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PHILOSOPHIES OF OFFICIATING PRESENTATION TO CANADA CUP OFFICIALS - JULY 2012 Murray Drinkwalter – Lakeshore Football Officials Association.

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Presentation on theme: "PHILOSOPHIES OF OFFICIATING PRESENTATION TO CANADA CUP OFFICIALS - JULY 2012 Murray Drinkwalter – Lakeshore Football Officials Association."— Presentation transcript:

1 PHILOSOPHIES OF OFFICIATING PRESENTATION TO CANADA CUP OFFICIALS - JULY 2012 Murray Drinkwalter – Lakeshore Football Officials Association

2 THE PROCESS Based on NCAA document Review of certain rules and situations Discussion and agreement on the interpretation of those rules and situations Agreement on philosophy to act as a guiding principle for all amateur football officials in Ontario

3 THE PHILOSOPHERS Murray Taylor – OFOA President 50 yrs officiating / 40 yrs OUA Panel Al Kirkpatrick – OUA Referee 26 yrs officiating / 16 yrs OUA Panel Kevin Mickleboro – OUA Referee 27 yrs officiating / 19 yrs OUA Panel Murray Drinkwalter – OUA Referee 27 yrs officiating / 12 yrs OUA Panel Bill Szigeti – OUA Referee 14 yrs officiating / 8 yrs OUA Panel Kevin Baird – OUA Side Official 18 yrs officiating / 2 yr OUA Panel Ken Green – OUA R.I.C. 56 yrs officiating / 19 yrs OUA Panel / 22 yrs OUA RIC

4 DEFINITIONS Rule : One of a set of explicit or understood regulations or principles governing conduct within a particular activity or sphere Interpretation: An explanation or way of explaining Philosophy : A theory or attitude held by a person or organization that acts as a guiding principle for behaviour

5 TOPICS Blocking & Holding Line of Scrimmage Pass Interference (Dpi & Opi) Passing Situations Kicking Unnecessary Roughness/Rough Play/DQs Miscellaneous

6 Rule Interpretations Each association across the country has their own ‘rules gurus’ that we depend upon. Each guru or association may have own interpretation of a specific rule or situation. Process was developed to ensure consistency.

7 BLOCKING AND HOLDING

8 Holding, blocking, and takedowns at the point of attack, those in the open field, and those affecting the result of the play, create special focus and will be called in these situations.

9 If there is a potential offensive or defensive holding foul but the action occurs away from the point of attack, and has no (or could have no) affect on the play, holding will not be called.

10 For illegal blocks and blocks from the rear the initial contact must be on the back. The severity of the actions of the offending player (push vs. block) defines the foul.

11 Severe contact away from the play on a player who is not defending himself, or is not participating in the play shall be called unnecessary roughness or RP.

12 Blocks in the back away from the play shall be called unnecessary roughness.

13 Rarely will you have a hold on a double team block unless there is a takedown, or the defender breaks the double team and is pulled back.

14 If there is uncertainty as to whether an illegal block occurs in the EZ or the FOP; rule that it occurs in the FOP.

15 LINE OF SCRIMMAGE

16 1.Offensive line players, tackle to tackle, must have their head and shoulder within a yard of the LOS at the snap. 2.The two ends on the line may not necessarily have both shoulders within the yard. 3.Receivers, (not ends) in motion towards the opponent’s goal line can be within 1 yard of the LOS as long as he is not offside. This does not affect the eligibility of any receiver. 4.Don’t be technical. If there is any uncertainty, it is not a foul.

17 Officials will work to keep linemen and receivers legal and will call a foul only when it is obvious or where warnings are ignored. Don’t wait till the 4th quarter to enforce rule.

18 Work with both offensive and defensive players early in the game to ensure they are lining up properly. (pro-active officiating)

19 Defensive linemen moving forward at the snap must be at the least, in the neutral zone to be called for offside. Moving forward on their side of the neutral zone is not a foul. Defensive line men who have entered the neutral zone and are retreating at the snap of the ball shall not be called for offside.

20 When a defensive player moves into the neutral zone and then retreats prior to the snap and the offense moves, DOF will be called only when it is the player(s) immediately opposite of the defensive action that is affected.

21 Any illegal movement that draws the defense offside shall be whistled dead. If an offensive lineman obviously breaks his stance or leaves early, the play shall be whistled dead. Any situation where a defensive player breaks the plane of the LOS or makes contact with the opponent prior to the snap shall be whistled dead.

