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Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–1 Introduction to Management Bob Fast Chapter 1 Week 1a (Sept 13) IM 471.11 Fall.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–1 Introduction to Management Bob Fast Chapter 1 Week 1a (Sept 13) IM 471.11 Fall."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–1 Introduction to Management Bob Fast Chapter 1 Week 1a (Sept 13) IM Fall 2011

2 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–2 To Start (1 st half of class)  Introductions  Overview of course  Relationship to other courses  Relationship to our lives

3 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–3 Introductions! Who are you, who am I? - Name, home town, year at Providence Why are you here? - what program are you in? - why have you elected this program? What is your managerial or leadership experience? - business, retail, sports, school, church, etc

4 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–4 Overview of course Key questions we’re tackling:  What is an organization?  Do I want to work in one?  What is a manager?  Do I want to be one?  What is the relevance to faith & ministry?

5 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–5 Housekeeping Start time of class is 6:30; 9:15  I will begin each class at 6:30  Some classes will begin with test We have a break mid-way (approx 7:45 – 8:00) Name cards – pls bring your name card each week Bring Textbook to class each week We will review the syllabus in the 2nd half of the class

6 PowerPoint Presentation by Clive Cook and Dale Dilamarter Gary Dessler Frederick A. Starke Gary Dessler Frederick A. Starke Principles and Practices for Tomorrow’s Leaders Second Canadian Edition Principles and Practices for Tomorrow’s Leaders Second Canadian Edition Management Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. Managing in the Twenty-First Century 1 C H A P T E R Part One: Introduction to Managing

7 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–7 Chapter Objectives After studying this chapter and the case exercises at the end, you should be able to: 1.List the specific management tasks facing a manager. 2.Identify the manager. 3.Answer the question, “Do I have what it takes to be a manager?” 4.Understand the skills that a manager must possess.

8 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–8 Chapter Objectives (continued) 5.Explain the characteristics of the external environment that influence managers. 6.Explain how the characteristics of modern organizations influence managers.

9 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–9 Organization Defined Organization  A group of people with formally assigned roles who work together to achieve the stated goals of the group.  Characteristics:  Common purpose/goals  Organizational structure

10 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–10 Organization Defined Organization  A group of people with formally assigned roles who work together to achieve the stated goals of the group.  Characteristics:  Common purpose/goals  Organizational structure

11 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–11 Management Defined Manager  A person who plans, organizes, leads, and controls the work of others so that the organization achieves its goals.  Is responsible for contribution.  Gets things done through the efforts of other people.  Is skilled at the management process. Management Process  Refers to the manager’s four basic functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.

12 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–12 You Too Are a Manager Management skills are also useful for “non- managers”.  In the workplace  Leisure activities

13 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–13 Efficiency and Effectiveness Efficiency means achieving the greatest possible output with a given amount of input. Effectiveness means to achieve goals that have been set. To achieve managerial effectiveness, focus on  The tasks that employees do  The satisfaction of employees as they do the tasks

14 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–14 What Else Do Managers Do? Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles Figurehead Leader Liaison Spokesperson Negotiator

15 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–15 The Manager as Innovator The Entrepreneurial Process  Getting employees to think of themselves as entrepreneurs. The Competence-Building Process  Working hard to create an environment that lets employees really take charge. The Renewal Process  Guarding against complacency by encouraging employees to question why they do things as they do—and if they might do them differently.

16 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–16 Types of Managers FIGURE 1–1

17 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–17 Do You Have the Traits to Be a Manager? Personality and Interests  Social Orientation  Attracted to working with others in a helpful or facilitative way; comfortable dealing with people.  Enterprising Orientation  Enjoy working with people in a supervisory or persuasive way in order to achieve some goal.

18 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–18 Do You Have the Traits to Be a Manager? (cont’d) Competencies  Managerial Competence  The motivation and skills required to gain a management position, including intellectual (analytical), emotional, and interpersonal skills.  Career Anchor  Is an occupational self-concept or value that directs an individual’s career choices. Managers often have had a strong motivation to earn the position of manager.

19 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–19 The Managerial Skills Technical Skills  The need to know how to plan, organize, lead, and control. Interpersonal Skills  An understanding of human behavior and group processes, and the feelings, attitudes, and motives of others, and ability to communicate clearly and persuasively. Conceptual Skills  Good judgment, creativity, and the ability to see the “big picture” when confronted with information.

20 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–20 What is a Manager? …. A blend of: a force for change – lead  entrepreneurial approach  competence-building process  renewal a force for stability - manage  holding to standards  holding to goals  valuing

21 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–21 Today’s Management Environment Globalization  The tendency of firms to extend their sales, ownership, and/or manufacturing to new markets abroad. Technological Innovation  Information technology advances have revolutionized the workplace Deregulation and Privatization  Less government involvement in business

22 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–22 Today’s Management Environment Changing Political Systems  Central planning is being replaced by capitalism A Diverse Workforce  Increasing numbers of women and minority-groups participating  Becoming older Category Killers  Large chain stores squeeze out weaker retail firms and negotiate lower cost of goods sold

