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S. Torres, D. Spitzer, A. Beboso, C. Bernandino, N. Berkes, J. Pallard & A. Calzado.

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Presentation on theme: "S. Torres, D. Spitzer, A. Beboso, C. Bernandino, N. Berkes, J. Pallard & A. Calzado."— Presentation transcript:

1 S. Torres, D. Spitzer, A. Beboso, C. Bernandino, N. Berkes, J. Pallard & A. Calzado.

2 Findings Separation: Personal sacrifices … And still um, when they came here, it’s like a feeling of you’re competing...from, you know, their feelings. You’re, you’re trying to gain back..., their feeling. But, it’s ah, I made a very, very, difficult decision in my life... Elvira

3 Findings Reunification: Formal & Informal Support A small number of family members received formal support from non-governmental agencies The majority of family members received informal support from: Spouses/mothers Extended relatives Filipino church Former LCP workers Former LCP employers

4 Findings Attachment to Canada: Relationships between couples I think the greatest challenge would be, to get back to my profession. And... you know, go to school. And then, the breadwinner, too, you know. Like, which is which? So, if you go to school...you'll be focused there, you know, you gotta be full-time there. So that means you're not the breadwinner, eh, those things, eh. Raphael

5 Findings Attachment to Canada: Relationships between mothers and children So … it takes only two years or three years and then I can be able to have them here but then I was wrong. I miss a lot of things.... then, of course when they came here I don’t know what they’re thinking but they were telling me “why you leave us”... Elvira

6 Findings Attachment to Canada: Settlement, savings, and housing strategies Most workers and families felt that they were settling into their new cities The majority of workers and spouses spoke of owning a home in Canada, or having that as a goal in the near future

7 Discussion If you had the choice, would like to migrate to another country leaving your family behind for an extended period of time that you cannot control? Individual, community, and societal factors affect the separation, reunification and settlement of Filipino families

8 Discussion Gender and globalization intersect with factors such as class and ethnicity to make Filipino family’s separation, reunification, and adaptation invisible to policy-makers and Canadians in general

9 Policy implications Permanent Resident status Workers are Permanent Residents upon arrival Family members receive Permanent Resident status at the same time as the worker

10 Policy implications Contract Workers are tied to a ‘sector’ not to an ‘employer’ This restriction would be only applicable until workers complete the mandatory 24 months of the “ foreign caregivers” program Permanent Resident status granted without restrictions

11 Conclusions Families are excited about finally being reunited in Canada Filipino transnational families’ struggles related reunification and settlement are often invisible to policy-makers and Canadians in general

12 Thank you Questions?


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