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All Disasters Are Local: Getting Organized A.J. Briding Certified Emergency Manager Certified Organizational Resilience Executive.

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Presentation on theme: "All Disasters Are Local: Getting Organized A.J. Briding Certified Emergency Manager Certified Organizational Resilience Executive."— Presentation transcript:

1 All Disasters Are Local: Getting Organized A.J. Briding Certified Emergency Manager Certified Organizational Resilience Executive

2 Overview of Presentation Review Review The Evolution of an Emergency The Evolution of an Emergency Considerations for Engagement for Clubs and Districts Considerations for Engagement for Clubs and Districts What to Do and How to Do It: The Emergency Operations Plan What to Do and How to Do It: The Emergency Operations Plan

3 Review NIMS NIMS ICS ICS EOC EOC ESFs ESFs MACS MACS COOP & COG COOP & COG

4 Governments: Putting It All Together Normal business operations Normal business operations Continuity of operations procedures IT disaster recovery procedures COOP/DRP/COG Potential or Actual Emergency Potential or Actual Emergency Emergency Processes: Evacuation Sheltering Search & Rescue Public Security Public Health Etc Business emergency actions Multi-Agency Coordination System Emergency Operations Center ESFs Emergency Management (NIMS and NRF) Policy and Coordination Field Operations Incident Command System (ICS)

5 Notional Local and State ESFs ESF-1 Transportation ESF-1 Transportation ESF-2 Communications ESF-2 Communications ESF-3 Public Works and Engineering ESF-3 Public Works and Engineering ESF-4 Firefighting ESF-4 Firefighting ESF-5 Emergency Management ESF-5 Emergency Management ESF-6 Mass Care, Housing and Human Services ESF-6 Mass Care, Housing and Human Services ESF-7 Resource Support (Logistics) ESF-7 Resource Support (Logistics) ESF-8 Public Health and Medical Services ESF-8 Public Health and Medical Services ESF-9 Search and Rescue ESF-9 Search and Rescue ESF-10 Hazardous Materials and Radiological ESF-10 Hazardous Materials and Radiological ESF-11 Agriculture ESF-11 Agriculture ESF-12 Energy ESF-12 Energy ESF-13 Public Safety and Security ESF-13 Public Safety and Security ESF-14 Community Recovery, Mitigation and Economic Stabilization ESF-14 Community Recovery, Mitigation and Economic Stabilization ESF-15 Public Information ESF-15 Public Information Unskilled volunteers are always needed!

6 Most Emergencies Are Local CITIZEN RESPONSE LOCAL RESPONSE STATE FEDERAL In the U.S., primary responsibility for emergency response is at the local level

7 How It Works: No-Notice Emergency Incident Command established Actual Emergency Event Actual Emergency Event Unified Command established Area Command established Full MACS support (Including EOC) Volunteer Agencies DEOC stood up EOC monitoring (If required) ( Department Emergency Operations Center)

8 No-Notice Emergency Escalation Unified Command established Area Command established Full MACS support (Including EOC) State Unified Command established Full SEOC support Resource coordination Federal ESFs activated (NRP) Resource coordination Joint Requirements Office (JRO) stood up -- For a hurricane, all of these elements would likely stand up simultaneously

9 How Does All This Happen? You need a plan! You need a plan! – Structure (i.e., NIMS and ICS) – Mobilization and response (i.e., NRF) – Threats to prepare for (i.e., NPG) and capabilities to reduce the risk

10 The Essential EOP What do you want to do? The mission What do you want to do? The mission – Disaster Readiness – Disaster Response – Disaster Relief – Disaster Recovery What are the threats to prepare for? What are the threats to prepare for? – Risk Assessment and management How to take action? How to take action? – Procedures, checklists, and information

11 Mission Considerations: Rotary Strengths in Disasters District, regional, national, and international presence and network District, regional, national, and international presence and network Highly competent professionals in all classifications Highly competent professionals in all classifications Business and industry backbone Business and industry backbone Goodwill and volunteer focus Goodwill and volunteer focus Probably no better readiness and response potential in any private sector organization!

