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The Evaluation of the Firesetting Intervention Programme for Mentally Disordered Offenders (FIP-MO) Nichola Tyler, Theresa A. Gannon, & Lona Lockerbie.

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Presentation on theme: "The Evaluation of the Firesetting Intervention Programme for Mentally Disordered Offenders (FIP-MO) Nichola Tyler, Theresa A. Gannon, & Lona Lockerbie."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Evaluation of the Firesetting Intervention Programme for Mentally Disordered Offenders (FIP-MO) Nichola Tyler, Theresa A. Gannon, & Lona Lockerbie

2 High prevalence rate of firesetting in mentally disordered offenders Overview Lack of existing treatment programmes Promising initial results Future directions

3 High prevalence rates amongst psychiatric populations (Coid et al., 2001; Geller & Bertsch, 1985) Firesetting in Mentally Disordered Offenders Mental illness is consistently reported in the literature as a risk factor for repeat firesetting (Tyler & Gannon, 2012) Firesetting = Acts of setting fire that may or may not have been legally recorded as arson, or legally recorded at all

4 No standardised treatment available (either in prison or hospitals; Palmer, Caulfield, & Hollin, 2007) Some treatment in psychiatric settings (e.g., Rampton, Broadmoor, Ashworth) Very little treatment or evaluation is published What Treatment Programmes Exist for Firesetters?

5 Lack of knowledge regarding risk factors (Palmer, Hollin, Hatcher, & Ayres, 2010) We assume needs are met by general programmes (e.g., social skills, problem solving) Untreated firesetters re-offend at rate of 16% (Rice & Harris, 1996) Why Such Little Work With Firesetters Generally? Lack of understanding of the role mental health plays in the offence process for firesetting (Hollin, 2012)

6 Why Do We Need to Treat Firesetters? Firesetters found to request treatment to focus more directly on their firesetting behaviour (Haines et al., 2006) Recidivism rates for sexual offending similar (16.8%) Research suggests mental health plays an important role in the offence process for firesetters (Tyler et al., 2013) Estimated that deliberate firesetting costs the UK economy £53.8 million per week (Arson prevention Forum, 2013)

7 Developed at the Trevor Gibbens Unit The Firesetting Intervention Programme for Mentally Disordered Offenders (FIP-MO) Positive patient feedback Wanted to develop further and roll programme out multi-site to evaluate it’s effectiveness

8 Cognitive behavioural with psychotherapeutic elements The Firesetting Intervention Programme for Mentally Disordered Offenders (FIP-MO) Dual focus: Increase patients’ understanding of the factors associated with their firesetting Increase patients’ skills to manage risk/lead a rewarding life

9 28 week programme (approx treatment hours FIP-MO Structure Weekly group sessions (approx 2 hours in length) Weekly individual sessions (approx 1 hour in length) Patients do not need to: Admit their firesetting or, Have actually set a fire (threats to set a fire, interest in explosives can be included

10 The FIP-MO addresses 4 key areas: Treatment Targets Fire Interest/Identification Offence Supportive Attitudes Communication/Relationships Self Management/Coping

11 Treatment Targets Offence Supportive Attitudes (Mills & Kroner, 1999) Attitudes that support violence Attitudes that support antisocial behaviour Sense of entitlement in relation to offending Criminal associates

12 Treatment Targets Self Management/Coping Anger (Spielberger, 1999) Locus of control (Nowicki, 1976)

13 Treatment Targets Communication/Relationships Self esteem (Battle, 1992) Emotional loneliness (Russell, 1996) Assertiveness (Jenerette & Dixon, 2010)

14 Treatment Targets Fire Interest/Identification (Ó Ciardha et al., 2013) Every day fire interest – “Having a box of matches in your pocket” Serious fire interest – “Watching a person with his clothes on fire” Fire Safety Awareness – “I know a lot about how to prevent fires” Identification with fire – “Fire is part of my personality” Normalisation of fire – “Most people have set a few small fires just for fun”

