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Occupation Specific Language Training for Aboriginal People and Mining in Northern Ontario Presented by Oshki-Pimache-O-Win EDUCATION & TRAINING INSTITUTE.

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Presentation on theme: "Occupation Specific Language Training for Aboriginal People and Mining in Northern Ontario Presented by Oshki-Pimache-O-Win EDUCATION & TRAINING INSTITUTE."— Presentation transcript:

1 Occupation Specific Language Training for Aboriginal People and Mining in Northern Ontario Presented by Oshki-Pimache-O-Win EDUCATION & TRAINING INSTITUTE APRIL 2011 Executive Presentation

2 Overview About Oshki-Pimache-O-Win Aboriginal Peoples & Mining in Northern Ontario Skills Gap in First Nations Participation OSLT at Ontario Colleges OSLT-APAM at OSHKI Key Benefits Next Steps

3 ABOUT OSHKI-PIMACHE-O-WIN OSLT-APAM at OSHKI-PIMACHE-O-WIN

4 Oshki-Pimache-O-Win Education & Training Institute Independent Aboriginal post secondary institution Established in 1996 by the Nishnawbe Aski Nation Chiefs-in-Assembly Incorporated in 2001 Oshki-Pimache-O-Win means “A New Beginning” in the Oji-Cree language

5 Our Mission... To be the leader in providing excellence in post secondary education by meeting the educational and cultural needs of the members and communities of Nishnawbe Aski Nation through a holistic approach to lifelong learning.

6 Nishnawbe Aski Nation Covers 2/3 of Ontario 49 First Nations 45,000 people 2/3 live on-reserve 3 Aboriginal languages: o Ojibway o Oji-Cree o Cree

7 OSHKI Fast Facts Reputation Successful partnerships with communities, government and higher education Location Thunder Bay, Ontario Campus Downtown office complex, modern facilities, outgrowing due to rising enrolments Students Over 100 students enrolled for 2010/2011 Faculty Over 20 instructors Programs of Study Health, Social Services, Business, and Academic Upgrading

8 ABORIGINAL PEOPLES & MINING IN NORTHERN ONTARIO OSLT-APAM at OSHKI-PIMACHE-O-WIN

9 Exploration Boom in Ontario Exploration spending: o $120 million in 2002 o $800 million in 2008 Mining claims: o 114,000 claims in 2007 o 363,000 claims in 2008 o More than 32,000 claims in Ontario’s Ring of Fire

10 Active Mines in Northern Ontario Musselwhite Mine (Goldcorp) Musselwhite Mine (Goldcorp) Red Lake Mine (Goldcorp) Red Lake Mine (Goldcorp) Victor Mine (De Beers) Victor Mine (De Beers) Lac des Lles (North American Palladium) Lac des Lles (North American Palladium) David Bell/Williams Mine (Barrick Gold) David Bell/Williams Mine (Barrick Gold) Young-Davidson Mine (Northgate Minerals) Young-Davidson Mine (Northgate Minerals) Pamour Mine (Porcupine/Goldcorp) Pamour Mine (Porcupine/Goldcorp)

11 “Ring of Fire” in the Heart of Nishnawbe Aski Nation

12 Over 30 Exploration Companies

13 Aboriginal Exploration and Mining Agreements Victor Mine o De Beers Canada, Attawapiskat First Nation, et al. Young-Davidson Mine o Northgate Minerals, Matachewan First Nation McFaulds Lake Project o Noront Resources, Webequie First Nation, et al. Timmins West Project o Lake Shore Gold, Flying Post First Nation, et al. Detour Lake Project o Detour Gold, Wahgoshig First Nation Musselwhite Mine o Goldcorp, North Caribou Lake First Nation, et al.

14 Mining Industry

15 Aboriginal Ontario 133 First Nations 242,490 Aboriginal people 41% live in the north Half are under the age of 25 years 13 Aboriginal languages

16 Aboriginal Population in Ontario and Selected Regions 86,605 Aboriginal peoples in Northern Ontario 86,605 Aboriginal peoples in Northern Ontario

17 Aboriginal Languages in Ontario and Selected Regions NAN East Cree and Ojibway NAN West Oji-Cree and Ojibway

18 Aboriginal Languages in Northern Ontario and Selected Districts NAN WESTNAN EAST

19 First Nations People On-Reserve Over Half Speak an Aboriginal Language

20 Aboriginal Language Dialects in Ontario

21 First Nation Community

22 SKILLS GAP IN FIRST NATIONS PARTICIPATION OSLT-APAM at OSHKI-PIMACHE-O-WIN

23 Problem and Scope There are several areas in which language becomes intertwined with the Northern Ontario mining sector, and systemic language barriers are faced by a growing number of First Nations peoples that prevent and impede community participation in exploration and mining projects.

