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NY-070626.001/020419VtsimSL001 Overview of the Global Fund & its Financing Activities.

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Presentation on theme: "NY-070626.001/020419VtsimSL001 Overview of the Global Fund & its Financing Activities."— Presentation transcript:

1 NY /020419VtsimSL001 Overview of the Global Fund & its Financing Activities

2 NY /020419VtsimSL001 1 What is the Global Fund? A financial instrument, not an implementing agency, aiming to dramatically increase resources available to fight HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria in countries in need and contribute to poverty reduction The largest global fund of its kind, with US$ 5.4 billion currently pledged through 2008 by donor countries, foundations and the private sector A public-private partnership based in Geneva to serve as a partner to governments, NGOs and international agencies in the coordinated fight against the world’s deadliest diseases A financial instrument, not an implementing agency, aiming to dramatically increase resources available to fight HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria in countries in need and contribute to poverty reduction The largest global fund of its kind, with US$ 5.4 billion currently pledged through 2008 by donor countries, foundations and the private sector A public-private partnership based in Geneva to serve as a partner to governments, NGOs and international agencies in the coordinated fight against the world’s deadliest diseases

3 NY /020419VtsimSL001 2 HIV/AIDSMalariaTB"Other support“ 2 TotalDomestic financing 3 Donor resource requirements Required AIDS, TB and malaria investment in US$ billion 1Limited to 85 countries with GDP per capita lower than US$ 1,200 per year 2Includes strengthening of management systems, absorptive capacity, quality of national health care systems 3CMH Assumption: countries can spend on average 0.65% more of their GNI on the three diseases by 2007 Source:Commission on Macroeconomics and Health, December 2001 The Global Fund was created in January 2002 to fill a substantial global resource shortfall to fight AIDS, TB and malaria US$ 5.4 billion in additional resources has been committed to the Global Fund to date

4 NY /020419VtsimSL001 3 Recognizing the urgent need for an expanded response to the three epidemics, the global community demanded the creation of a global fund 2000JulyG8 endorse new AIDS, TB and malaria targets in Okinawa 2001AprilAfrican leaders commit to greater response in Abuja JuneEndorsement of the need for a global fund at UNGASS JulyOver US$ 1.5 billion in pledges made by G8 in Genoa OctoberTransitional Working Group established in Brussels 2002JanuaryGlobal Fund created at first Board meeting AprilFirst round of proposals approved at second Board meeting JulyExecutive Director assumes role NovemberInitial disbursements of grants commence Total funding available through 2008: US$ 5.4 billion. Total grants approved: US$ 2.1 billion JuneAdditional funding pledges made by G8 in Evian 2003JanuarySecond round of proposals approved at fourth Board meeting OctoberThird round of proposals approved at sixth Board meeting 2004AprilInvitation for fourth round proposals closes on 5 April 2004

5 NY /020419VtsimSL001 4 The mandate of the Global Fund is to raise and disburse large amounts of additional resources to achieve impact against the three diseases Raise it Spend it Prove it

6 NY /020419VtsimSL001 5 The Global Fund adds value to existing international efforts by providing additional resources to effective country-driven programs through public-private partnerships  Additional resources for the three diseases US$ 5.4 billion has been pledged to the Global Fund to date Non-traditional ODA sources include private foundations and corporations – resource mobilization efforts on-going  Broadened public / private partnerships At the country level, public sector, NGOs, development partners and private sector participate in a country-led coordination mechanism for proposal design and implementation The Global Fund itself is governed by a Board with representation from donor and recipient governments, NGOs, communities, foundations and private sector  Performance-based funding aligned with harmonization efforts The Global Fund encourages grant recipients to focus on results rather than on inputs Use of grant recipients existing systems are encouraged as well as common/harmonized donor arrangements

7 NY /020419VtsimSL001 6 HIV/AIDS coverage after three rounds of proposals * Anguilla (territory), Antigua & Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin Islands (territory), Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat (territory), St. Lucia, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago. ** Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kirbati, Niue, Palau, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu Burundi Chad Comoros Eritrea Ethiopia Iran Kenya Lesotho Madagascar Malawi Mozambique Sudan Swaziland Tanzania Uganda Zimbabwe Armenia Belarus Jordan Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Moldova Russian Federation Tajikistan Ukraine Uzbekistan Yemen Bulgaria Croatia Estonia Georgia Macedonia Romania Serbia Afghanistan Bangladesh Cambodia China India Indonesia Laos Mongolia Myanmar Nepal Pakistan Philippines Thailand Vietnam Western Pacific Islands** Benin Botswana Central African Republic Congo (Dem Rep) Ghana Namibia Nigeria South Africa Zambia Argentina Belize Bolivia Chile Colombia Costa Rica Cuba Dominican Republic Ecuador El Salvador Guatemala Guyana Haiti Honduras Jamaica Nicaragua Peru Suriname Multi-country Americas* Algeria Burkina Faso Cameroon Côte d’Ivoire Gabon Gambia Guinea Liberia Morocco Niger Rwanda Senegal Togo