15 Research being conducted across 22 sites (NHS and Non- NHS in the UK). Multi-Site Research Project Ardenleigh Guild Lodge Reaside Centre Independent Sector Alpha Hospital Bury St Andrews Healthcare Alpha Hospital Sheffield Waterloo Manor (Inmind) The Dene (PiC) Cygnet Hospital Derby Cygnet Hospital Stevenage NHS Newton Lodge Arnold Lodge Trevor Gibbens Unit Allington Centre Ravenswood House Brockfield House George McKenzie House Edenfield Centre Broadmoor Hospital Hellingly Centre Roseberry Park Hospital

16 Research being conducted across 21 sites (NHS and Non- NHS in the UK). Multi-Site Research Project Ardenleigh Guild Lodge Reaside Centre Independent Sector Alpha Hospital Bury St Andrews Healthcare Alpha Hospital Sheffield Waterloo Manor (Inmind) The Dene (PiC) Cygnet Hospital Derby Cygnet Hospital Stevenage NHS Newton Lodge Arnold Lodge Trevor Gibbens Unit Allington Centre Ravenswood House Brockfield House George McKenzie House Edenfield Centre Broadmoor Hospital Hellingly Centre Roseberry Park Hospital

17 Current Research (1)Do firesetters who have attended the firesetting treatment make pre-post treatment improvements on the treatment areas of interest? (2) How do these improvements or shifts compare with control firesetters who have not attended the programme? Research Questions

18 Control Group Psychometric Tests Time 1 28 week break Psychometric Tests Time 2 Current Research: Design Psychometric Tests Time 2 FIP-MO Treatment 28 Weeks Psychometric Tests Time 1 Treatment Group

19 12 FIP-MO groups (5 female and 7 male) Data collected for 35 treatment participants to date. Preliminary results for those who have completed treatment. Current Research

20 19 male and 16 female firesetters Aged 22 – 57 (M = 38.08, SD = 10.44) Majority White British/Irish (85.7%) All have a current psychiatric diagnosis Participants: Treatment Group

21 Treatment Need Time 1 M Time 2 M tdfp Violence Entitlement Antisocial Associates Results: Offence Supportive Attitudes Violence = 45.4% of sample showed a reduction Entitlement = 39.3% of sample showed a reduction Antisocial = 42.4% of sample showed a reduction Associates = 45.4% of sample showed a reduction

22 Results: Self Management/Coping Treatment NeedTime 1 M Time 2 M tdfp Experience of Intense Angry Feelings Anger Expression Locus of Control Experience of Intense Angry Feelings = 21.8% of sample showed a reduction Anger Expression = 63.6% of sample showed a reduction Locus of Control = 50% of sample showed a shift towards a more internal locus of control

23 Treatment NeedTime 1 M Time 2 M tdfp Self Esteem Assertiveness Emotional Loneliness Results: Communication/Relationships Self Esteem = 51.5% of sample showed an increase Assertiveness = 37.5% of sample showed an increase Emotional Loneliness = 30.3% of sample showed a reduction

24 Treatment Need Time 1 M Time 2 M tdfp Identification with Fire Serious fire Interest Fire Safety Awareness Everyday Fire Interest Normalisation of Fire Results: Fire Interest/Identification

25 Identification with fire = 54.5% of sample showed reduction Serious Fire Interest = 48.4 % of sample showed reduction Fire Safety Awareness = 72.7 % of sample showed increase Everyday Fire Interest = 54.5% of sample showed reduction Normalisation of Fire = 45.4% of sample showed reduction

26 “The worst thing about the group was waiting for it to start.” Patient Feedback “The group could have been better if it was shorter.” “The worst thing about the group was having to get up an hour earlier than usual.”

27 “I thought that the group was good, interesting, and will help me in the future.” Patient Feedback “The group helped me a lot.” “[The individual sessions] help you understand things you might not know about yourself. ” “I got a better understanding about myself than I did before and also it made me think twice about fires and made me realise they were more dangerous than what I thought.”

28 Preliminary findings suggest that FIP-MO is successful in addressing some of mentally disordered firesetters key deficits Discussion Patients report positive experience of FIP-MO Starting point for an evidence based intervention for patient benefit

29 Complete the full evaluation of FIP-MO (i.e., compare pre-post treatment shifts to those of control group) A New Structured Treatment Programme for the NHS? Examine any differences in treatment outcomes across gender Revise programme manual based on outcome of evaluation

30 Thank you! Contact


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