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Can a solid be superfluid? Symposium on Quantum Phenomena and Devices at Low Temperatures, 2008 Helsinki Univ. of Technology Moses Chan - Penn State.

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Presentation on theme: "Can a solid be superfluid? Symposium on Quantum Phenomena and Devices at Low Temperatures, 2008 Helsinki Univ. of Technology Moses Chan - Penn State."— Presentation transcript:

1 Can a solid be superfluid? Symposium on Quantum Phenomena and Devices at Low Temperatures, 2008 Helsinki Univ. of Technology Moses Chan - Penn State

2 Outline Introduction Torsional oscillator measurements. Origin of supersolidity : zero point vacancies, grain boundaries glassy regions or dislocations? Specific heat and dc flow experiments Conclusions

3 Theoretical ‘ consensus ’ in 1970s: Superfluidity in solid is not impossible! - If solid 4 He can be described by a Jastraw-type wavefunction that is commonly used to describe liquid helium then crystalline order (with finite fraction of vacancies) and BEC can coexist. G.V. Chester, Lectures in Theoretical Physics Vol XI-B(1969); Phys. Rev. A 2, 256 (1970) J. Sarfatt, Phys. Lett. 30A, 300 (1969) L. Reatto, Phys. Rev. 183, 334 (1969) - Andreev and Liftshitz assume the specific scenario of zero- point vacancies and other defects ( e.g. interstitial atoms) undergoing BEC and exhibit superfluidity. Andreev & Liftshitz, Zh.Eksp.Teor.Fiz. 56, 205 (1969).

4 f s (T) is the supersolid or nonclassical rotational inertia (NCRI) fraction. Its upper limit is estimated by different theorists to range from to 0.4; Leggett: Solid Helium R I(T)=I classical [1-f s (T)] Quantum exchange of particles arranged in an annulus under rotation leads to a measured moment of inertia that is smaller than the classical value The ideal method of detection of superfluidity is to subject solid to dc or ac rotation. Leggett, “Can a solid be superfluid?” PRL 25, 1543(1970)

5 Torsional Oscillator Technique is ideal for the detection of superfluidity Drive Detection 3.5 cm Torsion rod Torsion cell f0f0 ff Amp Quality Factor Q= f 0 /  f ~10 6 Stability in the period is ~0.1 ns Frequency resolution of 1 part in 10 7 Mass sensitivity of ~10 -7 g f~ 1kHz

6 Torsional oscillator studies of superfluid films I total = I cell + I helium film, Above Tc the adsorbed normal liquid film behaves as solid and oscillates with the cell. In the superfluid phase, helium film decouples from oscillation. Hence I total and drops. Vycor Berthold,Bishop, Reppy, PRL 39,348(1977) ΔΔ 

7 Bulk solid helium in annulus Torsion cell with helium in annulus Mg disk Filling line Solid helium in annular channel Al shell Channel OD=10mm Width=0.9mm Drive Detection 3.5 cm Torsion rod Torsion cell

8 E. Kim & M.H.W. Chan, Science 305, 1941 (2004) f 0 =912Hz Bulk solid helium in annulus 51bar Total mass loading = 3012ns Measured decoupling, -  o =41ns NCRIF = 1.4%

9 Total mass loading =3012ns at 51 bars ρS/ρρS/ρ |v| max Non-Classical Rotational Inertia Fraction

10 Superfluids exhibit potential (irrotational) flow – For our exact dimensions, NCRIF in the blocked cell should be about 1% that of the annulus* *E. Mueller, private communication. Irrotational Flow

11 Gap 73  m, NCRI = 16 % Top View: Blocked Top View: Open solid inertia Nonclassical rotational inertia Reversibly blocked annulus Rittner & Reppy, Cornell

12 Nonclassical rotational inertia results have been replicated in five other labs. The temperature dependence of NCRI is reproduced. However, the magnitude of NCRIF varies from 0.015% up to 16%. Simulations studies indicate NCRI is not possible in a ‘perfect’ crystal and that quantum zero point vacancies concentration is too low to account for the observations. (this conclusion not universally accepted). This leaves other defects, e.g. grain boundaries, glassy regions and dislocations as possible origins or at least ‘enhancer’ for NCRI.