8 NY /020419VtsimSL001 7 Malaria coverage after three rounds of proposals * Andean Region: Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela ** Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kirbati, Niue, Palau, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu Bolivia Guyana Haïti Honduras Multi-country Americas (Andean)* Afghanistan Georgia Pakistan Somalia Sudan Yemen Cambodia China East Timor Indonesia Korea DPR Laos Myanmar Nepal Papua New Guinea Philippines Sri Lanka Thailand Vietnam Western Pacific Islands** Angola Benin Burkina Faso Burundi Cameroon Chad Comoros Congo (Dem Rep) Eritrea Ethiopia Gambia Ghana Guinea Kenya Liberia Madagascar Malawi Mali Mauritania Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Rwanda Senegal Swaziland Tanzania Togo Uganda Zambia Zimbabwe

9 NY /020419VtsimSL001 8 Benin Cameroon Chad Congo (Dem Rep) Côte d’Ivoire Ethiopia Ghana Guinea-Bissau Kenya Lesotho Liberia Mauritania Mozambique Namibia Rwanda (HIV/TB) Sierre Leone Somalia South Africa (HIV/TB) Sudan Swaziland Tanzania Togo Uganda Zambia Afghanistan (integrated) Kyrgyzstan Moldova (HIV/TB) Romania Russian Federation Serbia Tajikistan Tuberculosis coverage after three rounds of proposals ** Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kirbati, Niue, Palau, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu Bolivia Dominican Republic El Salvador Haïti Honduras Nicaragua Panama Paraguay Peru Bangladesh East Timor India Indonesia Korea, DPR Laos Mongolia Myanmar Philippines Sri Lanka Thailand Vietnam

10 NY /020419VtsimSL001 9 Almost half of approved grants are for Africa with substantial funding also for other affected regions South Asia, Middle East & North Africa (6%) Sub-Saharan Africa (59%) East Asia, South East Asia, Oceania (14%) Latin America (12%) Eastern Europe & Central Asia (8%) *Percentages may not add up to 100 due to rounding

11 NY /020419VtsimSL Tuberculosis (16%) Malaria (24%) HIV/AIDS (60%) 60% of Global Fund grants are for HIV/AIDS with substantial funding for the other two diseases

12 NY /020419VtsimSL Expected outcomes for grants approved in Rounds 1, 2 and 3 include significant progress in the fight against the three diseases HIV/AIDS: More than 700,000 people will receive antiretroviral treatment, tripling current coverage in developing countries (11-fold increase in Sub-Saharan Africa) 12-fold increase in current voluntary counseling and testing coverage (40 million clients) Tuberculosis: 3 million additional tuberculosis cases will be detected and an equal number successfully treated with DOTS (the internationally approved treatment strategy for TB) 13 million new treatments for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis will be provided Malaria: 22 million combination drug treatments for resistant malaria will be delivered 64 million bed nets will be financed to protect from transmission of malaria (16-fold increase from current coverage)

13 NY /020419VtsimSL Faith-based organizations (4%) Half of grant proceeds will go to the public sector and half will go to non-public sector entities* Private sector (5%) People living with HIV/TB/malaria (3%) Government (50%) Other (6%) NGOs (29%) Academic & educational organizations (3%) * Rounds 2 and 3 only. Information not available for Round 1

14 NY /020419VtsimSL Almost half of the grants will finance drug and commodities purchases. Major investments will be made in strengthening capacity. Physical Infrastructure (15%) Administration (4%) Drugs & Commodities (46%) Other (5%) Human Resources & Training (25%) Monitoring & Evaluation (5%)

15 NY /020419VtsimSL The Global Fund’s model for grant accountability aims to find the right balance between key priorities Sustainability/ Ownership AccountabilitySpeed Rely on local stakeholders at the country level to implement programs and manage grant proceeds Encourage the use of existing standards and processes Monitor and evaluate programs and make decisions on future funding based on performance and accountability Promote rapid release of funds to assist target populations

16 NY /020419VtsimSL National Health Strategies SWAps At the country level, linkages have to be ensured with national strategies and broader development frameworks PRSP Mainstream development frameworks National AIDS Strategies MAP Bilateral programs Foundations UN funded programs National TB Strategies National Malaria Strategies NAC MDGs UNGASS CCM Government Multi-/Bilateral Development Partners NGOs/CBOs PLW Diseases Private sector Religious/ Faith-Based Organizations Academic/ Educational Sector

17 NY /020419VtsimSL Global Fund Approval Technical review Screening There are multiple partners to the Global Fund’s grant program arrangements Secretariat Sub- recipients Trustee (World Bank) Instruction to disburse Grant agreement Advice Reports Government Multi-/Bilateral Development Partners NGOs/CBOs PLW Diseases Private sector Religious/ Faith-Based Organizations Academic/ Educational Sector Country Coordination Mechanism Provides technical and capacity building support Proposal Prepares and submits proposals Assessment Funds Reports Oversees implementation Local Fund Agent Contract Principal Recipient(s) Selects Principal Recipient(s) Requests continued funding from the Global Fund for years 3-5 Technical Review Panel Board

18 NY /020419VtsimSL The signings of grant agreements and disbursements to countries accelerated rapidly in 2003 Grant Agreements Disbursements Note:Figures reflect totals at the end of each month from December 2002, when the first grant agreements were signed 31 March 2004: 149 grant agreements signed with 81 countries US$ 284 million disbursed to 77 countries December 2002 – March 2004

19 NY /020419VtsimSL The Global Fund’s First Biennial Partnership Forum 7-8 July 2004 in Bangkok, just before the XV International AIDS Conference in Bangkok, July 2004 A broad-based consultative process An opportunity for feedback from stakeholders and open debate on issues Close linkage with capacity-building and training


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