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BT&M MANAGEMENT COURSES: EXPLANATIONS, RATIONALES & COMPROMISE K. Coley, L. D’Orazio, M. Piczak December 14, 2005.

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Presentation on theme: "BT&M MANAGEMENT COURSES: EXPLANATIONS, RATIONALES & COMPROMISE K. Coley, L. D’Orazio, M. Piczak December 14, 2005."— Presentation transcript:

1 BT&M MANAGEMENT COURSES: EXPLANATIONS, RATIONALES & COMPROMISE K. Coley, L. D’Orazio, M. Piczak December 14, 2005

2 THE CHALLENGE To select a roster of courses that could be acceptable to a range of disciplines To select a roster of courses that would provide timeless, universal skills and attitudes to prepare BT&M graduates for the current positions and future promotions To be mindful of evolving directions of engineering education in the Canadian context To contribute to the generalist/specialist balance appropriate for B.Tech. graduates To develop a structure that would permit some latitude for student choice To accomplish all this within the constraints of 7 courses

3 OUR METHODOLOGY Draw on the combined experience of the Management Courses Team: K. Coley, BSc., Ph.D., DIC, Chair Material Sciences & Eng., McMaster University, Former Engineering & Management Program Chair L. D’Orazio, B.Eng., MBA, M.Eng., Ph.D., P.Eng., former chair, Mechanical Eng., Mohawk College, adjunct professor, University of Western Ontario M. Piczak, Dipl.T., B.Comm., MBA, former chair Industrial Management, Mohawk College, part time professor, McMaster University (Faculty of Business and B.Tech.) Keep in mind McMaster’s collection of course offerings to their B.Eng. students Internet search for what other Schools of Engineering and Management are teaching November 8, 2005 Think Tank presentations Canvassing B.Tech. students for their views on skills they believe they require to top up technical training (n=50) Review Think Tank notes, s and minutes Review ‘Evolution of Engineering Education in Canada’, 1999

4 WHEN CHOOSING Think both long term and short term for the skills that graduates could benefit from ‘Kill as many birds’ as possible with one stone for every course choice Try to appeal to as many disciplines as possible realizing that we could not possibly please everyone Keep the courses management/business oriented Keep the courses general and universal Call for flexibility to the courses and electives to capitalize on emerging topics and faculty strengths Acknowledge that adult learners like choice to permit tailoring of their studies Let the selections be driven, not by our own preferences or biases, but instead what we believe the market needs and wants Distinguish between musts and wants Keep in mind PEO requirements

5 PROPOSED COURSES CORE Financial Management Organizational Behaviour Human Resource Management Entrepreneurship Project Management Strategy Formulation Elective ELECTIVES SPC/6 Sigma Methods Engineering Economics Special Topics Problem Solving & Decision Making Lean Manufacturing New Product Development

6 WHY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Current B.Techs. have little/no feel for money/costing Lack of money sense is a source of criticism for engineering graduates in general Money is the universal language of management where nothing happens until it makes financial sense Should/must have some exposure to both financial and managerial accounting Were there no accounting, someone would ask ‘how can you not have accounting?’ Engineering decisions/recommendations do not occur in a financial vacuum The ‘Money Engineer’

7 WHY ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Soft skills remain hot, current topic Rarely go ‘out of style’ Graduates need team, leadership, group skills exposure All B.Tech. work occurs in organizational settings

8 WHY H.R.M. Need exposure to leading edge practices for recruiting, selecting, motivating and retaining quality employees Teach students to respect statutory minima/maxima to comply with the law What many experts refer to as most unique source for competitive advantage because of its relative immobility

9 WHY PROJECT MANAGEMENT Graduates quickly become involved in managing projects of various sizes Will be a skill they resort to throughout their careers across a broad range of projects Permits students to appreciate the need to manage the amalgam of physical, human and financial resources

10 WHY ENTREPRENEURSHIP New company formation and small business is engine of Canada’s economy Students need to be taught to think in terms of business planning and business plans Encourage starting their own enterprise and consequent hiring of employees Business plan preparation is integral part of ‘intrapreneuring’ Stimulate thinking beyond an ‘employee’s mentality’

11 WHY STRATEGY FORMULATION Prepares graduates to think like their managers Adopt a brand of thinking that considers broader contexts Promotes examining factors occurring external to the firm Provides an analytical framework which is normal and natural to everyone in this room (SWOT thinking) Promote opportunistic state of mind within the confines of an organization To prepare B.Techs. for their next promotion

12 WHY AN ELECTIVE To permit the student to tailor their studies to issues of interest and need to them To allow flexibility within the curriculum to examine emerging issues of the day

13 KILLING n BIRDS WITH 1 STONE FIN. MGMT.O.B.H.R.M. PROJ. MGMT.E'SHIP. STRAT. FOR'N. SHORT/LONG TERM THINKING ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK 2 COURSES CAPTURED SOFTWARE INCLUDED DIRECT APPEAL AX DISCIPLINES

14 1 st CUT SCORE CARD (M=Must; E=Elective) BT&M Committee ITCivilProcess Automation Comments (max. 4M) Fin. Mgmt.M= 2M O.B.ME= 2M, 1E HRMM= 2M Proj. Mgmt.MMNP= 3M, 1NP E’shipE= 1M, 1E Strat. Form.M= 2M

15 DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC ELECTIVES CITED Supply chain management TQM Ethics & IT law Accounting mathematics Health and safety management Finance Technical sales Economics and marketing Others

16 A POSSIBLE COMPROMISE 5 EMERGING CORE PROJECT MGMT. ORG’L. BEH’R. FIN’L. MGMT. E’SHIP. STRAT. FOR’N. + 1 DOMAIN SPECIFIC ELECTIVE 1 ELECTIVE DOMAIN SPECIFIC ELECTIVE Mfg. Civil IT Process Auto. SPC/6 Sigma Methods Engineering Economics Special Topics Problem Solving & Decision Making Lean Manufacturing New Product Development H.R.M.

17 1.Student chooses 1 from respective discipline specific and management elective 2.Student chooses any 2 electives with no restrictions* 3.Student gets no choices within completely prescribed curriculum * Our recommendation – let the customer/student pick and may the best and most relevant courses win. 3 WAYS TO GO?

18 ALL WE ASK To keep an open mind Be mindful of resource limitations Be mindful of the benefits associated with exposure to other disciplines and alternate paradigms To remember that if a course is so central to a discipline it could/should be a year 1-3 ‘required’ Think both short term (soon after graduation) and long term (in preparation for their next promotion) Think like our two customers i.e. students and employers in terms of needs and wants

19 BT&M MANAGEMENT COURSES: EXPLANATIONS, RATIONALES & COMPROMISE K. Coley, L. D’Orazio, M. Piczak December 14, 2005 The end


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