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“Education for All” 2011 Conference Personalising Learning Opportunities and Challenges Dr Julia Atkin Education & Learning Consultant “Bumgum” Harden-Murrumburrah.

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Presentation on theme: "“Education for All” 2011 Conference Personalising Learning Opportunities and Challenges Dr Julia Atkin Education & Learning Consultant “Bumgum” Harden-Murrumburrah."— Presentation transcript:

1 “Education for All” 2011 Conference Personalising Learning Opportunities and Challenges Dr Julia Atkin Education & Learning Consultant “Bumgum” Harden-Murrumburrah NSW 2587

2 © Julia Atkin, 2011 Personalising learning – what, why, how? Meta-view of educational context - 20C  21C - Educative purpose - Relating curriculum to educative purpose - Improved education ‘technologies’ The nature of change/transformation The nature of learning Exemplars THREADS OF SESSION

3 ... education is at the cross roads. Choosing one direction will lead efforts to lift performance within traditional educational models. Choosing the other will see radical changes in education that will shift the way we think about [schooling]… Steve Maharey HISTORICAL CONTEXT

4 © Julia Atkin, 2011 What is personalised learning like? - Responses When was learning highly personalised? - felt purpose, meaning - experienced as personal challenge - relationship with teacher one of ‘tutor’, mentor, ‘sponsorship’ - alone, individual – unfolding of personal meaning - sense of personal achievement - sense of personal pride - ‘aha’ – got it! - learned how to learn, understood myself as learner - changed view of the world - personal interest, relevance

5 Underpinning metaphor of the Industrial Era © Julia Atkin, 2009 Quality Control: Efficiency Uniformity Meets standard specification No waste

6 journey growth construction- reconstruction creation - recreation transformation enlightenment empowerment enrichment Underpinning metaphors for learning: - organic, dynamic, holistic What constitutes quality control: - for a journey? - in a garden? - in a creation? © Julia Atkin, 2009 It is no wonder that educators rankle at the mention of leagues tables and standardised testing.

7 Educare – means to form, mold or train while… Educere – means to nurture, grow, lead out Inherent tension in the term ‘education’ Which way do you lean? Or do you successfully integrate both? © Julia Atkin, 2010

8 © Julia Atkin, 2011 What are the CHALLENGES in working towards personalising learning? Time Resources Staff expectations Student expectations Lack of know-how Outside pressures Resistance to change

9 © Julia Atkin, 2011 Personalising learning – what is it? Reflect on some of your learning experiences that you consider were ‘personalised’? Relive one or two experiences. What is personalised learning like? What is an image or an analogy for personalised learning? Share your story and image/analogy with two others. What do we mean by personalised learning?

10 The Locomotive Act 1865 (Red Flag Act) was designed to ensure that the early locomotive could not travel faster than a horse by requiring a person to walk ahead (60 yards) of each vehicle waving a red flag. © Julia Atkin,2010 Understanding change – the ‘Red Flag Act’

11 Locomotives on Highways Act 1896 Many of the restrictions were subsequently removed © Julia Atkin,2010 "HJ Lawson and his wife at the start of the Emancipation Run, Brighton, East Sussex, 1896 Artist: Unknown" Timeline Limited weight ‘Red Flag’ Act AmendmentsRemoval of restrictions & speed 1861 – 1865 –

12 From Steam Powered machinery to the Dynamo and Electrification The Dynamo and the Computer: An Historical Perspective on the Modern Productivity Paradox Paul David The American Economic Review, Vol. 80, No. 2, Papers and Proceedings of the Hundred and Second Annual Meeting of the American Economic Association (May, 1990), pp © Julia Atkin,2011 Timeline 1830 – Michael Faraday invents the dynamo Late 1800’s – slow down in production, limited use of electricity Far sighted engineers had envisaged profound transformations electrification would bring……the transformation of industrial processes by new electric power was a long delayed and far from automatic business 1920’s - 50% diffusion What were the restricting factors? Buildings $ ‘Management’ practices, production practices Lack of valuing (and systems for valuing) ‘new goods’

13 © Julia Atkin,2011 ‘ Regime transition thesis’ - transformation is a long delayed and far from an automatic business

14 The origin of the term ‘curriculum Curricle noun historical a light, open, two-wheeled carriage pulled by two horses side by side. ORIGIN mid 18th cent.: from Latin curriculum ‘course, racing chariot,’ from currere ‘to run.’ Meta view – evolution of ‘curriculum’ Are we still advocating curriculum as a ‘narrow track to be run as a competition’ pulled along by teachers?

15 Core Latin Greek Mathematics 1870 KLAs English Maths Science Social Sciences PE/Health/PD Design & Tech Visual & Perf Arts LOTE 1990’s Core English Maths Science History 1962 Arts Geography Commercial Studies Languages PE Craft Key Competencies Essential Skills/Learnings New Basics Essential Learning Development of self & self for society Learning Areas SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM EVOLUTION Cross curricular perspective s General Capabilities We are on the verge of an ‘inversion’ of curriculum in which the ‘core’ task of education is the development of self and self for society. The key challenge is to design curriculum so that the ways of knowing of the Key Learning Areas, the General Capabilities and cross curricular perspectives contribute to the development of the whole self. © Julia Atkin, 2008

16 Core Latin Greek Mathematics 1870 KLAs English Maths Science Social Sciences PE/Health/PD Design & Tech Visual & Perf Arts LOTE 1990’s Core English Maths Science History 1962 Arts Geography Commercial Studies Languages PE Craft Key Competencies Essential Skills/Learnings New Basics Essential Learning Development of self & self for society Learning Areas SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM EVOLUTION Cross curricular perspective s General Capabilities © Julia Atkin, 2008 How did the perceived purpose of Secondary Education in each era influence the curriculum? What was the political and social context of the time? What legacy are we dealing with? How do we move beyond ‘past patterning’?

