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Designing for Interactivity in Online Learning Spaces Pat Anderchek Faculty Liaison, e-Learning CTLR.

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Presentation on theme: "Designing for Interactivity in Online Learning Spaces Pat Anderchek Faculty Liaison, e-Learning CTLR."— Presentation transcript:

1 Designing for Interactivity in Online Learning Spaces Pat Anderchek Faculty Liaison, e-Learning CTLR

2 Please comment, ask, interject, question at any time! During this session…

3 Introduce Your Partner Previous ExperiencesPrevious Experiences Goals for attendingGoals for attending Specific questions regarding interactivity and online learning spaces?Specific questions regarding interactivity and online learning spaces? Introductions:

4 Today we will endeavour to link: Experiences & Thoughts Assumptions & Theory Oh my! & Challenges Roles & Next steps

5 “Bad” teaching + technology = expensive “bad” teaching Technology is a Resource!

6 If you don’t know where you are going, technology will not help you get there. or If you are headed in the wrong direction, technology won’t help get you to the right place.

7 We suggest that when you begin online learning that you… that you…

8 Start small and grow…

9 The opposite applies to designing for interactivity, quality education/learning requires high levels of interaction by learners

10 e-Learning is about the is about the “learning” not about the ‘e'

11 Goal of Integration improved learning =interactivity

12 E-Learning Adoption Web-facilitatedWeb-facilitated Web-enhancedWeb-enhanced

13 Hopefully… Blended or Mixed-Mode The most effective in terms of increased grades. ( Dziuban, Hartman & Moskal, 2005)

14 Maybe…eventually? Online Entire course is delivered onlineEntire course is delivered online

15 It is not… It is: “reciprocal events that require at least two objects and two actions. Interactions occur when these objects and events “reciprocal events that require at least two objects and two actions. Interactions occur when these objects and events mutually influence one another” (Wagner 1994) Interaction

16 1.Learner-Learner Interaction Types

17 2. Educator-Learner Interaction Types

18 3. Learner-Content Interaction Types

19 F2F Classroom Think about your various experiences in the F2F classroom, both as an educator and maybe as a learner. Consider each of the three areas: 1. Learner-Learner interaction 1. Learner-Learner interaction 2. Educator-Learner interaction 2. Educator-Learner interaction 3. Learner-Content interaction 3. Learner-Content interaction What made the experiences positive or negative for you?

20 e-Learning Your experiences with the online environment, as an educator and as a learner in these three areas. 1. Learner-Learner interaction 1. Learner-Learner interaction 2. Educator-Learner interaction 2. Educator-Learner interaction 3. Learner-Content interaction 3. Learner-Content interaction What made these experiences positive or negative for you?

21 What words come to mind?

22 Words Like… Challenging Learning focused Relevant Organized Active/engaged Constructive learning Feedback rich Safe opportunities Anchored Individualized Learner control & responsibility Authentic assessment Repetition

23 Good Practice (Chickering & Gamson) 1.Encourages contact between students and faculty 2.Develops reciprocity and cooperation among students 3.Encourages active learning 4.Gives prompt feedback 5.Emphasizes time on task 6.Communicates high expectations 7.Respects diverse talents and ways of learning

24 Assumptions Interaction has always been valued in education, has the greatest impact on learning & is a crucial component to all forms of education, including e- Learning move from passive to active learnersmove from passive to active learners learn with greater meaninglearn with greater meaning move from surface to deeper learningmove from surface to deeper learning have a greater retention of learninghave a greater retention of learning

25 Deep & Meaningful Learning Learner ContentEducatorLearner Interactions Personal Application & Value

26 Challenges as Educators?

27 Challenges Choosing technology Time Workload Authentic assessments Learner diversity Resources Safe opportunities Costs Class size Design & development support Learner preferences

28 Solution Technology provides the opportunity to change learner– educator & learner-learner interaction into enhanced forms of learner-content interactions which meets a diversity in learner needs & preferences

29 In partners: Describe ways in which technology can increase the level of interactivity in each area. 1. Learner-Learner interaction 2. Educator-Learner interaction 3. Learner-Content interaction Online Interaction Online Interaction

