Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

'I'm a people person’ Conceptualising the relevance of emotional social intelligence as a public relations practitioner attribute. Renae Desai Lecturer.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "'I'm a people person’ Conceptualising the relevance of emotional social intelligence as a public relations practitioner attribute. Renae Desai Lecturer."— Presentation transcript:

1 'I'm a people person’ Conceptualising the relevance of emotional social intelligence as a public relations practitioner attribute. Renae Desai Lecturer in Public Relations Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia

2 Overview 1.The research context 2.Emotional Social Intelligence 3.Peer mentoring: a framework for developing ESI in early to mid-career practitioners 4.Applying ESI to peer mentoring: A three tier approach 5.Conclusions 6.References 7.Acknowledgments

3 The Research Context In 2011, the Public Relations programme at Murdoch University was recruited to take part in an ALTC funded project entitled ‘Internationalisation of the Curriculum in Action’ led by A/Professor Betty Leaske (UniSA; ALTC Research Fellow).

4 The Research Context The research aimed to: “…investigate the curricular implications of transnational public relations education through research into perceptions of employers of public relations graduates in two cities, Singapore and Perth, towards intercultural competence.” (Fitch and Desai, 2011)

5 The Research Context We interviewed 17 PR practitioners in Perth and Singapore in order to address two research questions: 1.What intercultural skills, knowledge and attitudes do employers of public relations graduates in the Australasian region (Perth and Singapore) look for in employees? 2.How can we develop and assure these in our program i.e. what are the implications for our curriculum?

6 The Research Context Several themes arose from the analysis, including but not limited to: 1. Personal attributes of graduates. 2. Knowledge and skills related to specific cultures. 3. Professional knowledge and industry practices.

7 The Research Context We also know from experience in the classroom that most students who are attracted to the ‘bright’ lights of the professional communications industries have innate personal qualities that lend themselves to high emotional intelligence…..if nurtured and developed.

8 My contention is that emotional-social intelligence (ESI) can be developed and nurtured through curriculum activities in undergraduate studies and carried through into industry professional development through an integrated peer mentoring programme. High ESI is essential for the success of the student, early and mid-career practitioner in all communication interactions regardless of the setting. Conceptual Framework: Emotional Social Intelligence

9 Several conceptual EI models such as: 1.Salovey-Mayer Model (1997) 2.Goleman Model (1998) 3.Bar-On Model (1997:2006) Conceptual Framework: Emotional Social Intelligence

10 Further studies into cross cultural implications of EI show distinct differences in constructs. Eg: Sharma et al (2009) in their study based on Hofstede’s dimensions of culture, showed a significant difference in EI constructs in Germany and India. Conceptual Framework: Emotional Social Intelligence

11 For the purposes of this discussion, I have focussed on the constructs of the Bar-On (1997; 2006) model of emotional-social intelligence (ESI) as a basis for identifying areas that could be researched and developed. Conceptual Framework: Emotional Social Intelligence

12 Emotional-social intelligence (ESI) is a cross-section of interrelated emotional and social competencies, skills and facilitators that determine how effectively we understand and express ourselves, understand others and relate with them, and cope with daily demands. (Bar-On, 2006, p14) Conceptual Framework: Emotional Social Intelligence

13 Bar-On (1997:2006) Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence Factors (a)The ability to recognize, understand and express emotions and feelings; (b)The ability to understand how others feel and relate with them; (c)The ability to manage and control emotions; (d)The ability to manage change, adapt and solve problems of a personal and interpersonal nature; and (e)The ability to generate positive affect and be self- motivated. (Bar-On, 2006, p14)

14 Conceptual Framework: Peer mentoring: a framework for developing ESI in early to mid career practitioners Mentoring, according to Zachary (2005, p3) is “a reciprocal and collaborative learning relationship between two (or more) individuals who share mutual responsibility and accountability for helping a mentee work towards achievement of clear and mutually defined career goals” and thus is a good method for developing a talent pool within an organisation and more ambitiously, a whole industry.

15 Conceptual Framework: Peer mentoring: a framework for developing ESI in early to mid career practitioners Mentoring, according to Zachary (2005, p3) is “a reciprocal and collaborative learning relationship between two (or more) individuals who share mutual responsibility and accountability for helping a mentee work towards achievement of clear and mutually defined career goals” and thus is a good method for developing a talent pool within an organisation and more ambitiously, a whole industry.

16 Conceptual Framework: Peer mentoring: a framework for developing ESI in early to mid career practitioners Although mentoring programmes are already common practice for peak bodies, such as the Public Relations Institute of Australia, the efficacy of such programmes relies heavily on the ability of the individual mentor to ‘impart their wisdom’ through perceived well developed interpersonal communication skills underpinned by ESI.

17 Conceptual Framework: Peer mentoring: a framework for developing ESI in early to mid career practitioners Mentors are required to decide for themselves what they think their charge needs to do to ‘improve and develop’ and in this, the success of the relationship can often be hampered due to personal rather than professional perceptions of the purpose of mentoring and the meaning of ESI.

18 Conceptual Framework: Applying ESI to peer mentoring: A three tier approach Step 1 Developing a survey for to develop an ESI profile for the potential mentee utilising an existing instrument such as Bar-On’s self-reporting survey.

19 Conceptual Framework: Applying ESI to peer mentoring: A three tier approach Step 2 Match the mentee to the mentor based on the following model.

20 Conceptual Framework: Applying ESI to peer mentoring: A three tier approach Mirroring peak body membership guidelines Tier 1 – Tertiary Third year undergraduates matched with early career practitioners Tier 2 – Early Career (1-5 years in industry) Early career practitioner matched to mid-career practitioners Tier 3 – Mid Career (5-10 years in industry) Mid career practitioners matched with senior practitioners

21 References Bar-On, R. (2006) The Bar-On Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI). Psicothema, 18(supl.): 13–25. Fitch K. and Desai, R. (2012) Developing global practitioners: Addressing industry expectations of intercultural competence in public relations graduates in Singapore and Perth. Journal of International Communication [Special issue: Cities, Creativity, Connectivity], 18 (1), Fitch, K. and Desai, R. (2011) International public relations education: Singapore and Perth employer perspectives of intercultural competency of public relations graduates. Unpublished report. Gaggioli, S. (2011) Mentoring Experiences Among Female Public Relations Entrepreneurs: A Qualitative Investigation. Thesis. University of Florida. Sharma, S., Deller, J., Biswal, R and Mandal, M.K. (2009) Emotional Intelligence: Factorial Structure and Construct Validity across Cultures. International Journal of Cross Cultural Management. 9(2), Scott-Halsell, S., Blumand, S.C. and Huffman, L. (2011) From school desks to front desks: A comparison of emotional intelligence levels of hospitality undergraduate students to hospitality industry professionals. Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Education. 10(2), Zachary, L.J. (2005). Creating a mentoring culture: The organisation’s guide. San Fransisco: Jossey-Bass.

22 Acknowledgments Co-researcher: Kate Fitch Chief Investigator: A/Professor Betty Leaske 17 participants who took part in the study


Download ppt "'I'm a people person’ Conceptualising the relevance of emotional social intelligence as a public relations practitioner attribute. Renae Desai Lecturer."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google