24 Consultation and Negotiation “One of the difficulties we found was that there aren’t a lot of technical words and terms in the Cree language for many of the things you do in mining.” - Jonathan Fowler, Vice President Aboriginal Affairs, De Beers Canada

25 Literacy and Essential Skills “Community members are having a challenge in qualifying for skilled trades training programs because some are finding it difficult to pass the TOWES exam.” - Virginia Sutherland, IBA Coordinator De Beers Canada, Victor Mine

26 Skilled Trades Training Occupational language and terminology of the trades was a significant language barrier for Aboriginal participants challenged with participating in skilled trades training and writing trade exams. – Research study (Centre for Aboriginal Apprenticeship Research, Sioux Lookout Area Aboriginal Management Board, March 2010) Occupational language and terminology of the trades was a significant language barrier for Aboriginal participants challenged with participating in skilled trades training and writing trade exams. – Research study (Centre for Aboriginal Apprenticeship Research, Sioux Lookout Area Aboriginal Management Board, March 2010)

27 Work Environment At De Beers, the official language of work is English. One challenge De Beers faces in working with a Northern population is that English is not a first language for many of the local residents. Consequently, many new hires from the regions surrounding the mines face language barriers at work. - Victor Mine case study (Conference Board of Canada, May 2010)

28 Language Barriers Natural Language Natural Language – English literacy, broken English, English as a second language Occupational Language Occupational Language – Mining literacy, socio-cultural and technical language and vocabulary of the mining industry, especially as it applies to skilled occupations Legal Language Legal Language – Legalese, convoluted technical talk of the legal sector with respect to mining

29 Potential Impacts Community opposition and confrontation Lost and delayed opportunities Increase in project costs Strained relationships Cancelled project

30 Need to Bridge Communication Gap Between Industry and Community

31 Need to Bridge Skills Gap Between Occupation and Worker

32 OCCUPATION SPECIFIC LANGUAGE TRAINING AT ONTARIO COLLEGES OSLT-APAM at OSHKI-PIMACHE-O-WIN

33 “OSLT provides communication and socio-cultural workplace training to newcomers to help them succeed within their chosen careers” - Colleges Ontario

34 OSLT at a Glance Funded by Citizenship and Immigration Canada Offered by 13 colleges across Ontario 180 hours of instruction Courses available on a part-time or full-time basis Courses geared towards newcomers Courses focused on health, business, skilled trades, and technology sectors and occupations

35 Sector-based Language Training with a Focus on Occupations Each course curriculum includes communication training relevant to the sector, as well as instruction tailored to the specific occupational communication needs of participants

36 In-depth Curriculum Designed by Content and Language Experts Language and occupational content experts have designed the courses using a common framework so that all courses address sector, occupation and socio-cultural communication skills in a consistent way The courses are delivered by qualified college language instructors who have received orientation in this language curriculum

37 Providing an Understanding of Workplace Culture Participants will develop a strong understanding of the socio-linguistic dimensions of their occupation and its sector, and learn how to communicate effectively within their workplace culture These courses better position newcomers for career success

38 Serving Newcomers and Supporting Ontario’s Economy OSLT courses meet both the career communication needs of newcomers and the skilled labour needs of the province Practical, intensive and career-driven language training will help newcomers find and maintain work commensurate with their skills and experience in their specific occupation, and better integrate into the provincial workforce

39 OSLT Courses at Ontario Colleges

40 OCCUPATION SPECIFIC LANGUAGE TRAINING AT OSHKI OSLT-APAM at OSHKI-PIMACHE-O-WIN

41 OSLT-APAM at a Glance OSLT-APAM fills a skills gap for First Nations peoples whose first language is not English OSLT-APAM addresses a skills shortage for mining employers OSLT-APAM positions First Nations peoples for employment and training in their territory

42 Vision Our vision of the OSLT-APAM program is to ensure that First Nations peoples develop to their fullest potential. Becoming fully self-reliant to be able to access and participate in employment and economic opportunities that will become available in the emerging Ring of Fire. Within this long-term vision, governments recognize the unique value of OSLT and are committed to supporting it across the continuum of human resources and skills development for First Nations peoples.

