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Radiology June 15 th 2013 Sofitel Hotel Dr Paul O’Connell.

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Presentation on theme: "Radiology June 15 th 2013 Sofitel Hotel Dr Paul O’Connell."— Presentation transcript:

1 Radiology June 15 th 2013 Sofitel Hotel Dr Paul O’Connell

2 Radiology Imaging Procedures

3 Acute back pain

4 You haven’t put your back out. You’ve tied your shoe lace to your cuff link again!

5 Red Flags indicators of possible serious spinal pathology Possible fracture Major trauma Minor trauma in elderly or osteoporotic Possible tumour or infection Age >50 or <20 years History of cancer Constitutional symptoms (fever, chills, weight loss) Recent bacterial infection IV drug use Immunosuppression Pain worsening at night or when supine Possible significant neurological deficit Severe or progressive sensory alteration or weakness Bladder or bowel dysfunction O/E neurological deficit (in legs or perineum in the case of low back pain)

6 Red Flags indicators of possible serious spinal pathology Possible fracture Major trauma Minor trauma in elderly or osteoporotic Possible tumour or infection Age >50 or <20 years History of cancer Constitutional symptoms (fever, chills, weight loss) Recent bacterial infection IV drug use Immunosuppression Pain worsening at night or when supine Possible significant neurological deficit Severe or progressive sensory alteration or weakness Bladder or bowel dysfunction O/E neurological deficit (eg legs or perineum)

7 pain radiating into the limb in dermatome – lancinating, burning, stabbing, or electric quality limitation of straight-leg-raise to <30 0 CT or MRI to assess for disc herniation – at segmental level consistent with clinical features Acute radicular pain

8 Well, if you insist on a second opinion: Then I’d say ….. it ISN’T sciatica.

9 Acute radicular pain

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11 Transforaminal nerve root block

12 Disc protrusion Subarticular (posterolateral)

13 GP MRI referral Under 16 years of age Head – unexplained seizure(s) – unexplained headache where significant pathology suspected – paranasal sinus disease not responded to conservative therapy Spine (following radiographic examination) – significant trauma – unexplained neck or back pain with associated neurology signs – unexplained back pain if significant pathology suspected

14 GP MRI referral Under 16 years of age for: Knee (following radiographic examination) – for internal joint derangement Hip (following radiographic examination) – suspected septic arthritis – suspected slipped capital femoral epiphysis – suspected Perthes disease Elbow (following radiographic examination) – suspected significant fracture or avulsion injury Wrist (following radiographic examination) – scaphoid fracture is suspected

15 GP MRI referral From 1 November 2013 GPs will be able to request MRIs for all patients over 16 years for clinically appropriate indications

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17 Disc protrusion

18 Spine MRI nomenclature Problem: too many terms Combined task force – North American Spine Society – American Society of Spine Radiology – American Society of Neuroradiology Produce definitions Spine 2001; 26 (5): E93-E113

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20 Annular Tear

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38 Sequestered disc fragment

39 Sequestered fragment

40 Location of herniation

41 Central disc protrusion

42 Subarticular disc protrusion

43 Foraminal disc protrusion

44 Extraforaminal disc protrusion

45 Resorption of herniation

46 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 T1 Disc osteophyte complex

47 Degenerative endplates

48 Modic classification – 1 oedema – Can simulate infection – 2 fat – 3 sclerosis Associated with disc pathology / instability Modic 1 (& 2) may be associated with pain Degenerative endplates

49 Modic 1

50 Evolution of Modic change Modic 1 Modic 2

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53 Modic 1

54 Spondylolisthesis Pars defect L5 T1 sagittal right T2* sagittal right

55 Management of – Acute radicular pain – Chronic low back pain Facetal Sacro-iliac joint – Cervicogenic headaches – Osteoporotic crush fracture – Hypotension headaches Image guided treatment for back pain

56 No no!! Not that one…. The BIG one on the top shelf!!

57 BMJ article 2008 Sciatica from disc herniation - conservative versus surgery Outcomes at 1 and 2 years were similar for 283 patients No clinically significant difference 8 wks & 6 months’ follow-up 56% of patients did not require surgery for recovery. Early surgery roughly doubled the speed of recovery Delayed surgery might result in some extra weeks of discomfort Major advantage of early surgery – more rapid relief of pain – reassurance about recovery – earlier return to normal activities Sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation conservative care versus early surgery 2 year results of a randomised controlled trial BMJ ; June 2008 Department of Neurosurgery, Leiden University Netherlands.

58 Pain Medicine article 2010 Transforaminal injection of steroids a viable alternative to surgery for lumbar radicular pain due to disc herniation. 150 patients randomised into test groups 54% relief at 1 month (>50% reduction of pain) 25% relief at 1 year (after 1 injection) Acute & chronic radiculopathy Transforaminal Steroid Injection for Lumbar Radicular Pain Superior to Placebo Pain Medicine August 2010 Bogduk et al

59 Pain nerve Motor nerve Local anaesthetic needs to cover ≥3 nodes of Ranvier

60 Acute disc protrusion →annular nerve ending pain (+/- referred pain) Mechanical compression / stretch of spinal root →weakness and numbness uninflamed nerve compressed will stop functioning 2 0 inflammation →radicular pain Radiculopathy usually recovers 2-6 weeks but disc resorption takes months Surgical decompression does not always relieve radiculopathy McLain et al Cleveland Clinic J Medicine 71:12 Dec 2004 Disc Protrusion

61 Injury Phospholipase A 2 Arachidonic acid Cyclooxygenase Lipooxygenase Hyperalgaesic Prostoglandins Hyperalgaesic leukotrines & thromboxanes Inflammation & pain Inflammatory cascade NSAID STEROID

62 Perineural injection L5 Perineural injection S1

63 Epidural steroid injection

64 Sacro–iliac joint injection

65 Facet injection - cervical

66 Radiofrequency of “medial branch”

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68 Cervicogenic pain Greater occipital nerve Lesser occipital nerve Third occipital nerve

69 Radiofrequency ablation C2/3 & C3/4

70 Greater occipital nerve block

71 Osteoporotic crush fractures

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74 Vertebroplasty

75 Vertebroplasty The New England Journal of Medicine in studies found no benefit for compression fractures compared to sham procedure – Kallimes University of Washington multicenter, prospective double-blinded randomized trial 131 participants vertebroplasty had no detectable benefit from sham procedures. – Buchinder trial funded by the Australian government and Cook Medical Inc Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 78 participants with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures vertebroplasty and sham procedures nearly identical pain relief

76 Osteoporotic crush fractures usually heal 6-12 weeks Suggest perform vertebroplasty < 6 weeks – Or if fracture / fluid filled cleft persists > 6weeks Buchinder study – trial average 9.5 weeks (up to 12 months) – MRI oedema = fracture (may persist for months after union) Kallimes study – 18 weeks average – No MRI or nuclear medicine required Vertebroplasty Medical Journal of Australia 2010 – reply Clarke et al

77 Vertebroplasty Medical Journal of Australia 2010 – Clarke et al Persisting vertebral body fracture (Kummell’s disease)

78 Medicare response to NEJM articles USA 20/6/2011 in order to be reimbursable – 1) detailed medical record showing pain caused by fracture – 2) radiographic confirmation of a fracture – 3) other treatment plans attempted for a reasonable time – 4) procedure not performed in the emergency department – 5) that at least 1 year of follow-up Australia 1 st November 2011 – Removes vertebroplasty from MBS Vertebroplasty

79 CSF Hypotension Headache

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83 Something, somewhere, went terribly wrong

84 Thank you Something, somewhere, went terribly wrong


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