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Stoichiometry Part 1: moles to moles. Introduction Stoichiometry is the study of the mass and mole relationship between the reactants and products of.

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Presentation on theme: "Stoichiometry Part 1: moles to moles. Introduction Stoichiometry is the study of the mass and mole relationship between the reactants and products of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Stoichiometry Part 1: moles to moles

2 Introduction Stoichiometry is the study of the mass and mole relationship between the reactants and products of a chemical reaction. In order to do stoichiometry properly, we need to know the proper chemical equation which means that we need to know the formulas of the reactants and products and we need a balanced chemical equation.

3 Introduction Stoichiometry is the study of the mass and mole relationship between the reactants and products of a chemical reaction. In order to do stoichiometry properly, we need to know the proper chemical equation which means that we need to know the formulas of the reactants and products and we need a balanced chemical equation.

4 Introduction Stoichiometry relies on the molar ratio between chemicals in the reaction. The molar ratio is the ratio of the coefficients of the individual chemicals. For example, in the reaction: CH 4 (g) + 2O 2 (g) CO 2 (g) + 2H 2 O(l) the molar ratio of CH 4 /O 2 = 1/2 This means that we need 2 moles of O 2 for each 1 mole of CH 4 we use.

5 Lets do an example.

6 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation:

7 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l)

8 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day.

9 CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l)

10 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l)

11 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l)

12 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l)

13 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l)

14 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l)

15 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol)

16 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) 20

17 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) 20 ?

18 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) 20 ?

19 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) 20 ? 1

20 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) 20 ? 1 Step 1: Calculate the mole ratio between CO 2 and LiOH.

21 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) 20 ? 1 Step 1: Calculate the mole ratio between CO 2 and LiOH. n LiOH /n CO2 = coeff LiOH /coeff CO2

22 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) 20 ? 1 Step 1: Calculate the mole ratio between CO 2 and LiOH. n LiOH /n CO2 = coeff LiOH /coeff CO2 n LiOH = (n CO2 )(coeff LiOH )/coeff CO2

23 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) 20 ? 1 Step 1: Calculate the mole ratio between CO 2 and LiOH. n LiOH /n CO2 = coeff LiOH /coeff CO2 n LiOH = (n CO2 )(coeff LiOH )/coeff CO2 n LiOH = (20 mol)(2)/1

24 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) 20 ? 1 Step 1: Calculate the mole ratio between CO 2 and LiOH. n LiOH /n CO2 = coeff LiOH /coeff CO2 n LiOH = (n CO2 )(coeff LiOH )/coeff CO2 n LiOH = (20 mol)(2)/1 = 40 mol

25 In a spacecraft, the carbon dioxide exhaled by astronauts can be removed by its reaction with lithium hydroxide, LiOH, according to the following chemical equation: CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) How many moles of lithium hydroxide are required to react with 20 mol of CO 2, the average amount of exhaled by a person each day. molar mass (g/mol) CO 2 (g) + 2LiOH(s) Li 2 CO 3 (s) + H 2 O(l) n (mol) Step 1: Calculate the mole ratio between CO 2 and LiOH. n LiOH /n CO2 = coeff LiOH /coeff CO2 n LiOH = (n CO2 )(coeff LiOH )/coeff CO2 n LiOH = (20 mol)(2)/1 = 40 mol


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