43 Goal #1 To increase the knowledge and understanding of First Nations communities and mining companies on how OSLT-APAM can contribute to strengthening the Northern Ontario mining sector for economic growth and job creation

44 Goal #2 To increase access to Occupation Specific Language Training opportunities for First Nations peoples to help position them for employment and training opportunities that will become available in their territory

45 Goal #3 To create new links and partnerships between OSHKI and government, industry and other stakeholders to ensure a more concerted effort in improving employment and training outcomes for First Nations peoples through occupation specific language training

46 Project TimelineYear 1Year 2Year 3 Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q4 Phase I – Engagement 1.1 Recruit Project Team 1.2 Establish Project Website 1.3 Project Launch Event 1.4 Stakeholder Engagement 1.5 Research and Scoping 1.6 Prepare Framework Overview Phase II – Development 2.1 Orientation and Workshops 2.2 Working Group Collaboration 2.3 External Consultation 2.4 Prepare Framework Drafts 2.5 Develop Tools and Methods 2.6 Prepare Project Interim Report Phase III – Validation 3.1 Implementation 3.2 Evaluation and Revision 3.3 Finalize Framework Phase IV – Dissemination 4.1 Disseminations 4.2 Prepare Project Final Report Three Year Work Plan

47 Supported by NAN Chiefs Presented at XXVIII Keewaywin Conference, Chapleau Cree First Nation Passed Resolution 09/66: Support for Oshki- Pimache-O-Win for Occupation Specific Language Training for First Nations

48 Indigenous Best Practices Australian Government has been supporting workplace literacy and language training for their Indigenous population for 20 years Best practices to draw from the Maori people Similar exploration and mining context

49 KEY BENEFITS OSLT-APAM at OSHKI-PIMACHE-O-WIN

50 Promotes Shared Values Respect, trust, openness, honesty Build early relationships Build positive long term relationships Build healthy and vibrant communities Build productive, safe work environments Show me the money! Respect, trust, openness, honesty Build early relationships Build positive long term relationships Build healthy and vibrant communities Build productive, safe work environments Show me the money!

51 Increases English Language Proficiency OSLT-APAM will increase participants English language proficiency up to Canadian Language Benchmark 7 OSLT-APAM will increase participants mining literacy and mining essential skills

52 Promotes Community Participation OSLT-APAM will foster community confidence and morale OSLT-APAM will help community members develop a willingness and readiness to take first steps toward participation

53 Creates a Level Playing Field OSLT-APAM will contribute towards ensuring a level playing field in community consultations and negotiations

54 Promotes Team Work and Productivity OSLT-APAM will encourage communication, consultation, and team work OSLT-APAM will build harmonious working relationships

55 Promotes Occupational Health and Safety OSLT-APAM will promote a safe work environment OSLT-APAM will promote “cultural safety” which is correlated to First Nations occupational health and safety - National Aboriginal Health Organization, 2006

56 NEXT STEPS OSLT-APAM at OSHKI-PIMACHE-O-WIN

57 Build Partnerships Key Partners Key Partners – First Nations Communities – Exploration and Mining Companies – Ontario Colleges / OSLT – Local Employment and Training Agencies – Aboriginal Language Professionals

58 Commit Resources Steering Committee Steering Committee – Representatives from partners & stakeholders Multidisciplinary Working Groups Multidisciplinary Working Groups – OSLT-APAM framework and toolkit development – OSLT-APAM curriculum development – OSLT-APAM program development Project Tools Project Tools – Occupational standards and practices – Achievement standards

59 Secure Funding Federal Federal – FedNor – Community Economic Development – INAC – Strategic Partnership Initiative – HRSDC – Skills and Partnership Fund Provincial Provincial – MTCU – Northern Training Partnership Fund – MCI – Ontario Bridge Training Fund – MNDM – Northern Ontario Heritage Fund

60 Contact Details Gordon Kakegamic, OSLT-APAM Project Lead Oshki-Pimache-O-Win Education & Training Institute 106 Centennial Square, 3 rd Floor Thunder Bay, Ontario P7C 4H2 Phone: (807) Fax: (807) Web:


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