22 Any slight movement or rocking by an offensive player that does not draw the defense offside is not to be called.

23 Formations during executions of a trick or unusual play have the highest degree of scrutiny and should be completely legal.

24 PASS INTERFERENCE

25 DPI - Actions that constitute DPI include but are not limited to: 1.Early contact by a defender who is not playing the ball is DPI provided other requirements for DPI have been met and the ball is deemed catchable. (Remember “illegal contact”) 2.Playing through the back of a receiver in an attempt to make a play on the ball. 3.Grabbing a receiver’s arm (s) in such a manner that restricts his opportunity to catch a pass.

26 DPI - Actions that constitute DPI include but are not limited to: 4. Extending an arm across the body (arm bar) of a receiver thus restricting his ability to catch a pass, regardless of the fact of whether or not the defender is playing the ball. 5.Cutting off or riding the receiver out of the path to the ball by making contact with him without playing the ball. 6.Hooking a receiver in an attempt to get to the ball in such a manner that it causes the receiver’s body to turn prior to the ball arriving.

27 Not DPI - Actions that do not constitute DPI include but are not limited to: 1.Incidental contact by a defender’s hand, arm or body when both players are competing for the ball or neither player is looking for the ball. If there is any question whether contact is incidental the ruling shall be no interference. 2.Inadvertent tangling of the feet when both players are playing the ball or neither player is playing the ball.

28 Not DPI - Actions that do not constitute DPI include but are not limited to: 3. Contact that would normally be considered pass interference, but the pass is deemed uncatchable. It is still possible to have other infractions such as holding. 4. Laying a hand on a receiver that does not restrict the receiver in an attempt to make a play on the ball.

29 OPI - Actions that constitute OPI include but are not limited to: 1. Initiating contact with a defender by shoving or pushing off thus creating separation in an attempt to catch a pass. 2. Driving through a defender who has established a position on the field. (i.e. under thrown ball)

30 Not OPI - Actions that do not constitute OPI include but are not limited to: 1. Incidental contact by a defender’s hand, arm or body when both players are competing for the ball or neither player is looking for the ball. 2. Inadvertent tangling of the feet when both players are playing the ball or neither player is playing the ball.

31 Not OPI - Actions that do not constitute OPI include but are not limited to: 3. Contact that would normally be considered pass interference, but the pass is deemed uncatchable. Pick play notwithstanding. 4. It is not OPI on a pick play if the defensive player is blocking the offensive player when the pick occurs.

32 PASS INTERFERENCE NOTES 1. If there is any question whether the player contact is incidental, the ruling should be no interference. 2. Defensive players have as much right to the path of the ball as eligible offensive players. 3. Pass interference for both teams ends when the pass is touched beyond the LOS. 4. Both players have a right to the ball and there must be “an obvious intent to gain an advantage” to rule pass interference.

33 P.I. - First and Ten Notes Screening is defined as having the hands and arms above the shoulder level interfering with the receiver’s view. Screening then turning to look for the ball is a foul. Turning to look for the ball, then putting hands up is not a foul.

34 A defensive player who perfectly times putting his hands up at the instance the ball arrives is making a good defensive play. When two players are both looking at the ball and playing the ball, contact while attempting to catch is not a foul. On a pass that is underthrown, if a player tries to come back and is prevented from doing so by a player who has established position, no foul.

35 PASSING SITUATIONS

36 If any pass is touched by any player prior to crossing the LOS, normal PI rules apply. Therefore if any pass is touched by any player after the LOS, normal PI rules do not apply.

37 For the passer to be ruled beyond the LOS when he releases the ball, his entire body and the ball must be beyond the LOS. Must be clearly obvious. Can be called by LOS officials.

38 If a receiver who is airborne controls the ball and is either contacted or falls to the ground on his own, in bounds, he must maintain control of the ball through his fall to be awarded a catch. (Must survive contact). If he goes out of bounds without contact rule incomplete.

39 Special focus shall be given on defensive action against the passer. The defender must be under control. (Must see the whole circumstance)

40 Once the pass has been released, there shall be no unnecessary contact on the passer, it is a foul. The passer does not have to be the QB.

