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All Students Cannot Learn: Bridging the Social, Emotional, and Cultural Gaps for Student Success Dr. Kellie Sanders & Dr. Kristine Servais To care for.

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Presentation on theme: "All Students Cannot Learn: Bridging the Social, Emotional, and Cultural Gaps for Student Success Dr. Kellie Sanders & Dr. Kristine Servais To care for."— Presentation transcript:

1 All Students Cannot Learn: Bridging the Social, Emotional, and Cultural Gaps for Student Success Dr. Kellie Sanders & Dr. Kristine Servais To care for anyone else enough to make their problems one's own, is ever the beginning of one's real ethical development. Felix Adler Wake Up Everybody

2 Who are we? Teachers Counselors Specialists Administrators Leaders Who are your facilitators?

3 Changing our perspectives is like a kaleidoscope because… with a new vision we can gain new perspectives. what we look for, is what we see. reflection enlightens our vision. patterns can be changed! change doesnt occur without action. new perspectives enable us to take action for change.

4 The critical question for us today: Can all students learn? Goals for today Participants will enhance their knowledge and awareness of diversity and equity in order to improve student success. Participants will gain an understanding of cultural proficiency, poverty, and social emotional learning that can be applied to the classroom setting. Participants will engage in actions and strategies that they can replicate in their own environment. What we look for is what we see; Recognize the gifts among us.

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6 Opening thought: Consider the Pygmalion Effect The Pygmalion effect, or Rosenthal effect, refers to the phenomenon in which the greater the expectation placed upon people, often children or students and employees, the better they perform. Jane Elliots PBS A Class Divided (Brown Eyes-Blue Eyes Exercise) When teachers expect students to do well and show intellectual growth, they do; when teachers do not have such expectations, performance and growth are not so encouraged and may in fact be discouraged in a variety of ways." (James Rhem)

7 What do we know about the impact of poverty on students? Poverty has been analyzed and studied for years. The results are in: poverty impacts the brain. But did you know how it does the damage? Here are six of the many ways: Nutritional deficits. A myriad of food deficiencies lead to chronic behavioral, emotional and cognitive problems. Emotional Support. Unfortunately, these students need support the most and often get it the least. Stress/Distress. There are far more daily stressors for those in poverty and they have fewer resources to deal with them. Health Issues. A constant challenge for the poor, staying healthy, is but a dream for most. But we know health affects everything. Cognitive Stimulation. Students of poverty get less frequent and lower levels of quality intellectual fueling. Safety Issues. These students are chronically unsafe, leading to changes in their brain. Teaching With Poverty in Mind (Eric Jensen)

8 The Power of Assets The Search Institute in Minneapolis conducted a research study of 100,000 students from grade in approximately 213 communities across the United States. The institute identified 40 internal and external assets that are important to young people as they face the many challenges they experience outside of school. Most people can draw on close to 20 assets as the grow up…the more assets they have, the better their chances of avoiding destructive behaviors. The Superintendents Fieldbook (2005), Cambron-McCabe, Cunningham, Harvey, and Koff

9 Two Types of Assets External Developmental Assets Support: Family, positive family communication, other adult relationships, caring neighborhood, caring school climate, parent involvement in school Empowerment: Community values youth, youth as resources, service to others, safety Boundaries/Expectations: Family rules and consequences, school rules and consequences, neighborhood responsibility, adult role models, positive peer influence, high expectations Constructive use of time: Creative activities, youth programs, religious community, time at home Internal Developmental Assets Commitment to learning: Achievement motivation, school engagement, homework (1hr. Each day), bonding to school, reading for pleasure Positive Values: Caring for others, equality and social justice, integrity (stands up for beliefs), honesty, responsibility, restraint Social Competencies: Planning and decision making, interpersonal competence, cultural competence, resistance skills, peaceful conflict resolution Positive Identity: Person power, self- esteem, sense of purpose, positive view of personal future. The Superintendents Fieldbook (2005), Cambron-McCabe, Cunningham, Harvey, and Koff

10 The Power of Assets BehaviorsYouth with 0-10 Assets Youth with Assets Youth with Assets Youth with Assets - Alcohol use53%30%11%3% - Illicit drug use42%19%6%1% - Sexual activity33%21%10%3% - Violence61%35%16%6% + Succeed in school 7%19%35%53% + Value diversity34%53%69%87% + Maintain good health 25%46%69%88% + Delay gratification 27%42%56%72% The Superintendents Fieldbook (2005), Cambron-McCabe, Cunningham, Harvey, and Koff

11 Insider-Outside Activity

12 How did it feel as an insider? Outsider? Insiders Outsiders

13 Who are YOUR insiders and outsiders? InsidersOutsiders How do we ensure that all those who perceive themselves to be outsiders can change their perspective?

14 Reflections on the Insider-Outside Activity What are the social and emotional needs of students in poverty? How could the Social- Emotional standards be a tool for teachers?