17 21st century education is increasingly driven by a desire to develop young people who are: o adaptable o creative o collaborative o responsive o self directed o capable of being self managing in networks and less hierarchical settings and communities than experienced by their parents and teachers at the same age. Educative Purpose for 21C © Julia Atkin, 2010 If these are just some of the attributes we need to help students develop, are their learning experiences richly preparing them? Are they given the opportunity to be: Self directed and self managing in their learning?

18 Goal 1: Australian schooling promotes equity and excellence Goal 2: All young Australians become: Successful learners Confident and creative individuals Active and informed citizens Australian Curriculum (accessed 16/10/2010) 18 The Melbourne Declaration of Educational Goals for young Australians unequivocally stated our educative purpose.

19 The Australian Curriculum Learning Areas – ‘subjects’ General Capabilities Literacy Numeracy Information & Communication Technology(ICT) competence Critical & creative thinking Ethical behaviour Personal & Social Competence Intercultural understanding Cross Curriculum Priorities Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures, Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia,Sustainability Achievement Standards How do we ensure the Australian Curriculum does not become a ‘narrow track to be run’? How do we ensure we work with the Aus Curriculum so that it becomes a rich open field to explore?

20 The ‘Essence’ of the Australian Curriculum ‘successful learners confident & creative active and informed citizens’ CROSS CURRICULAR PERSPECTIVES GENERAL CAPABILITIES LEARNING AREAS The Melbourne Declaration of Educational Goals for young Australians unequivocally stated our educative purpose. © Julia Atkin, 2010

21 KEY ELEMENTS: How are schools personalising learning? © Julia Atkin, 2010

22 © Julia Atkin, 2009 From ‘best practice’ to ‘best principle’ We value Personalise d learning beca use I believe I feel better physically and psychologically. Ensure all living spaces have lots of natural light. Lots of windows Large opening doors or shutters Use skylights ‘Glass’ bricks as walls Reduce number of walls Glass roof

23 © Julia Atkin, 2009 WHY and HOW Personalised learning? We value Personalised learning because we believe it is: - transformative - lasting - empowering - enriching - enlightening - motivating - personally meaningful, and it - builds the individual’s capacity to learn

24 © Julia Atkin, 2009 WHY and HOW Personalised learning? We value Personalised learning because we believe it is: - transformative - lasting - empowering - enriching - enlightening - motivating - personally meaningful, and it -builds the individual’s capacity to learn Design Principles Learning experiences that are student directed, driven by student interests and passions Systems and approaches to develop students’ capacity to: Take responsibility for own learning Manage their own learning Reflect on their own learning Set own learning goals – micro and macro Mentoring approach Programs for learning how to learn Metacognition Assessment approaches that focus on:self assessment against own goals, plotting next steps Individual progression Reflection on learning Programs to develop deep knowkedge of SELF and SELF in relation to others

25 © Julia Atkin, 2009 WHY and HOW Personalised learning? We value Personalised learning because we believe it is: - transformative - lasting - empowering - enriching - enlightening - motivating - personally meaningful, and it -builds the individual’s capacity to learn Design Principles Learning experiences that are student directed, driven by student interests and passions Systems and approaches to develop students’ capacity to: Take responsibility for own learning Manage their own learning Reflect on their own learning Set own learning goals – micro and macro Mentoring approach Programs for learning how to learn Metacognition Assessment approaches that focus on:self assessment against own goals, plotting next steps Individual progression Reflection on learning Programs to develop deep knowkedge of SELF and SELF in relation to others Practices

26 Practices & Structures for 21C Ed Purpose ASPECTCONVENTIONAL LEARNING FOR APPROACHKNOWLEDGE ERA Focus of learning ImposedNegotiated Mistakes Should not be madeTo be learned from Assessment Exams Authentic – various modes View of Right - wrongUncertainty - shades Worldof grey Determined by Central authorityLocal/personal needs in context of general/global framework Staffed by Subject expertCross curricula team Aim Theory to practicePractice to theory & theory to practice Ethos Competitive againstStriving for personal best othersagainst criteria & standards

27 Approach Content & teachingProcess & content, learning drivendriven Focus Teaching centredLearning centred Teacher role ExpertFellow learner / facilitator/sometimes expert Emphasis Knowing thatKnowing how & why and how to find out Student Working aloneWorking collaboratively and alone activity– independence and interdependence Student role Passive/receptiveActive/generative metacognitive, reflective Learning ProgrammedFlexible/opportunity experiences guided by framework of outcomes and learners' interests/needs

28 What are our navigation aids? our values beliefs about leadership & learning clarity of purpose open mindedness imagination critical reflection dialogue © Julia Atkin, 2009

29 What is powerful learning?What is it powerful to learn? Education Design & Development Key elements & Shapers WHY school? What is your educative purpose? WHY school? What is your educative purpose? WHAT should students learn? What is essential? What is desirable? WHAT should students learn? What is essential? What is desirable? HOW do students learn? Principles of Effective Learning HOW do students learn? Principles of Effective Learning CONTEXTCONTEXT CONTEXTCONTEXT values & beliefs shapes & informs LEARNINGTHEORYLEARNINGTHEORY LEARNINGTHEORYLEARNINGTHEORY © Julia Atkin, 2009 When we have determined what we believe it is essential and desirable to learn, how do we ensure that it is learned powerfully??


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