30 Online Interactivity Group based projects Moderator of discussions CMC or discussion forums Online presentations Blogs & Wikis Problem-based learning Games Video streaming LMS Self-tests, quizzing tools Collaborative/active learning spaces Podcasting Simulations Media

31 Finally… Research does not support the finding that learning in one medium is superior in all ways to learning supported via other media. (Anderson, 2006) Yet we tend to believe F2F is superior… (Fahy, 2006)

32 “Old World” vs. “New World”

33 Getting the Mix Right (Terry Anderson) Difficult to get the mixture right between independent study and interactive learning strategies and activities.Difficult to get the mixture right between independent study and interactive learning strategies and activities. We are unlikely to find a “perfect” mix that meets all learner and institutional needs across all curricula and content.We are unlikely to find a “perfect” mix that meets all learner and institutional needs across all curricula and content.

34 Significant costs are associated with high levels of interaction in all 3 domains. in all 3 domains.

35 Anderson’s Theorem “Deep and meaningful formal learning is supported as long as one of the three forms of interaction (student–teacher; student- student; student-content) is at a high level. The other two may be offered at minimal levels, or even eliminated, without degrading the educational experience.” The other two may be offered at minimal levels, or even eliminated, without degrading the educational experience.” (p. 4)

36 “High levels of more than one of these three modes will likely provide a more satisfying educational experience, though these experiences may not be as cost or time effective as less interactive learning sequences.”

37 Equivalency Theory “As an educator you can substitute one type of interaction for one of the others (at the same level) with little loss in educational effectiveness – thus the label of an equivalency theory”(p.5)

38 Deep & Meaningful Learning Learner ContentEducatorLearner Interactions Personal Application & Value

39 Learner Content Educator Learner Interactions

40 Learner Content Educator Learner Interactions

41 Learner Content Educator Learner Interactions

42 Given the costs associated with high levels of interactivity in all three areas this theorem can act as a guide for educators developing e-Learning spaces that are both effective & efficient in meeting diverse learning needs. (p.5) learning needs. (p.5) Effective & Efficient

43 Reflections 1.What is your vision of your learning space in 5 years? 2.What strategies do you employ to facilitate interactivity in the learning process? 3.Think of your online learning spaces and rank accordingly. 4.How high is your level of interactivity in each of the 3 areas?

44 Reflections 5.Are their cost effective ways to increase how you facilitate interactivity in each of the 3 domains so that your general interactivity score is higher? 6.In which area can you reduce the level of interactivity & subsequently increase the level of interactivity in another domain? 7.Consider using this equivalency theory in your F2F courses, blended delivery & in your program structure & delivery.

45 Conclusion We can’t continue to increase the level of interactivity in every domain in every courseWe can’t continue to increase the level of interactivity in every domain in every course Effective implementation of technology can change learner–educator and learner-learner interactionEffective implementation of technology can change learner–educator and learner-learner interaction

46 enhanced forms of enhanced forms of learner-content interactions & more flexible & effective learning spaces Creation

47 Questions&comments? ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

48 References Anderson, T, (2003) Getting the mix right again: An updated and theoretical rationale for interaction, The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, Vol 4, No 2 (2003), ISSN: , retrieved Oct 30, 2006, from Chickering, A. & Gamson, Z. (1989). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, March, pp retrieved December 4, 2006 from Fahy, P., (2006). Online Teaching in Distance Education and Training, Athabasca University, Study Guide retrieved October 1, 2006 from Roblyer, M. D. & Ekhaml, L. (2000). How interactive are your distance courses? a rubric for assessing interaction in distance learning, retrieved November 15, 2006, from University or West Georgia, Online Course Checklist, retrieved Dec 1, 2006 from Hartman, J, Moskal, P, and Dziuban, C (2004) Preparing the academy of today for the learner of tomorrow, Educating the Net Generation, retrieved September 2, 2006 from

49 Presentation Content & Construction Pat Anderchek, 2006 ________________________ ________________________________________________


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