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Adapted with permission from Melanie Learoyd & Morag Kelley North Vancouver School Board May 9, 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Adapted with permission from Melanie Learoyd & Morag Kelley North Vancouver School Board May 9, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Adapted with permission from Melanie Learoyd & Morag Kelley North Vancouver School Board May 9, 2009

2 “In a diverse classroom, no single method can reach all learners. Multiple pathways to achieving goals are needed.” Source: Hitchcock,

3 Teaching Content to All 3 Open-ended teaching Adapted Modified Source: Brownlie & King

4 Universal Design Origin in the field of architecture. Stairs are the access most of us have to buildings. Historically, architects have designed buildings to be accessible for the majority of people, but not for all people. For some people stairs are a barrier to access: people in wheelchairs, people on roller blades, mothers using baby strollers. 4

5 Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Shapes teaching to provide all students access to the curriculum. Sees that every learner is unique and will benefit from a flexible curriculum. 5

6 The Challenge of Learners with Diverse Needs 6 or Redesign the curriculum? Retrofit the curriculum? “fix” the child “fix” the curriculum goals assessments methods materials so that it can meet diverse learner needs The Goal…

7 1 2 3 Guiding Principles Multiple means of engagement to tap into learners' interests, offer appropriate challenges, & increase motivation Multiple means of processing to give learners various ways of acquiring information & knowledge Multiple means of expression to provide learners alternatives for demonstrating what they know 7

8 The Gradual Release Model Model Guided practice Independent practice Independent application 8 Source: Pearson,1982

9 Differentiated Instruction 9

10 Why Differentiate? All kids are different. One size does not fit all. Differentiation provides all students with access to all curriculum. 10

11 What is Differentiation? “To differentiate instruction is to recognize students’ varying background knowledge, readiness, learning styles, and interests, and to respond to these differences.” 11

12 Comparing Traditional & Differentiated Classrooms 12

13 Student Differences Traditional: Student differences are addressed when they become a problem. Differentiated: Differences become the basis for planning & instruction. 13

14 Assessment Traditional: Summative (end of unit). Differentiated: Diagnostic & formative so instruction responds to the learner. 14

15 Interest/Learning Style Traditional: Interest and learning style rarely inform instruction. Differentiated: Students are guided in making interest & learning profile-based choices; instruction is based around the ways students learn. 15

16 Instruction Traditional: Much of instruction is whole-class. Differentiated: Many instructional groupings and arrangements. 16

17 Assignments Traditional: Students are usually given the same assignment to complete. Differentiated: Multi-option assignments are provided, allowing choices for demonstrating learning. 17

18 Factors Guiding Instruction Traditional: A single curriculum guide or text is often used. Differentiated: Student readiness, interest, and learning profile guide instruction that incorporates multiple materials; curriculum guides & standards are still used, but supplemented by other materials. 18

19 What can we differentiate? 19

20 ContentProcessProduct According to Students’ Readiness Interest Learning Profile We Can Differentiate Adapted from The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of All Learners (Tomlinson, 1999). 20

21 Content Differentiate the actual content of the material being presented to the students. Example: Some students may be learning single-digit multiplication facts, while others are learning to multiply two- or three-digit numbers 21 What do you teach?

22 Process How the student learns what is being taught Example: Some students need to interact with the material in a hands-on manner, some might prefer to read a book or interact with material on the computer 22 How do you teach?

23 Product How the student shows what he/she has learned. Example: Students can write a paper or they can present information orally 23 How do you assess learning?

24 Assessment in the Differentiated Classroom Ongoing Instruction-dependent Student-dependent Informative for continued instruction. 24

25 Building Student Profiles 25

26 ContentProcessProduct According to Students’ Readiness Interest Learning Profile We Can Differentiate Adapted from The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of All Learners (Tomlinson, 1999). 26

27 Readiness Background knowledge and skill level. Example: some students may be ready to read text at a fifth-grade level, while others are ready to read text at a third-grade level 27 What do they know?

28 Assessing Readiness Diagnostic assessments (formal or informal) Pre-tests Informal questioning of background knowledge KWL (Know, Want to Know, Learn) 28 What do they know?

29 Interest Student’s interest or preferences: Interest inventories. Inclusion in planning process. Specific interests in a particular topic to motivate the student. 29 What do they enjoy?

30 Learning Profile Learning Styles: Learning style inventories (visual, auditory, tactile, kinesthetic). Observing student activities. 30 How do they learn best (style)?


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