15 Social Emotional Learning (SEL) SEL is a process for helping children and even adults develop the fundamental skills for life effectiveness. SEL teaches the skills we all need to handle ourselves, our relationships, and our work, effectively and ethically. Standards: 1. Self-awareness and Self-management 2. Social awareness and Relationship skills 3. Responsible behavior and decision-making

16 Equity and SEL Carousel Activity (Pair-Share Conversation) A. In what ways will we use the social emotional standards in our classrooms to help our students feel a part of the school community? B. What actions have you or will you take to help faculty better understand and be sensitive to equity and social emotional learning? C. In what ways does your staff demonstrate an inclusive learning environment for parents and all stakeholders? D. What actions will you take to improve educational equity?

17 1. Each team will select a poster question and identify as many responses as possible. 2. Teams will record their responses on each poster using a designated (colored) marker. 3. Each team will rotate to the remaining posters and attempt to add responses not already identified with other posted questions. 4. Each team will report back the responses they contributed to their original posted question. 5. Discuss the overall results of the activity. In what ways could this activity be used with your faculty? Sample Carousel Activity

18 Identify parent needs during parent- teacher conferences Build and sustain relationships with families Way Finding in our Buildings Ease of communication for our bilingual parents (discuss learning phrases for PTO meeting and having an interpreter). Other Suggestions How can SEL be a tool with parents?

19 Cultural Proficiency Continuum Cultural Destructiv eness Cultural In- capacity Cultural Blindness Cultural Precompe tence Cultural Com- petence Cultural Pro- ficiency

20 Cultural Proficiency Continuum Cultural Destructiveness: leading in a way that you seek to eliminate others cultures in all aspects of the school. Cultural Incapacity: leading in a way that you trivialize other cultures and seek to make the culture of others appear to be wrong. Cultural Blindness: leading where you dont see or acknowledge the culture of others and you choose to ignore the discrepant experiences of cultures within your school. Cultural Proficient Leadership, Terrell & Lindsey, p. 18

21 Cultural Proficiency Continuum Cultural Pre-competence: Leading with an increasing awareness of what you and the school dont know about working in diverse settings. Cultural Competence: Leading with your personal values and behaviors and the schools policies and practices being aligned in a manner that is inclusive with cultures that are new or different from you and the school. Cultural Proficiency: Leading as an advocate for life-long learning with the purpose of being increasingly effective in serving the educational needs of cultural groups. Cultural Proficient Leadership, Terrell & Lindsey, p. 18

22 Barriers to Cultural Proficiency Resistance to Change Systems of Oppression A Sense of Privilege and Entitlement ***************************** Barriers are manifested in these type of statements: It is not me that needs to change. I have been a successful teacher for years. These parents need to get a clue. P. 72 Culturally Proficient Learning Communities

23 Provide examples for where your school or department is on this continuum? Hand up-Pair up. Discuss.

24 Forced Choice Activity Conduct Activity. Pause. Rewind. Reflect on your Choices. Discuss how this activity can be used with your faculty.

25 The Essential Elements for Culturally Proficient Practices Assess cultural knowledge: What do we need to do in order to be effective in cross-cultural situations? Valuing Diversity: Create informal and formal decision- making groups that are inclusive of everyones viewpoints and experiences. Managing the Differences: Model problem solving and conflict resolution strategies. Adapting to Diversity: Demonstrate your ability to use others cultural experiences in all school settings. Institutionalizing Cultural Knowledge: Make learning about cultural groups and experiences an integral part of the professional development within your school setting. Cultural Proficient Leadership (Terrell & Lindsey), p. 19

26 Cultural Proficiency Practices Pair share What are your schools cultural proficiencies? What areas would you like to improve?

27 Diversity Awareness Activities Wake Up Everybody Video and Discussion Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes Video and Discussion Forced Choice Activity On The Line Activity Freedom Writers Video Clip of On-The-Line Carousel Activity on Cultural Diversity Faculty Book Talk

28 What commitment will you make (in the next 48 hours) to further diversity, equity, or social emotional learning in your schools? View The Class Divided Video as a faculty Conduct a book study with your team. Get parents involved in planning and implementing SEL in your school. Conduct some of the activities introduced during this session. Utilize staff meetings/learning sessions to provide for conversations and engaged learning experiences to improve cultural proficiency. Discuss and apply the cultural proficient practices

29 Resources List (Book Talk) Educational Leadership: Confronting the Racism of Low Expectations, Lindsey, D., Jungwirth, L., Pahl, J., Lindsey, R. (2009). Culturally Proficient Learning Communities Lyman, L. and Villani, C. (2004). Best leadership practices for high poverty schools. Jensen, Eric (2011). Teaching with Poverty in Mind Singleton, G. and Linton, C. (2006). Courageous Conversations About Race. Social and Emotional Standards: Terrell, R and Lindsey, R. ( 2009). Culturally Proficient Leadership: The Personal Journey Begins Within.

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31 How will you and your staff take action to improve educational equity? Jot down some promises that you will make to yourself to implement more equitable educational practices.

32 Did we Accomplished Our Goals for Today? Participants will enhance their knowledge and awareness of diversity and equity in order to improve student success. Participants will gain an understanding of cultural proficiency, poverty, and social emotional learning that can be applied to the classroom setting. Participants will engage in actions and strategies that they can replicate in their own environment. What is an idea or activity you will put into action after today?

33 Contact Information Dr. Kristine Servais, Dr. Kellie Sanders, Check it out: The Courage to Lead, available The Courage to Grow, Feb. 2012


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