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Government of Nunavut Presentation to the Newmont Hope Bay Project Mineral Development Advisory Group October 26-28, 2010 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Government of Nunavut Presentation to the Newmont Hope Bay Project Mineral Development Advisory Group October 26-28, 2010 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Government of Nunavut Presentation to the Newmont Hope Bay Project Mineral Development Advisory Group October 26-28,

2 Department of Finance Roles and Responsibilities 2

3 Four main taxes apply Income Tax Payroll Tax Fuel Tax Property Tax 12% corporate rate No mining-specific taxes or credits 2% of employment earnings Normally deducted from paycheques ¢ per litre by fuel type Levied on imported fuel as well as fuel purchased in Nunavut Fuel-Tax Rebate Program available 9.76 mills (0.976%) on assessed value of property

4 GN offers fuel-tax rebate Any Nunavut-registered company may be eligible annually for a rebate on taxes paid for fuel used in: – Licensed prospecting – Mine development – Mineral extraction – Mine reclamation Fuel for which taxes were paid must have been either: – Purchased in Nunavut – Imported in accordance with Petroleum Products Tax Act 4 ! Companies must sign a DPA with the GN before obtaining a rebate

5 Training tax credit in development Any large company physically operating in Nunavut may be eligible for a refundable income-tax credit of up to $50,000 annually for: – Onsite training – Offsite training – Distance training Training programs must be: – Pre-approved by GN Finance – Relevant to the employee’s current or future job duties 5 Taxation Sector: ! Companies must register with GN Finance for payroll tax

6 Finance has further responsibilities If there is intention to lease Commissioner’s Land: – GN Community and Government Services consults with GN Finance on financial-security provisions If there is intention to negotiate a DPA: – GN Economic Development and Transportation consults with GN Finance on DPA provisions – GN Finance participates in monitoring compliance to determine eligibility for fuel-tax rebate If there is intention to make tobacco products available (e.g. at a company store): – GN Finance issues licenses and collects tobacco taxes If there is intention to make liquor products available (e.g. at a licensed company cafeteria): – GN Finance issues import permits and conducts inspections 6

7 Department of Economic Development and Transportation Roles and Responsibilities 7

8 Development Partnership Agreements  An instrument that the GN can use to engage major project proponents in programs of mutual benefit – the GN can offer direction on plans of development or monitoring that can be beneficial to Nunavummiut during or after the life of a project.  Ensures that maximum benefits from economic development initiatives accrue to Nunavut residents, businesses, and communities.  Results-oriented with clearly defined outcomes and measurable benefits 8 Nunavut Mining Strategy: The Government of Nunavut encourages companies proposing mining developments in Nunavut to negotiate a Development Partnership Agreement (DPA).

9 9 A DPA focuses on 5 strategic areas: 1. Infrastructure Development 2. Education and Training 3. Local Employment 4. Business Development 5. Community Development Through a DPA, the GN can work with industry to coordinate:  Infrastructure development through shared facilities or transfer of ownership  Training programs and community business development initiatives  Socio-economic monitoring and mitigation

10 Negotiating a DPA:  Between the project proponent and the GN, led by the Department of Economic Development and Transportation  Process can commence once a project has been referred to an Environmental Review. –Proponents can express formal interest after the project has been referred to a Part 5 or Part 6 review by NIRB - This initiates the process.  Negotiations can occur during the development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). –ED&T recommends that proponents initiate negotiations as early as possible in order to discuss potential DPA provisions that can compliment their EIS.  A DPA can be signed once a Project Certificate is issued. 10

11  Negotiating a DPA is voluntary –Proponents must sign a DPA and submit annual reports to claim the Territorial Fuel Tax Rebate –A DPA provides proponents with a means of engaging the GN in planning infrastructure and reducing reclamation costs should the facilities be deemed an asset to the territory after mine operations.  A DPA is not intended to duplicate Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreements, but rather compliment them.  The GN currently has one DPA in place, with Agnico-Eagle 11

12 Socio-Economic Monitoring  Socio-Economic Monitoring Committees (SEMC) coordinate the required monitoring responsibilities and programs contained within any terms or conditions issued by NIRB.  Regional SEMCs were established in 2007 through collaboration with the GN and INAC and endorsed by NIRB to replace project certificate requirements for project-specific monitoring programs.  Advantages of a Regional approach:  Efficient way of bringing stakeholders to the table to discuss issues  Ensures consistency of socio-economic monitoring in the territory  Improves the monitoring of cumulative effects by major project activity  Added value of community involvement 12

13  ED&T has been the GN lead on the regional SEMCs  The ED&T Regional Directors of Community Operations have been acting Chairs of their respective regional committee.  SEMC members include the GN, INAC, Project Proponents, Inuit Organizations, and Communities 13