23 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–23 Basic Management Features Today Smaller, More Entrepreneurial Organizational Units Team-Based and Boundaryless Organizations Empowered Decision- Making Flatter Organizational Structures Knowledge-Based Management New Bases of Management Power An Emphasis on Vision Strong Leadership Technology and E- based Management

24 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–24 Source: Harvard Business Review, March–April 1998, p. 82. Copyright © 1998 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. All rights reserved. FIGURE 1–3 The Evolution of a Faster Business Model

25 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–25 The Foundations of Modern Management The Classical Approach to Management  Frederick W. Taylor and Scientific Management 1.The “one best way” 2.Scientific selection of personnel 3.Financial incentives 4.Functional foremanship

26 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–26 The Foundations of Modern Management (cont’d) The Classical Approach to Management (cont’d)  Frank and Lillian Gilbreth and Motion Study  Analyzed physical motion and work processes to improve worker efficiency.  Henri Fayol and the Principles of Management  Defined the functions of management  Published “General and Industrial Management”  Advocated “chain of command”

27 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–27 The Foundations of Modern Management (cont’d) The Classical Approach to Management (cont’d)  Max Weber and the Bureaucracy  A well-defined hierarchy of authority  A clear division of work  A system of rules covering the rights and duties of position incumbents  A system of procedures for dealing with the work situation  Impersonality of interpersonal relationships  Selection for employment, and promotion based on technical competence

28 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–28 The Foundations of Modern Management (cont’d) The Behavioural School of Management  The Hawthorne Studies  Researchers found that it was the social situations of the workers, not just the working conditions, that influenced behavior at work.  The Human Relations Movement  Emphasized that workers were not just “givens” in the system. Workers have needs and desires that organizations have to accommodate.

29 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–29 The Foundations of Modern Management (cont’d) The Behavioural School of Management (cont’d)  Douglas McGregor: Theory X  Most people dislike work and responsibility and prefer to be directed.  They are motivated not by the desire to do a good job, but simply by financial incentives.  Most people must be closely supervised, controlled, and coerced into achieving organizational objectives.

30 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–30 The Foundations of Modern Management (cont’d) The Behavioural School of Management (cont’d)  Douglas McGregor: Theory Y  People wanted to work hard.  People could enjoy work.  People could exercise substantial self-control.  Managers could trust employees if managers treated them right.

31 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–31 The Foundations of Modern Management (cont’d) The Behavioural School of Management (cont’d)  Rensis Likert and the Employee-Centered Organization  Less effective organizations have a “job-centered” focus: specialized jobs, emphasis on efficiency, and close supervision of workers.  Effective “employee-centered” organizations build effective work groups with high performance goals.”  Participation is an important approach employed by high-producing managers.

32 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–32 Bridging the Eras Chester Barnard’s “Zone of Indifference”  A range of orders that a worker will willingly accept without consciously questioning their legitimacy.  Managers have to provide sufficient inducements (and not just financial ones) to make each employee’s zone of indifference wider. Herbert Simon and Gaining Compliance  Use the classicists’ command and control approach.  Foster employee self-control by providing better training, encouraging participative leadership, and developing commitment and loyalty.

33 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–33 The Quantitative School The Management Science Approach  Operations Research/ Management Science  Seeks optimal solutions to management problems through research and the use of scientific analysis and tools.  The Systems Approach  The view that an organization exists as a set of interrelated subsystems that all contribute internally to the organization’s purpose and success while interacting with the organization’s external environment.

34 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–34 The Contingency Approach Contingency View of Management.  The organization and how its managers should manage it are contingent on the company’s environment and on technology.

35 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–35 To Start overview of course relationship to other courses relationship to our lives

36 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–36 Business Program IB IM SM OB E1E2 FA MA HR BC CF FM E CL EM EC/CT SA P/S CU BG MS

37 37 What is a Christian Manager? (How does the study of management relate to our lives)

38 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–38 What is a Christian Manager? Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world....Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the measure of faith God has given you....We have different gifts, according to the grace given us…if it [the gift] is leadership, let him govern diligently… Romans 12

39 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–39 What is a Christian Manager? Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world....Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the measure of faith God has given you....We have different gifts, according to the grace given us…if it [the gift] is leadership, let him govern diligently… Romans 12

40 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–40 What’s A Christian Manager?   he that …leaders, govern diligently… takes the lead  withdiligence pro-is'-tay-mee to set or place before to set over to be over, to superintend, preside over to be a protector or guardian to give aid to profess honest occupations proistemi spoude haste, with haste earnestness, diligence earnestness in accomplishing, promoting, or striving after anything to give all diligence, interest one's self most earnestly spoo-day‘ [should do it]

41 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–41 What is a Christian Manager? You haven’t been made a manager to exercise power. You’re here to protect and guard, to care for, give attention to. How? Not casually, not plodding along. With an eagerness. With your full attention and abilities. …leaders, govern diligently…

42 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–42 Summary  Management Process or Framework  Planning  Organizing  Leading  Controlling

43 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–43 Summary  Core Management Skills  technical  interpersonal  conceptual  change +

44 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–44 Summary Organization:  Group of people  Assigned roles  Working together collectively  Achieve stated goals  With oversight and led by a Manager!

45 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–45 Questions???

46 Copyright © 2004 Pearson Education Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. 1–46 Break Time….


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