12 CLUB STATE NATIONAL INTERNATIONAL LOCAL CLUB Rotary Spheres of Engagement

13 The Emergency Management Cycle Readiness Preparedness.. Response.. Rebuilding

14 Four Phases of Emergency Management Preparedness/Prevention Preparedness/Prevention – Building, sustaining, and improving operational capability and resilience – Avoiding or stopping an incident before it occurs Mitigation Mitigation – Reducing or eliminating risks or their impact Response Response – Immediate actions (including damage assessment and critical infrastructure recovery) – Secondary response (public health, etc) Recovery Recovery – Service and site restoration (public and private sectors) – Economic and community viability

15 The Private Sector— Victim, Spectator, or Player?

16 Determining Your Mission Club members in disasters Club members in disasters – What do members need? Personal preparedness and recovery Personal preparedness and recovery Business preparedness and recovery Business preparedness and recovery – Determine membership status How can other Rotarians help? How can other Rotarians help? Outreach to other Clubs Outreach to other Clubs – Club-to-Club partnerships – Club to District to Club (District as middleman) Overseas travel Overseas travel – Preparation and risk mitigation (medical, physical threat) – Recovering Rotarians from disaster zones

17 District as Coordination Center Communications node Communications node – Coordination between clubs – Input point to and from Rotary National / International Resource request and coordination center Resource request and coordination center Need remote alternate (backup in case District capability is lost) Need remote alternate (backup in case District capability is lost)

18 Key to Surviving Disasters: The Community Individual and family preparation Individual and family preparation Citizen engagement Citizen engagement Volunteer manning Volunteer manning Private sector readiness Private sector readiness Economic resiliency Economic resiliency -- Lack of recovery can be the greatest impact of a disaster

19 Community Preparation Promotion and facilitation of readiness programs in the community Promotion and facilitation of readiness programs in the community – DHS Ready Programs (www.ready.gov) Ready America Ready America Ready Business Ready Business Ready Kids Ready Kids – Citizen Corps (www.citizencorps.gov) Volunteer focus Volunteer focus Create and assist with equivalent programs in other countries, if not already present Create and assist with equivalent programs in other countries, if not already present Consider risk mitigation in overseas projects Consider risk mitigation in overseas projects – Eliminate obvious threat vulnerabilities

20 Community Preparation (con’d) Community infrastructure readiness Community infrastructure readiness – Medical systems – Transportation systems – Power infrastructure – Communications providers – Education (K-12 districts, college campuses)

21 Community Response Provide resources and services through coordination with the EOC Provide resources and services through coordination with the EOC – Volunteer workers – Skilled personnel (i.e., public health and medical) – Equipment (transport, transformers, etc) – Coordinate between EOC and Rotary for additional resources Unsolicited (uncoordinated) donations and personnel generate more problems than solutions!

22 Community Recovery ESF 14: Community recovery, mitigation, and economic stabilization ESF 14: Community recovery, mitigation, and economic stabilization – Rebuilding and public works projects Rotary member business recovery Rotary member business recovery Mitigation measures built into Rotary recovery projects at home and overseas Mitigation measures built into Rotary recovery projects at home and overseas – Robust critical infrastructure components Water, sanitization, communications, power, food distribution, medical support) Water, sanitization, communications, power, food distribution, medical support)

23 State-Level Assistance State EOCs State EOCs – Contact point for resources provided through Rotary State VOADs State VOADs – Partnership with volunteer agencies providing coordinated emergency support

24 International Assistance Same basics: Preparation, mitigation, response, recovery Same basics: Preparation, mitigation, response, recovery Value of local Rotarians Value of local Rotarians – Situational awareness (local intel) – Local and national emergency management systems and procedures – Legal requirements – Coordination point Medical protection (Vaccinations, anti-malarial pills, safe food and water protocols, etc) Medical protection (Vaccinations, anti-malarial pills, safe food and water protocols, etc) Physical security (criminal and terrorist threat) Physical security (criminal and terrorist threat) Visas Visas