14 Doris North socio-economic monitoring:  Condition 28 of the Doris North Gold Mine Project Certificate states that a Hope Bay Belt SEMC shall be formed. -The SEMC is to include the same membership as the Kitikmeot regional SEMC and must engage with the affected communities.  The company has proposed to establish the Doris North Socio-Economic Monitoring Program in compliance with the NIRB project certificate.  The GN continues to support a single regional SEMC approach as the practical way to meet project certificate requirements in an efficient and consistent manner -However, we recognize that the existing Doris North Project specific socio- economic monitoring program will allow the proponent to fulfill the requirements of the project certificate with the support of the Kitikmeot Inuit Association.  The GN anticipates that the project-specific socio-economic program will eventually be incorporated into the regional SEMC.  The GN has been collecting socio-economic information for the regional SEMCs for over a year, and will be able to provide this information to the Doris North SEMP. 14

15 Nunavut Mine Training Roundtable  Established by ED&T, the Department of Education and Nunavut Arctic College, with participation from industry, Inuit Organizations, INAC, and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)  Goal: Establish a Nunavut-wide organization to coordinate mine training –Identify needs, priorities –Secure funding for training programs  Review training project proposals and make recommendations to the GN for allocating the Training Fund 15

16 Objectives:  Provide Nunavummiut with training opportunities that lead to jobs in the mining industry  Coordinate training programs to reduce costs and maximize participation  Present a united voice for Nunavut and lobby for funding from other sources  Encourage and support the development of training infrastructure in Nunavut 16

17 Industry Participation:  Roundtable members determine when to invite an industry member to participate  Generally: –Prospecting/Early Exploration – Representation at the Roundtable is by the Chamber of Mines –Advanced Exploration and Development - Some companies will be invited to sit on the Roundtable while others will be kept informed about the Roundtable’s purpose and activities – Early involvement by providing info about training needs and employment opportunities. –Operation - These companies should be sitting members of the Mine Training Roundtable. –Reclamation - Companies are expected to continue participating as Roundtable members.  Agnico-Eagle, Baffinland, Newmont, and AREVA have all joined the table as industry members 17

18 Department of Environment (DOE) Roles and Responsibilities 18

19 Overview Role of DOE in Environmental Assessment DOE Interests Legislative Expectations October 6,

20 Roles and Responsibilities October 6, Protection Promotion Sustainable Use

21 October 6, Summary of DOE Interests Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste ManagementLegislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts

22 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife Habitat Trans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste ManagementLegislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts DOE Interests

23 October 6, Wildlife Wildlife/Wildlife Habitat Trans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste ManagementLegislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts Wildlife Act Section 117 (1): No person shall conduct research on wildlife or collect wildlife specimens for research without a license authorizing it. Section 73(1): No person shall, unless authorized by a permit, engage in any activity, other than harvesting, that is likely to result in a significant disturbance to a substantial number of wildlife

24 October 6, Wildlife

25 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency Planning Abandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material Management Water Quality Waste Management Legislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air & Water Quality Alternative Analysis Noise Appropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts DOE Interests

26 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency Planning Abandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material Management Water Quality Waste Management Legislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air & Water Quality Alternative Analysis Noise Appropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts Environmental Protection land Environmental Protection Act Section 5: No person shall discharge or permit the discharge of a contaminant into the environment land

27 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency Planning Abandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material Management Water Quality Waste Management Legislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air & Water Quality Alternative Analysis Noise Appropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts land Environmental Protection Act Section 5: No person shall discharge or permit the discharge of a contaminant into the environment land CCME Canada-Wide Standards (CWS)  Dioxins and Furans  Mercury Emissions  Particulate Matter and Ozone  Petroleum Hydrocarbons (PHC) in Soil Environmental Protection

28 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste Management Legislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts DOE Interests

29 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste Management Legislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts Legislation & Regulations land Spill Contingency Planning and Reporting Regulations Contingency Planning and Spill Reporting in Nunavut: A Guide to the New Regulations Guideline for Dust Suppression Guideline for the General Management of Hazardous Waste in Nunavut Guideline for Air Quality - Sulphur Dioxide & Suspended Particulates Guideline for the Management of Waste Antifreeze Guideline for the Management of Waste Batteries Guideline for the Management of Waste Paint Guideline for the Management of Waste Solvents Disposal Guidelines for Fluorescent Lamp Tubes (Policy)

30 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste ManagementLegislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of Impacts Monitoring of Impacts DOE Interests

31 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste ManagementLegislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of Impacts Monitoring of Impacts Terrestrial Wildlife Monitoring Programs Ensures that the proponent is accountable for predicted impacts Provides concrete evidence of environmental outcomes Allows for the transition from theory (predictions) to understanding Results from these programs contribute to better environmental management L and Monitoring

32 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects Vegetation Climate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste ManagementLegislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts DOE Interests

33 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects Vegetation Climate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste ManagementLegislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts Climate Change Incorporation into Project Designs Greenhouse Gas Emissions & Ozone-..Depleting Substances Land land