41 If there is uncertainty as to whether a pass is complete or incomplete; rule as incomplete. (Including behind the LOS)

42 Any primary contact above the quarterback’s shoulders with anything i.e. hands, helmet, etc. is a foul. (should go for any player in the open field, but must be sure of the actions of the ball carrier)

43 To rule on intentional grounding, the QB must throw the ball away in an attempt to avoid a loss. (Anyone can call, but must be discussed)

44 Catch- If the ball touches the ground simultaneously in the receiver’s hands the pass is incomplete.

45 Special focus to all hits on defenseless receivers.

46 If there is uncertainty on interceptions near the goal line, rule that it occurred inside the EZ

47 To be ruled a catch the receiver must be able to demonstrate and maintain firm control of the football. If there is any uncertainty, rule incomplete.

48 KICKING

49 The kicker and holder are considered onside on a kick off.

50 If the kicker runs out from punt formation prior to punting the ball he loses his roughing protection unless he re-establishes. Unnecessary roughness may still be called if warranted, but not roughing the kicker.

51 Special focus should be given to the vulnerability of the punter when not in his normal kicking position (UR) Remember illegal interference on the punter prior to LOS. U.R. vs. Contact vs. Interference

52 END OF PLAY SITUATIONS

53 The ground cannot cause a fumble but it can cause an incompletion.

54 If contact occurs before a runner has a foot down OB, rule legal hit.

55 Runner continuing down sideline: If whistle has blown, runner has eased up, and there is more than incidental contact initiated by a defender, this is a foul. Be alert and be sure any action is not part of the initial play before calling a foul.

56 A runner crossing the goal line inside the pylon with the ball crossing outside the pylon is a TD. (Ball in possession and in EZ or ball must break the plane)

57 If there is ANY uncertainty in your mind that a ball carrier or any player steps out of bounds, rule still in bounds.

58 If a ball carrier is being held up or being driven back, forward progress has stopped and get on your whistle.

59 UNECESSARY ROUGHNESS / ROUGH PLAY / DQ’S

60 Unnecessary roughness is roughness that is unnecessary. Rough Play must be a deliberate action.

61 If action is deemed to be RP then the player must be disqualified. If there is any uncertainty, rule UR.

62 Deliberate contact with the helmet in “such a manner as to cause calculated injury” is always a foul whether by offense or defense and is RP.

63 Fouls on any player after the ball is dead, that are obviously late, must be called.

64 Spitting on an opponent requires disqualification. Classified as OC.

65 ANY racial slurs require DQ. However, one must be clear of the entire conversation. Reports need be made.

66 MISCELLANEOUS

67 Taking Of A Knee Officials will be notified by Team A of intention to take a knee. Officials notify Team B of the intent. Team B will be expected to notify officials. of intention to play or respect Team A’s intent. If Team B intends to play, Team A is advised.

68 Referee/Umpire awareness and proximity to LOS is imperative. H.L. And L.J. Will move in from sidelines. Other officials move closer. Referee will remind QB to go directly to a knee. One the referee sees a clear exchange of the ball between the Team A centre and QB, he will whistle the play dead. All officials will be attentive to the potential of U.R.

69 Player Losing Helmet If ball carrier - blow the play dead. Possession at PBD. If any player loses his helmet he must stop participating in the play. (L10 PBD) Ensure you see how helmet comes off Players who remove their helmet while on the field to confront an opponent or official – penalize as Objectionable Conduct.

70 If any part of the ball is touching the goal line, it is deemed to be in the end zone whether it is going in or coming out.

71 Side men don’t blow whistles on plays up the middle if they don’t see the ball.

72 Only the covering officials wind the clock on a kick off

73 Three step side line warning. First - Sideman warns coach. Second - Sideman goes to Referee and Referee warns coach. Third- Throw flag and call OC. (do not have rabbit ears)

74 The ball can be placed on a yard line to begin the next possession. At all other times, the ball is placed where it is. (Exception: If the change of possession occurs on a 4 th down running or passing play, the ball will be left at the dead ball spot to begin the next series.)

75 WRAP UP Study and know the rule book and mechanics. Be professional, focused and give it your best effort on field. Remember that the game you are officiating could be that one player’s Grey Cup. Be confident and proud of what you do each and every game, BUT check the ego!

76 See the foul, find the ball, make the call! If you THINK it is a foul, IT IS NOT. If you THINK it’s a UR, IT IS. Don’t blow your whistle if you do not see the ball! Above all, work together as the third team out there, communicate, get the job done, but have fun!


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