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Leeds Provider Network 5 th July 2013 Kevin Paynes 11-19 Lead, Learning Improvement Team, Leeds Children’s Services.

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Presentation on theme: "Leeds Provider Network 5 th July 2013 Kevin Paynes 11-19 Lead, Learning Improvement Team, Leeds Children’s Services."— Presentation transcript:

1 Leeds Provider Network 5 th July 2013 Kevin Paynes Lead, Learning Improvement Team, Leeds Children’s Services

2 Aims of the session To provide a national and local overview, particularly from a school perspective To explore the potential impact on providers

3 Key Drivers.... Nationally  The learning landscape continues to change:  Curriculum changes  Changes to the performance tables  Reducing the number of young people who are NEET  Destination measures

4 Key Drivers.... Locally  Major cuts to Council funding  School Budgets  On-going restructure of Children’s Services  Child Friendly City initiative  Post 16 Review/Funding changes  Ambition to be a NEET free city  Rising school standards  Demographics – falling then rising cohorts

5 Leeds Schools: The current position Of the 38 secondary schools in Leeds, there are : 16 Academies 2 schools close to becoming academies: John Smeaton / City of Leeds 20 LA maintained schools of which some are trusts All of the 6 SILCs (Special Schools) are currently LA maintained schools There is one Free School already open, two open in September and more in the pipeline

6 KS4: Some overall headlines from 2012 Attainment Improvements against most headline indicators at KS4 in 2012 but less than expected due to English grade boundary changes. 5A*-C including English and maths – 0.3% higher than in (Nationally results improved by just 0.1%) 5A*- C – a rise of 2.1% to 83.7% in This is above the national 5A*-G – a rise of 0.3% to 94.8%. The percentage of students leaving school with no qualifications has reduced by almost half, to 0.8%. English Baccalaureate (EBacc) - an increase of almost 1% to 14% (but below national)

7 Percentage of pupils achieving LeedsNational Stat Neigh LeedsNational Stat Neigh LeedsNational Stat Neigh 5+A*-C inc. English and maths A*- C A*-G No Passes EBacc Key Stage 4 overall performance (all pupils)

8 Progress Three levels of progress between Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 4 in English - down almost 4% to 61.9%, although the fall nationally was slightly greater. Three levels of progress between Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 4 in maths - up over 6% to 65.6% and a bigger increase than nationally. Value Added (based on best 8 subjects) – needs to be at school level These performance measures are now a key indicator used during Ofsted inspections.

9 Expected Levels of Progress in English and maths (all pupils) Percentage of pupils achieving LeedsNat Stat Neigh LeedsNat Stat Neigh LeedsNat Stat Neigh Expected Progress in English Expected Progress in maths

10 Attendance Attendance in Leeds secondary schools increased by 1.4% to 93.8% in 2011/12 – a greater improvement than nationally. In Leeds secondary schools, the percentage of pupils judged to persistently absent (PA) was 7.9%, which equates to just over three thousand pupils. This is a significant reduction from levels of persistent absence in 2010/11 (when there were c.4,500 PA pupils).

11 Another Key Driver.... Ofsted □ Leeds Rank: 94 of 151 LA’s nationally

12 Obtaining the views of registered parents and other stakeholders: Inspectors may wish to speak to key partners who work with the school. They should make every effort to make contact with/telephone those institutions where pupils are taught off-site to help assess the school’s quality assurance arrangements. They must evaluate the robustness with which the school monitors the attendance, behaviour, learning and progress of pupils that receive alternative provision. From the Ofsted Handbook

13 From the Evaluation Schedule (1) Inspectors must take account of: the learning and progress across year groups of different groups of pupils currently on the roll of the school. Evidence gathered may include: - the school’s own records of pupils’ progress, including the progress of pupils who attend off- site alternative provision for all or part of the week

14 From the Evaluation Schedule (2) (For Behaviour) Outstanding (Grade 1) ‘All groups of pupils feel safe at school and at alternative provision placements at all times. They understand very clearly what constitutes unsafe situations and are highly aware of how to keep themselves and others safe, including in relation to e-safety. ‘

15 From the Evaluation Schedule (3) (For Leadership and Management) Inspectors should consider: how effectively the school works in partnership with other schools, external agencies (for example national and local leaders of education) and the community (including business) to improve the school, extend the curriculum and increase the range and quality of learning opportunities for pupils the effectiveness of safeguarding arrangements to ensure that there is safe recruitment and that all pupils are safe. This includes: - the care taken to ensure that pupils placed in alternative provision are safe at all times. Outstanding (Grade 1) ‘ All groups of pupils feel safe at school and at alternative provision placements at all times. They understand very clearly what constitutes unsafe situations and are highly aware of how to keep themselves and others safe, including in relation to e- safety. ‘

16 Ofsted Feedback to Schools (1) Temple Moor □ Senior leaders have made good improvements in achievement and behaviour since the last inspection. Leaders work well with other schools and organisations to give students a wide range of learning opportunities □ Eighteen Key Stage 4 students attend off-site alternative provision which includes hair and beauty, construction and motor vehicle courses at Thomas Danby College, Leeds City College and Leeds College of Technology □ Good partnership working with other schools and colleges enables a small number of Key Stage 4 students to make good progress on part-time off-site courses which meet their needs and interests. Students’ off-site attendance and progress are monitored closely by the school

17 Ofsted Feedback to Schools (2) Ralph Thoresby □ Thirty-two students attend part or full-time off-site alternative provision with a range of providers including the Hunslet Club, Leeds Reach, Headingley Learning Centre, Burley Park Pupil Referral Unit, Educ8, Leeds College of Building, Central College of Beauty, Thomas Danby College, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and Huddersfield Football Club □ The number of Key Stage 4 students who attend alternative off-site provision has reduced because senior leaders recognised that not all students were making the progress they should □ Governance : The school takes reasonable steps to ensure the suitable behaviour and safety of students when attending off-site provision

18 Another Key Driver.... Learner numbers. The ‘Basic Need’ agenda

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21 Final messages: These are challenging times and will be in the coming years. But: Your services will still be needed – especially with the focus on disaffected/disengaged learners. What you offer is different and valued. Schools will continue to look closely at the cost of programmes You will need to be prepared to be flexible, to diversify, evolve…. You will need to continue to build close relationships with a range of partners And above all: Keep focusing on the quality, making sure that your learners can demonstrate achievement and progression

22 Any questions?


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