34 October 6, Wildlife/Wildlife HabitatTrans-Boundary Effects VegetationClimate Change Considerations Spill Contingency PlanningAbandonment & Restoration Hazardous Material ManagementWater Quality Waste ManagementLegislation & Regulatory Context/Compliance Air QualityAlternative Analysis NoiseAppropriate Baseline Data Relative to Impacts Cumulative Effects AnalysisImpact Analysis Management & Mitigation of ImpactsMonitoring of Impacts A Summary of DOE Interests

35 Department of Culture Language Elders and Youth (CLEY) Roles and Responsibilities 35

36 CLEY Roles and Responsibilities Nunavut Act (Nunavut Archaeological and Palaeontological Sites Regulations), Historical Resources Act Nunavut Land Claims Agreement (Article 33) 36

37 CLEY Roles and Responsibilities Ensures that proponent has a professional archaeologist survey all areas of proposed ground disturbance well in advance of development plans and that archaeological resources are inventoried and impacts are assessed and mitigation plans proposed Reviews proponent’s proposed mitigation and management plans and ensure they are appropriate Reviews traditional knowledge and Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit components of the EIS through Tuutarviit and/or IQK 37

38 Department of Health and Social Services (H&SS) Roles and Responsibilities 38

39 H&SS: Roles and Responsibilities Public Health Act and Regulations – Act Sec – Camp Sanitation Regulations – Public Sewage System Regulations – Water System Regulations – Communicable Disease Regulation – Eating of Drinking Places Regulations 39

40 H&SS: Roles and Responsibilities Emergency Medical Aid Act Hospital Insurance and H&SS Administration Act Child and Family Services Act 40

41 Department of Community and Government Services (CGS) Roles and Responsibilities 41

42 CGS: Roles and Responsibilities Regulatory Responsibilities – Protective Services Code compliance Building, fire, mechanical, electrical, etc. Fuel storage facilities – Commissioner’s Land Administration Administering Commissioner’s Land in accord with the Commissioner’s Land Act and the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Land use permits, leases, quarries 42

43 CGS: Roles and Responsibilities Regulatory Responsibilities (continued) – Community Land Use Planning Approval of community plans and development 43 Community Development By fostering self-reliance through initiatives like training that develop the capacity of communities to operate their own services such as water delivery, solid waste sites, municipal administration.

44 CGS: Roles and Responsibilities Community Infrastructure Delivery – Capital Planning and Project Management Water Wastewater Systems Territorial Government and Hamlet Buildings Design and Construction of Building Infrastructure( Health Centres, Schools, Community Halls, Fire Halls, Maintenance Garages, Offices etc.) Airport Buildings Aggregate Resources Municipal Solid Waste Facilities Constructing Breakwaters, Roads, Bridges, Docks 44

45 CGS: Roles and Responsibilities Advisory Roles – Community Development Administrative and financial capacity – Municipal Services Increased demands from development – Petroleum Products Managing fuel resources in communities and airports – Technical Services Advice for infrastructure projects Capital Planning; provide Technical advice; Technical evaluations on infrastructure. 45

46 Department of Education Roles and Responsibilities 46

47 Education: Roles and Responsibilities Primary Relevant Roles and Authorities Apprenticeship, Trade and Occupations Act and Regulations – Certification for tradespersons – Accreditation of programs and sites Bi-lateral Agreements with the Government of Canada to fund training programs – Labour Market Agreement (LMA) – Labour Market Development Agreement (LMDA) (for Employment Insurance (EI) eligible clients only Forum of Labour Market Ministers – discussion on labour market issues for provinces, territories and the federal government Nunavut Adult Learning Strategy – The vision and plan for adult education in Nunavut 47

48 Education: Roles and Responsibilities Department of Education Services Service delivery through regional offices in – Cambridge Bay ( ) – Rankin Inlet ( ) – Pangnirtung ( ) – Career Development officers in many communities Services include: – Training programs – Career development – Labour market assistance – Income support – Apprenticeship support Manager of Labour Market Programs ( ) 48

49 Contacts Department of Finance Anthony Speca, A/Director, Fiscal Policy PH: (867) Daniel Young, A/Manager, Taxation PH: (867) Department of Economic Development and Transportation Dianne Lapierre, Manager Environmental Assessment and Regulation PH: (867) Kitikmeot Regional Office PH  867) John Hawkins, Director, Transportation PH: (867) Department of Environment: Dee Karadag, Territorial Environmental Assessment Coordinator/Scientist PH: (867) Allison Loder, Environmental Assessment Analyst PH: (867) Department of Culture, Language, Elders and Youth Julie Ross, Chief Archaeologist PH: (867) Department of Health and Social Services Peter Workman, Environmental Health Consultant PH: (867) Department of Community and Government Services Shane Slifka, Regional Project Manager PH (867) Department of Education Brad Chambers, Director, Policy and Planning PH: (867) Brenda Jancke, Director, Career and Early Childhood Services PH: (867) Department of Executive and Intergovernmental Affairs Marie Duchaine, Avatiliriniq Coordinator PH: (867)


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