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FROM SOFTWARE TO SERVICES. FROM SOFTWARE TO SERVICES... FROM COMPUTING TO COMMUNITIES?

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Presentation on theme: "FROM SOFTWARE TO SERVICES. FROM SOFTWARE TO SERVICES... FROM COMPUTING TO COMMUNITIES?"— Presentation transcript:

1 FROM SOFTWARE TO SERVICES

2 FROM SOFTWARE TO SERVICES... FROM COMPUTING TO COMMUNITIES?

3 1. COMPUTER TIME SHARING 2. DESKTOP COMPUTING 3. THE INTERNET 4. SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE/WEB 2.0

4 BIG IRON MAINFRAME 1950s 1960s 1970s mainframes and minicomputers expensive, limited access

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6 UNIVAC 1232

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8 TIME SHARING number crunching financial institutions insurance companies military/defense

9 TIME SHARING solution: one computer, many terminals

10 TIME SHARING In time-sharing, many terminals are connected to a single mainframe. Much of the computer's time is spent idle, waiting for input from the user The mainframe accepts commands from different terminals during idle moments.

11 DESKTOP COMPUTING

12 your own computer

13 DESKTOP COMPUTING standalone software packages Word processing Desktop publishing Spreadsheets

14 DESKTOP COMPUTING does not require internet access does not take advantage of network effects user is responsible for installing patches/upgrades MSOffice, Quickbooks, etc.

15

16 THE INTERNET

17 DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) ARPANET origins Interconnected computers for sharing research 1970s packet-switching TCP/IP

18 THE INTERNET commercial use – 1988 World Wide Web – early 1990s WWW - http, pages, hyperlinked documents, domain names

19 THE INTERNET Mosaic browser (displayed images inline with text, easier to use)

20 THE INTERNET 1990s - increasing popularity and reliance on Internet computer as communications tool

21 THE INTERNET search engines, , chat web applications (databases, maps, simple games) web transactions (e-commerce) the dot-com mania (and the dot-com crash)

22 THE INTERNET personal websites up-front investment in the creation of content expert-indexed information The Read-Only Web

23 FROM WEB 1.0 TO WEB 2.0 personal websites blogs up-front investment in the creation of content user-created content expert-indexed information user-organized information/folksonomies The Read-Write Web

24 WEB 2.0 (term coined by O'Reilly – not necessarily the best term to describe the paradigm) READ/WRITE WEB SOCIAL WEB MEDIA

25 SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE AND WEB 2.0

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28 SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE AND WEB 2.0 SaaS generally refers to business applications Web 2.0 for consumer/entertainment software gaining steam 1999/2000 and on current paradigm

29 SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE web native (require only the browser software) upgrades and patches are made centrally - no need for customer to be involved web analytics, , accounting software, etc.

30 SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE Data is secure on a managed server You don't need to own or manage the server Pay a monthly fee instead of buying the software Quick implementation

31 SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE Takes control out of your hands How customizable is it? Accessed via Internet – security or loss of connection become issues

32 SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE Trade secrets, customer lists, and competitive intelligence must be carefully guarded. Violations of regulations and privacy laws are always a concern when data is in the hands of others. Whoever controls the data will be responsible for it and will be held accountable for any data that might be evidence in court cases. Phil Hippensteel, Rolling Review: Web 2.0 Tools Demand A Cautious Approach

33 WEB 2.0 Web 2.0 is the business revolution in the computer industry caused by the move to the Internet as a platform, and an attempt to understand the rules for success on that new platform. - Tim O'Reilly

34 WEB 2.0 not a totally new technical specification a change in how developers make things and how users interact with the web

35 WEB 2.0 Web 2.0 is the business revolution in the computer industry caused by the move to the Internet as a platform, and an attempt to understand the rules for success on that new platform. - Tim O'Reilly

36 WEB 2.0 Tim O'Reilly's examples Level 3 Level 2 Level 1 Level 0 Source for this section Web 2.0 Wiipedia article

37 WEB 2.0 * Level-3 applications, the most "Web 2.0"- oriented, exist only on the Internet, deriving their effectiveness from the inter-human connections and from the network effects that Web 2.0 makes possible, and growing in effectiveness in proportion as people make more use of them. O'Reilly gave eBay, Craigslist, Wikipedia, del.icio.us, Skype, dodgeball and AdSense as examples.

38 WEB 2.0 * Level-2 applications can operate offline but gain advantages from going online. O'Reilly cited Flickr, which benefits from its shared photo-database and from its community-generated tag database.

39 WEB 2.0 * Level-1 applications operate offline but gain features online. O'Reilly pointed to Writely (now Google Docs & Spreadsheets) and iTunes (because of its music-store portion).

40 WEB 2.0 * Level-0 applications work as well offline as online. O'Reilly gave the examples of MapQuest, Yahoo! Local, and Google Maps (mapping- applications using contributions from users to advantage could rank as "level 2", like Google Earth). Non-web applications like , instant-messaging clients, and the telephone fall outside the above hierarchy.

41 WEB 2.0 Network Effect The network becomes more valuable/more useful as more people use it...

42 WEB 2.0 Network Effect The network becomes more valuable/more useful as more people use it... examples: telephone system social networking sites wikipedia

43 WEB 2.0 Negative effects of increased use of a network: congestion need for improvements to infrastructure vendor lock-in (ex: qwerty keyboard, costs of leaving a social networking site) network provider complacency

44 WEB 2.0 USER-GENERATED CONTENT video uploads blog entries status messages photos lists

45 WEB 2.0 USER-GENERATED CONTENT comments rankings

46 WEB 2.0 USER-GENERATED CONTENT also... what you click on who you friend what you purchase

47 WEB 2.0 OTHER INFORMATION YOU GENERATE WHEN USING A SITE: what you don't click on who you don't friend when and how often you visit the site usage patterns across multiple sites

48 WEB 2.0

49 "[the] move from personal websites to blogs and blog site aggregation, from publishing to participation, from web content as the outcome of large up-front investment to an ongoing and interactive process, and from content management systems to links based on tagging (folksonomy)" Terry Flew, 3rd Edition of New Media

50 WEB 2.0 entertainment 2.0 government 2.0 education 2.0 shopping 2.0 church 2.0 dating 2.0 civics 2.0 travel 2.0 family 2.0 memory 2.0

51 key terms and concepts network effects network effect The Read-Write Web The Read-Only Web time sharing Software as a Service Web 2.0 Folksonomies

52 SOURCES Wikipedia – SaaS Wikipedia – Web 2.0 Where Wizards Stay Up Late – Hafner & Lyon Wikipedia – Network Effect Beware the Hype for Software as a Service Rolling Review: Web 2.0 Tools Demand A Cautious Approach - Phil Hippensteel


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