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POL 1000 (Intro to Politics): Final Exam Review Sean Clark Lecturer, Memorial University Research Fellow, CFPS Winter Session, 2012 Sean Clark Lecturer,

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Presentation on theme: "POL 1000 (Intro to Politics): Final Exam Review Sean Clark Lecturer, Memorial University Research Fellow, CFPS Winter Session, 2012 Sean Clark Lecturer,"— Presentation transcript:

1 POL 1000 (Intro to Politics): Final Exam Review Sean Clark Lecturer, Memorial University Research Fellow, CFPS Winter Session, 2012 Sean Clark Lecturer, Memorial University Research Fellow, CFPS Winter Session, 2012

2 Lecture Plan  1. Spring & summer course offerings.  2. Final Exam.  3. Course Evaluation.  1. Spring & summer course offerings.  2. Final Exam.  3. Course Evaluation.

3 Spring & Summer Class Offerings  1000 Introduction to Politics & Government.  (O. Croci, slots 2 & 3).  1020 Issues in World Politics.  (Stephen Keller, slot 2).  2200 Introduction to International Politics  (O. Croci, slots 2 & 3).  260W Co-op Work Term I.  (A. Marland & M. Anderson, slot 31 & 33).  2800 Introduction to Canadian Politics & Govt.  (C. Dunn, slots 31 & 33).  3210 International Law.  (F. O’Brien, slots 20 & 32).  3880 Newfoundland & Labrador Politics.  (H. Simms, slot 31).  3902 European Union  (O. Croci, slot 99).  More course information at:   1000 Introduction to Politics & Government.  (O. Croci, slots 2 & 3).  1020 Issues in World Politics.  (Stephen Keller, slot 2).  2200 Introduction to International Politics  (O. Croci, slots 2 & 3).  260W Co-op Work Term I.  (A. Marland & M. Anderson, slot 31 & 33).  2800 Introduction to Canadian Politics & Govt.  (C. Dunn, slots 31 & 33).  3210 International Law.  (F. O’Brien, slots 20 & 32).  3880 Newfoundland & Labrador Politics.  (H. Simms, slot 31).  3902 European Union  (O. Croci, slot 99).  More course information at: 

4 Final  EXAMINATION TIME:  Tuesday, April 17, 7:00pm - 9:00pm.  EXAMINATION PLACE:  IIC 2001 (this classroom).  EXAM FORMAT:  2 HOURS, 2 SECTIONS, (WORTH 40% of Final Grade).  EXAMINATION TIME:  Tuesday, April 17, 7:00pm - 9:00pm.  EXAMINATION PLACE:  IIC 2001 (this classroom).  EXAM FORMAT:  2 HOURS, 2 SECTIONS, (WORTH 40% of Final Grade).

5 Section I.  I. Key Concepts (20 points).  Choose FOUR of 10 terms.  1) define what it means.  2) place it within a practical context.  When, where, why, and how do we see these concepts being used? Why are they relevant to the study of politics?  Each answer should be at least one paragraph long (ie. slightly more than half a page, single- spaced).  Terms will generally be basic concepts taken from evenly across the course.  I. Key Concepts (20 points).  Choose FOUR of 10 terms.  1) define what it means.  2) place it within a practical context.  When, where, why, and how do we see these concepts being used? Why are they relevant to the study of politics?  Each answer should be at least one paragraph long (ie. slightly more than half a page, single- spaced).  Terms will generally be basic concepts taken from evenly across the course.

6 Sample Questions 1.Communism. 2.Consociational Democracy. 3.Indirect democracy. 4.Civil Society. 5.Nation. 6.…. 1.Communism. 2.Consociational Democracy. 3.Indirect democracy. 4.Civil Society. 5.Nation. 6.….