13 Grain boundaries It has been suggested that the observed NCRI are due to atomically thin superfluid (liquid) films along the grain boundaries, if true, NCRI should scales with total grain boundary area. Grain size of solid 4 He inside Vycor glass is ~ 7nm and in bulk it is ~0.1 mm. This means the grain boundary surface differs by many orders of magnitude, but observed NCRI is about the same, ~1%. Nevertheless, most bulk solid samples grown by the blocked capillary method is polycrystalline. Does NCRI exists in a single crystal ?

14 Solid helium in Vycor glass  -  * [ns]  *=971,000ns 62bar Total mass loading = 4260ns Measured decoupling, -  o =17ns NCRI fraction, or NCRIF = 0.4% (with tortuosity, 2% ) f 0 =1024Hz 7nm E. Kim & M.H.W. Chan, Nature 427, 225 (2004).

15 High quality single crystals have been grown under constant temperature 1 and pressure 2 Best crystals grown in zero temperature limit Crystal Growth 1. O.W. Heybey & D.M. Lee, PRL 19, 106 (1967); S. Balibar, H. Alles & A. Ya Parshin, Rev. Mod. Phys. 77, 317 (2005). 2. L.P. Mezhov-Deglin, Sov. Phys. JETP 22, 47 (1966); D.S. Greywall, PRA 3, 2106 (1971).

16 Constant T/P growth from superfluid (1ppb 3 He) Heat in Heat out Q ~ 500,000 Tony Clark and Josh West

17 Solid 4 He (1ppb 3 He) grown under constant P/T from superfluid

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23 Samples grown under constant P/T from superfluid collapse onto one curve for T > 40mK and share common onset temperature, T C ~ 80mK. Superfluid film flow along grain boundary cannot be the ‘origin’ of NCRI.

24 High temperature tail of NCRI Transition broadened in BC samples (probably “polycrystalline”) and by 3 He impurities

25 Superfluid film along the grain boundaries cannot be the mechanism for NCRI. What is the most likely origin for the large variation in NCRI from cell to cell? Dislocation lines density in solid 4 He ranges from ~10 to 10 9 cm -2, sensitive to how the solid is nucleated and grown. But how does dislocations enable or enhance NCRI?

26 Two of the common types: edge & screw In solid 4 He Dislocation density,  = ~5  <10 10 cm -2 Dislocations

27 3 He impurities at “high” T Network pinning at the nodes 3 He impurities are not ‘attached’ to the dislocation lines.

28 Increasing fraction of 3 He atoms condense onto and stiffen dislocation network with decreasing T Iwasa et.al., J.Phys. Soc. Jpn. 46, 1119( 1979); Paalanen, Bishop and Dail, PRL 46, 664(1981)

29 3 He Effect ( bulk samples) E. Kim, J. S. Xia, J. T. West, X. Lin, A. C Clark, and M. H. W. Chan,, PRL 100, ( 2008)

30 Onset of NCRI tracks the expected temp. of 3 He condensation onto dislocation

31 Direct measurement of the Shear Modulus James Day and John Beamish, Nature (London) 450, 853 (2007).

32 Shear Modulus mirrors NCRI James Day and John Beamish, Nature (London) 450, 853 (2007).

33 The increase in shear modulus and the onset of NCRI at low T must be related, but how? An increase in shear modulus of solid 4 He in TO can result an increase in its resonant freq., ie. the same sign as the observed NCRI. But simulation studies shows the magnitude of the ‘Beamish’ effect is typically orders of magnitudes smaller than that observed in most TOs. The ‘Beamish’ effect or shear modulus stiffening cannot explain the blocked annulus experiments. It has been suggested (Anderson) that the onset of supersolidity stiffens the shear modulus. Simulations show the dislocation lines are ‘superfluid’ and it has been suggested that the onset of NCRI requires a ‘rigid’ dislocation network.

34 What about the superglass model? Since glass has no crystalline order, it is thought superfluidity is more likely to occur. If this is the case there should be thermodynamic signatures ( e.g. thermal hysteresis, and linear specific heat)

35 Heat capacity Is there a thermodynamic signature of the transition? There is no specific heat information on solid 4 He below 200 mK. The heat capacity of metal container swamps the contribution of solid 4 He

36 Heat Capacity measurements in a Silicon cell Si Al Glass Capillary Stycast 2850 Heater Thermometer Reasons for Si: Low heat capacity: High thermal conductivity: Helium Volume= 0.926cc 1.5 cm 0.1mm ID Heat capacity of solid 4 He is more than 10 times larger than the Si cell over the entire temp. range

