curriculum priorities: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia Sustainability

13 What does intercultural understanding look like? What are the key characteristics?

14 Dos and don’ts of diversity education What might this mean? Why is it important?

15 Dos and don’ts of diversity education Acknowledge differences within cultural and other groups.

16 Dos and don’ts of diversity education Explore concepts that are common across cultures.

17 Dos and don’ts of diversity education Go beyond visible notions of culture.

18 Dos and don’ts of diversity education Acknowledge and have awareness of your own culture.

19 Dos and Don’ts of Diversity Education Acknowledge the complexities created by diversity.

20 Dos and Don’ts of Diversity Education Be prepared to challenge student assumptions and reasoning.

21 Difference Differently: Teacher resource Three practical, interactive online modules Flexible and suitable for all school staff Introducing Diversity Education Diversity Education in the Classroom Whole-School Approaches to Diversity Education

22 Exploring the Difference Differently student resource

23 Difference Differently: Student resource Aligned to of the Australian Curriculum: English, History, Geography and Civics and Citizenship Four levels: Years 3/4, 5/6, 7/8, and 9/10 14 modules (6 primary, 8 secondary) Flexible Blended learning approach

24 Developing intercultural understanding Exposure and contact Standpoint and perspective Empathy Media literacy Interpersonal and conflict resolution skills Active citizenship Roleplay, drama and storytelling Reflection

25 English modules Stories about Difference – Level 1:Years 3/4 narratives, inclusion and exclusion Ways of Seeing – Level 2: Years 5/6 Perspective Portraying Australians – Level 3: Years 7/8 TV, film and advertising, stereotypes Media Madness – Level 4: Years 9/10 news media, cultural and other groups

26 History modules Our Communities – Level 1: Years 3/4 communities, cultural diversity, significant days One Country, Many Cultures – Level 2:Years 5/6 Indigenous and international migration, contribution of migrants Beliefs, Then and Now – Level 3: Years 7/8 history and role of religions Who Can Be Australian? – Level 4: Years 9/10 White Australia, citizenship, immigration

27 Geography modules Our Communities – Level 1: Years 3/4 communities, cultural diversity, significant days One Country, Many Cultures – Level 2:Years 5/6 Indigenous and international migration, contribution of migrants Mapping Diversity – Level 3: Years 7/8 why people live where they do, locational disadvantage Thinking Globally– Level 4: Years 9/10 global inequality, Australian aid, globilisation

28 Civics and Citizenship modules Getting to Know Others – Level 1: Years 3/4 meeting people, intercultural communication Many Voices – Level 2: Years 5/6 varied perspectives, democracy, active citizenship Differing Stories – Level 3: Years 7/8 discrimination Defining Identities – Level 4: Years 9/10 personal identity, Australian identity, loyalty

29 Website

30 Classroom strategies for developing intercultural understanding

31 Developing intercultural understanding Exposure and contact Standpoint and perspective Empathy Media literacy Interpersonal and conflict resolution skills Active citizenship Roleplay, drama and storytelling Reflection

32 Exposure and contact Guest speakers Visits to places of worship/cultural significance Interschool programs Use diversity within the school Contact hypothesis Curiosity and questioning

33 Standpoint and perspective From Years 9/10 Defining Identities module What do you see? What do you think about that? What does it make you wonder? Image courtersy of Cassie Jal

34 Standpoint and perspective From Years 7/8 Portraying Australians

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36 Empathy From Student Q and A

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38 Empathy What is empathy? Personal stories Perspective taking exercises (diary entries, creative writing, roleplay)

39 Media literacy From Years 9/10 Media Madness Headlines Activity

40 Media literacy From Years 9/10 Media Madness Fill the gap: Ten ________ heroes honoured with pride Daily Telegraph, August 31 2011 a.Muslim b.Aboriginal c.Aussie d.Asian

41 Media literacy From Years 9/10 Media Madness Ten Aussie heroes honoured with pride Daily Telegraph, August 31 2011

42 Media literacy From Years 9/10 Media Madness Fill the gap: _________ crime gangs cross the ethnic line Daily Telegraph, 8 Feb 2010 a.Muslim b.Aussie c.Asian d.Gay

43 Media literacy From Years 9/10 Media Madness Asian crime gangs cross the ethnic line Daily Telegraph, 8 Feb 2010

44 Media literacy From Years 9/10 Media Madness Fill the gap: ________charged with drink-driving ride-on lawnmower at Ingham Courier Mail, 8 May 2011 a.Teenager b.Aboriginal c.Asian d.Aussie

45 Media literacy From Years 9/10 Media Madness Teenager charged with drink-driving ride-on lawnmower at Ingham Courier Mail, 8 May 2011

46 Media literacy From Years 9/10 Media Madness Fill the gap: Call for action on ________ crime Courier Mail, 3 November 2011 a.Gay b.Aboriginal c.Asian d.Teenage

47 Media literacy From Years 9/10 Media Madness Call for action on Aboriginal crime Courier Mail, 3 November 2011

48 Interpersonal and conflict resolution skills Jioji Ravulo

49 Interpersonal and conflict resolution skills From Years 3/4 Getting to Know Others In which country would it be common to see this gesture used to mean come here? a) Russiab) Chinac) New Zealand d) Mexico

50 Interpersonal and conflict resolution skills From Years 3/4 Getting to Know Others The correct answer is China. While most Australians call people towards them with their palm facing up, many Asian people gesture for people to come with their palm down.

51 Interpersonal and Conflict Resolution Skills From Years 3/4 Getting to Know Others In which country would it be common to see this gesture used to mean ‘yes’ or ‘I agree’? a) USAb) Indonesiac) India d) Australia

52 Interpersonal and conflict resolution skills From Years 3/4 Getting to Know Others The correct answer is India. While most Australians nod their head up and down to say ‘yes’, many Indians nod their head from side to side to say ‘yes’ or to agree with someone.

53 Interpersonal and conflict resolution skills From Years 7/8 Beliefs, Then and Now

54 Active Citizenship Social connection and responsibility Opportunity for cross-cultural exposure Do not reinforce ‘otherness’

55 Drama, roleplay and storytelling From Years 3/4 Stories About Difference

56 Reflection and disclosure From Years 9/10 Defining Identities Self-disclosure and personal stories Harvard Visible Thinking routines

57 Difference Differently Contacts www.differencedifferently.edu.au contact@differencedifferently.edu.au 1800 448 345


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