7 Section II.  II. Theories & Debates (20 points).  Answer TWO of 8 questions  Describe particular theories and debates.  Include the broad outlines of the differing schools of thought. Describe how these scholars reach the conclusions that they do.  Answers should be at least a few paragraphs long (ie. approaching two pages, single-spaced).  Answers need not be a traditionally-structured essay, but it must be clear and explicit.  Make sure arguments are supported by evidence.  Highlight with real-world examples.  II. Theories & Debates (20 points).  Answer TWO of 8 questions  Describe particular theories and debates.  Include the broad outlines of the differing schools of thought. Describe how these scholars reach the conclusions that they do.  Answers should be at least a few paragraphs long (ie. approaching two pages, single-spaced).  Answers need not be a traditionally-structured essay, but it must be clear and explicit.  Make sure arguments are supported by evidence.  Highlight with real-world examples.

8 Sample Questions  1. Canada has witnessed several highly publicized campaigns for electoral reform in recent years. Explain where these campaigns have taken place, and why advocates feel so strongly about the need to move towards a more PR-type system. What are the overarching reasons for change? On the other hand, what are the potential detractions of making the switch? Be sure to use the case of New Zealand as an illustration of the reasons both for and against. Finally, describe the current state of the debate in Canada.

9 Sample Questions, II  2.There are two broad theories of democratization. Explain the core argument of each. What variables do they cite as the most important in relation to the development and sustainment of democracy? Similarly, what empirical evidence do they generally cite as proof of their cause. At the same time, what empirical anomalies suggest that each offers merely an imperfect explanation?

10 Sample Questions, III  Cosmopolitanists and nationalists take away very different lessons from studying the phenomenon of globalization. Each suggests a very different prognosis regarding the likely endurance of parochialism. This is not to say that each school of thought is uniform in its understanding of globalization's effects. Nationalists in particular remain divided over whether or not globalization is a good thing. Explain why this is so. Be sure to cite real-world examples in your answer.

11 General Details  Course is application of theoretical frameworks to empirical problems.  Know core theories inside & out (review ppts can help).  Exam questions are based off these slides.  Answers are about:  1. Outlining theory, 2. Support with real world evidence.  Bolster case evidence w sociecon details & historical events.  Be sure every assertion has evidence to support it.  ==> demonstrate how theory is best evaluating in light of the available evidence.  Questions chosen evenly, from across the course.  Only material raised in class will be on the exam.  Lots of choice = really know the questions you choose.  Is ‘grand bargain’ between instructor & student.  Course is application of theoretical frameworks to empirical problems.  Know core theories inside & out (review ppts can help).  Exam questions are based off these slides.  Answers are about:  1. Outlining theory, 2. Support with real world evidence.  Bolster case evidence w sociecon details & historical events.  Be sure every assertion has evidence to support it.  ==> demonstrate how theory is best evaluating in light of the available evidence.  Questions chosen evenly, from across the course.  Only material raised in class will be on the exam.  Lots of choice = really know the questions you choose.  Is ‘grand bargain’ between instructor & student.

12 General Details, II  Grading: you begin with zero marks & go up.  Demonstrating command of material earns you marks. Not start from 100% and subtract.  Not a trivia test--are free to choose whatever cases you are most comfortable with.  Yet more detail inside your argument = higher marks.  Feel free to use whatever case studies you are most comfortable with.  Excessively short answers will be heavily penalized.  Write legibly. Kindness is a well-appreciated virtue.  Further questions:  Or come see me in person.  GOOD LUCK!  Grading: you begin with zero marks & go up.  Demonstrating command of material earns you marks. Not start from 100% and subtract.  Not a trivia test--are free to choose whatever cases you are most comfortable with.  Yet more detail inside your argument = higher marks.  Feel free to use whatever case studies you are most comfortable with.  Excessively short answers will be heavily penalized.  Write legibly. Kindness is a well-appreciated virtue.  Further questions:  Or come see me in person.  GOOD LUCK!

13 Course Feedback  1. Structure.  Concept flow, assignments.  2. Content.  Material covered, text, reader.  3. Lecture.  Format, pace, delivery.  Remember to suggest alternatives.  Is not a democracy, but am open to practical suggestions (i.e. literature review).  1. Structure.  Concept flow, assignments.  2. Content.  Material covered, text, reader.  3. Lecture.  Format, pace, delivery.  Remember to suggest alternatives.  Is not a democracy, but am open to practical suggestions (i.e. literature review).

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