37 AC Calorimetry 1.Paul F. Sullivan, G. Seidel, Phys Rev. 173, 679 (1968). 2.Yaakov Kraftmakher, Physics Reports, 356 (2002) Internal time constant << 1/ω External time constant >> 1/ω KbKb Sample Thermal Bath Thermometer KΘKΘ Heater KhKh

38 Specific heat of commercially pure 4 He (0.3ppm 3 He) Constant volume technique. 20 hours to finish solidification. No long time constant. No hysteresis No annealing effect No thermal cycle effect log C vs. log T

39 Specific heat of solid 4 He (0.3ppm & 1ppb) log C vs. log T

40 C/T vs. T 2 Data above 140 mK extrapolate to zero

41 ‘Linear T’ term from Pressure measurements ? Freshly grown sample Annealed sample (19.83cc/mole)  — Grüneisen constant ρ — molar volume C V ~T n P~T n+1 PHYSICAL REVIEW B 76, V. N. Grigor'ev et al

42 Specific heat with Debye phonon term subtracted T 3 subtracted ~20  J mol −1 K −1 ~2.5×10 -6 k B per 4 He atom

43 Solid sample grown under constant pressure condition has the smallest peak. T 3 subtracted Higher resolution in 2008 sample cell T 3 subtracted Minimum Temperature 25mK New preliminary result with a more sensitive thermometer. Disadvantage of Si? 8 out of 10 cells leaks under high pressure 4 hours to solidify a sample.

44 Comparison with the Helsinki melting curve measurement. No anomaly in melting curve after correction for instrumental effect. Discrepancy we don’t understand Todoschenko et al., PRL 97, (2006); JETP Lett. 85, 555 (2007). Constant pressure 1ppb 2008 Constant volume 1ppb 2008

45 dc ( superfluid-like ) flow? Greywall and Beamish carried out experiments by increasing pressure on one end of a solid ( bulk or in Vycor glass) sample. No evidence of flow. Balibar and collaborators saw flow in liquid-solid coexistence samples. The observed phenomenon is likely a consequence of liquid film flow through the ‘crack’ in the solid.

46 DC superflow reported by ‘pushing’ on superfluid in contact with solid : ‘UMass Sandwich’ (R.B. Hallock) 3 12 R, reservoirs V, Vycor S, sample C1C2

47 Conclusions NCRI or superfluid like behavior seen in solid 4 He in 7 labs. Shear modulus increases at low temperature, the temperature dependence of the increases mimics that of NCRI It is possible that either (1) NCRI ‘requires’ a rigid dislocation network, or (2) onset of NCRI stiffens the solid lattice. No evidence of linear T term in specific heat, but a peak near NCRI onset is seen, size of peak is smaller for a ‘higher’ quality sample. Preliminary dc superfluid flow through solid helium reported.

48 Xi, Tony, Eunseong, Josh

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50 Lindemann Parameter the ratio of the root mean square of the displacement of atoms to the interatomic distance (d a ) A classical solid will melt if the Lindemann ’ s parameter exceeds the critical value of ~0.1. X-ray measurement of the Debye-Waller factor of solid helium at ~0.7K and near melting curve shows this ratio to be (Burns and Issacs, Phys. Rev. B 55, 5767(1997)) Zero-point Energy Inter-atomic potential total energy zero-point energy

51 Solid 4 He at 62 bars in Vycor glass Period shifted by 4260ns due to mass loading of solid helium  *=966,000ns

52 Strong and ‘universal’ velocity dependence in all annular samples v C ~ 10µm/s =3.16µm/s for n=1 ω R Vortices are important

53 Blocked capillary (BC) method of growing solid samples heat drain Be-Cu torsion rod and fill-line solid blocks fill-line gravity

54 Supersolid response of helium in Vycor glass Period drops at 175mK  appearance of non-classical rotational inertia (NCRI) size of period drop -  ~17ns  *=971,000ns 

55  -  *[ns]  *=971,000ns 3 He impurity effect in Vycor

56 Solid helium in porous gold E. Kim & M.H.W. Chan, JLTP 138, 859 (2005). f 0 =359Hz 27bar Total mass loading = 1625ns Measured decoupling, -  o =13ns NCRIF = 0.8% (with tortuosity, 1.2% ) 490nm

