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1 PERSPECTIVE FROM FROMINDUSTRY. 2 My perspective.  My perspective has been shaped by the following experiences;  student of an independent school;

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Presentation on theme: "1 PERSPECTIVE FROM FROMINDUSTRY. 2 My perspective.  My perspective has been shaped by the following experiences;  student of an independent school;"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 PERSPECTIVE FROM FROMINDUSTRY

2 2 My perspective.  My perspective has been shaped by the following experiences;  student of an independent school;  parent client of 4 independent schools in Queensland;  teacher in the State system in Victoria and NSW;  employer of some 10,000 school leavers over the past 20 years;  founding director of an independent school in Queensland;

3 3 Employer’s expectations.  What are employer’s expectations of employees as a result of their schooling? Interpersonal Skills. Co operative, collaborative, negotiation, communication (oral, written and presentation) plus listening skills; %68.4%

4 4 Employer’s expectations.  What are employer’s expectations of employees as a result of their schooling? Behavioral Characteristics. Business acumen, charismatic, committed, creative, energetic, independent, integrity, leadership and self motivated %67.2%

5 5 Key requirements.  In 2009 the following are the key requirements of entrants to the workplace Be keen to work hard; Go the extra mile; Be honest; Energised; Be punctual; Good follow through; Be reliable; Can do attitude.

6 6 Key requirements.  Can these attributes be taught in our schools?  Is this the sole responsibility of the school?  What roles do / should parents play?

7 7 Schools do shape behaviour.  Actively and passively.  “It’s the way we do things around here”

8 8 Organisational culture. Organisational culture is the sum of individual values and beliefs. Individual values and beliefs only change when you begin;  Seeing yourself differently;  Talking differently to yourself;  Feeling different about yourself.

9 9 THE CULTURE WEB. LEADERSHIP ROLE MODELS ORGANISATION STRUCTURE POWER AND CONTROL MECHANISMS ORGANISATION VALUES AND CULTURE ROUTINES AND RITUALS SYMBOLS (LANGUAGES) STORIES AND MYTHS

10 10 Chambers of Commerce and Industry.  Advise Employers to be aware that young people; Are used to having things well explained; Need adequate information and support available to them; Are able to ask questions as often as needed; Receive regular feedback and be allowed to make mistakes. Are encouraged to develop self–reliance and to be self–directed. However many workplaces are still hierarchical and the young person will be directed to do and not question.

11 11 Chambers of Commerce and Industry.  What to look for in a young school leaver. Good consistent grades; Extra curricula activities; Part time work; Sport or team based activity.

12 12 Chambers of Commerce and Industry.  What to look for in a young school leaver. Demonstrated having thought about the future; Voluntary work; Someone who can approach a business for work; Presents well at interview and is prepared.

13 13 A different model.  Why is this matter to be addressed by secondary schools? It is not a lineal pathway; Employment is not a destination at the end of 12 years of schooling; Today there is a different model.

14 14 Traditional policy.  Traditional policy assumption With retention to Year 12 increasing from 49% in 1986 (DEET, 1993) to about 75% nationally today (ABS, 2007), the expectation – by governments, media and the general public – has become that: teenager = school student

15 15 A Mosaic.  Instead: A Mosaic. A more apt metaphor might be the idea of a mosaic. Young people, both as teenagers and as young adults, are required to put all the pieces into place and to find the answers to life's jigsaw using their own devices. (Spierings, 1999: 7)

16 16 A Mosaic.  "For many high school students working part-time is a normal aspect of their hectic lives, which needs to be fitted in amongst school, study, sporting activities and family commitments“

17 17 A Mosaic.  Genuine recognition of ‘mosaics’ – It is worth it because: Students who have a job during high school are: 65% more likely to gain apprenticeship, 46% more likely to gain full time work (Vickers et al, 2003: 17) Children find work rewarding and see it as an important opportunity to exercise autonomy, develop skills and obtain some form of income.” (NSW Commission for Children and Young People, 2005: 9)

18 18 A Mosaic.  Genuine recognition of ‘mosaics’ – It is worth it because: Markers of adulthood are reversible and impermanent, so that there is no simple ‘arrival’ at adulthood. A European research group used the metaphor of a ‘yo-yo’ to symbolise “the ups and downs of fragile and reversible transitions” to adulthood (EGRIS, 2001: 104). Access Economics (2005); increasing completion of school or an apprenticeship from 81% to 90% by 2010 would increase workforce numbers by 65,000 and expand the economy by more than $9 billion by (in AIG/DSF 2007: 17) Not only would individual living standards improve, but business would have more access to skilled employees and the community would have lower costs associated with welfare, crime and poor health (also see BCA 2003)

19 19 Policy and Practice.  Action by both educational policy and practice. Most important for policy: Support opportunities for participation in work, training and schooling Commit to successful initiatives on a sustainable basis Most important for practice: Collaborate across sectors, across systems/states and with employers Embrace flexibility and diversity in qualifications and pathways

20 20 Competitive Advantage.  Commercial Competitive Advantage If we view this matter through a commercial lens; Is there an opportunity for a competitive advantage for a school that can excel in managing the pathway to fulfilling employment? Conservatively, allowing for the range in fee structures across the industry 12 years of schooling is an investment of $10,000 to $90,000 Is an employment outcome a matter that determines choice in the customer’s decision to purchase?

21 21 Key marketing messages.  Key marketing messages of Independent Schools c  Key marketing messages of Independent Schools centre around; 1.Achievement of offers into Vocational or Higher Education; 2.Total number of Senior Certificates awarded; 3.Percentage of Overall Position (OP) – eligible students with OP 1-15; 4.Academic achievement – OP scores - School % gained v State %.

22 22 Survival skills.  What can schools do to assist students to navigate their way forward in a demanding, complex and competitive workplace environment?

23 23 Survival skills.  Survival skills and attributes enabling the student employee to flourish. Resilience - developing the internal capacity to have another go; Assertiveness - versus aggressiveness; Be visible - in a positive sense. How to “sell” one’s ability and achievements.

24 24 Survival skills.  How to “Manage up” It is probable that they will not be reporting to an experienced and competent senior executive, it is more likely that a school age employee will be supervised / managed by a relatively junior and inexperienced person  Teamwork - how to team particularly when there may be little or no leadership and significant power inequality  Managing Relationships - ranging from mild differences to workplace bullying


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