25 Preparation Starts With Risk Assessment

26 Managing Risk Eliminate or avoid Eliminate or avoid Transfer Transfer Accept Accept Reduce to acceptable level (mitigate or control) Reduce to acceptable level (mitigate or control) – reduce vulnerability – minimize the impact (consequence) Partnership between city planners, EMAs, and citizens Partnership between city planners, EMAs, and citizens Private Voluntary Orgs and Non-Governmental Orgs Private Voluntary Orgs and Non-Governmental Orgs

27 Maxims for Crisis Actions Keep it simple Keep it simple – Think like someone in a foxhole, not someone in a boardroom Make sure it works during disasters, not just when things are copacetic Make sure it works during disasters, not just when things are copacetic Plan for the worst Plan for the worst Train and exercise it Train and exercise it An ounce of mitigation is worth a pound of response An ounce of mitigation is worth a pound of response Complacency can be deadly Complacency can be deadly

28 First: What’s the Plan and Who’s In Charge? What’s the plan? What’s the plan? What is its trigger? What is its trigger? Who has decision making authority? Who has decision making authority? What authority do they have? What authority do they have? What if they’re off-line or incapacitated (line of succession)? What if they’re off-line or incapacitated (line of succession)? Checklists are wonderful! Checklists are wonderful! – If well conceived

29 Can’t Do It Without Communications! Communications Plan Communications Plan – Who to call? How? What are your comm requirements? What are your comm requirements? – ‘Voice’ (landline, cell, text messaging, , VoIP*, radio, satcom, etc) – Data (files, data, photos, etc) – Infrastructure (networks, servers, applications, databases) *Voice over Internet Protocol (phone lines carried over computer networks)

30 Checklists Keep Your Head Straight If you’re shooting from the hip, your accuracy is questionable If you’re shooting from the hip, your accuracy is questionable If you’re shooting from the hip under stress, I wouldn’t want to stand close to you If you’re shooting from the hip under stress, I wouldn’t want to stand close to you Well-constructed checklists provide focus and accuracy Well-constructed checklists provide focus and accuracy Keep them simple Keep them simple

31 What It Takes to Be Ready “If you know the enemy and know yourself you need not fear the results of a hundred battles” (Sun Tzu) “Plans are nothing; planning is everything.” (Eisenhower) “Life is what happens when you’ve made other plans” (Charles Schultz) Leadership Leadership Knowledge Knowledge The ability to make and communicate informed decisions The ability to make and communicate informed decisions Prepared people and resilient systems Prepared people and resilient systems 31

32 The Rotary EOP Template Mission Statement Mission Statement – Disaster Readiness – Disaster Response – Disaster Relief – Disaster Recovery Essential Functions and Critical Resources Essential Functions and Critical Resources Risk Analysis Risk Analysis Appendices and Annexes Appendices and Annexes – Critical information and checklists

33 Prep for the Workshop Look over the template Look over the template Think over your potential club mission areas (what it wants to do in disasters) Think over your potential club mission areas (what it wants to do in disasters) Think about which functions you would consider to be critical Think about which functions you would consider to be critical Districts—how do you want to participate? What are your essential functions? Districts—how do you want to participate? What are your essential functions?

34 Discussion A.J.

35 35 Murphy’s Laws of Combat Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid. If it’s stupid, but works, it’s not stupid. Combat-ready units often fail inspections. Inspection-ready units often fail in combat. The easy way is always lined with SAMs.* Don’t look conspicuous. It draws fire. Never draw fire; it irritates everyone around you. When in doubt, empty the magazine. Never fly wing on anyone braver than you. Formation flight is essential. It gives them other people to shoot at. Try to look unimportant, they may be low on ammo. Incoming fire has the right of way. If the enemy is in range, so are you. Friendly fire isn’t. Tracers work both ways. Professionals are predictable but the world is full of amateurs. *Surface-to-Air Missiles


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