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58 Specific heat with the temperature independent constant term subtracted

59 Previous solid 4 He heat capacity measurements below 1K Year Low temperature limit Swenson , K Edwards K Gardner K Adams K Hebral K Clark K 1.E. C. Heltemes and C. A. Swenson, Phys. Rev. 128, 1512 (1962); H. H. Sample and C. A. Swenson, Phys. Rev. 158, 188 (1967). 2.D. O. Edwards and R. C. Pandorf, Phys. Rev. 140, A816 (1965). 3.W. R. Gardner et al., Phys. Rev. A 7, 1029 (1973). 4.S. H. Castles and E. D. Adams, J. Low Temp. Phys. 19, 397 (1975). 5.B. Hébral et al., Phonons in Condensed Matter, edited by H. J. Maris (Plenum, New York, 1980), pg A. C. Clark and M. H. W. Chan, J. Low Temp. Phys. 138, 853 (2005). They all observed T 3 phonon contribution. Their sample cells used in these experiments were all constructed with heavy wall metal or epoxy which contribute significantly to the heat capacity at low temperature.

60 Results: 4 He at different 3 He concentrations in glass capillary cell No long time constant. No hysteresis No change due to annealing No thermal cycle effect Constant volume technique

61 C vs T 3 Constant contribution from 3 He impurity 10ppm sample 0.7+/-0.2 k B per 3 He 30ppm sample 1.7+/-0.3 k B per 3 He

62 Is there a linear T term? For 0.3ppm, T>0.14K T 3 relation only

63 NMR measurement of spin ( 3 He) diffusion: A. R. Allen, M. G. Richards & J. Schratter J. Low Temp. Phys. 47, 289 (1982). M. G. Richards, J. Pope & A. Widom, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 708 (1972).

64 Results: pure 4 He (0.3ppm & 1ppb) Ln C vs. Ln T What is the deviation?

65 Previous solid 4 He heat capacity measurements below 1K Year Low temperature limit Swenson , K Edwards K Gardner K Adams K Hebral K Clark K 1.E. C. Heltemes and C. A. Swenson, Phys. Rev. 128, 1512 (1962); H. H. Sample and C. A. Swenson, Phys. Rev. 158, 188 (1967). 2.D. O. Edwards and R. C. Pandorf, Phys. Rev. 140, A816 (1965). 3.W. R. Gardner et al., Phys. Rev. A 7, 1029 (1973). 4.S. H. Castles and E. D. Adams, J. Low Temp. Phys. 19, 397 (1975). 5.B. Hébral et al., Phonons in Condensed Matter, edited by H. J. Maris (Plenum, New York, 1980), pg A. C. Clark and M. H. W. Chan, J. Low Temp. Phys. 138, 853 (2005). They all observed T 3 phonon contribution. Their sample cells used in these experiments were all constructed with heavy wall metal or epoxy which contribute significantly to the heat capacity at low temperature.

66 Results from Edwards and Hebral The background problem Edwards Hebral Effect of changing 1% of the empty cell

67 Results: pure 4 He (0.3ppm) Temperature scale based on 3 He melting curve Minimum temperature 40mK

68 Specific heat peak is found when T 3 term subtracted The peak is independent of 3 He concentration Peak height: 20 μJ mol -1 K -1 (2.5 x k B per 4 He atom) Excess entropy: 28 μ J mol -1 K -1 (3.5 x k B per 4 He atom)

69 BC samples can also be grown Heat out Q ~ 500,000

70 Granato-Lucke applied to 4 He Dislocations pinned by network, 3 He, jogs? Typical L N in pure 4 He crystals ~ 5  m

71 Ln C vs. Ln T

72 Compare with torsional oscillator

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74 Solid 4 He at various pressures show similar temperature dependence, but the measured supersolid fraction shows scatter with no obvious pressure dependence NCRIF

75 Pressure dependence of supersolid fraction Blue data points were obtained by seeding the solid helium samples from the bottom of the annulus. NCRIF What are the causes of the scatter in NCRIF?

76 Pressure dependence of supersolid fraction Blue data points were obtained by seeding the solid helium samples from the bottom of the annulus. NCRIF What are the causes of the scatter in NCRIF?

77 Thermal history of 1ppb samples Velocity changes at low temperature lead to interesting behavior… Protocol followed below: (1) cooling, (2) velocity increase, (3) warming, (4) cooling

78 End

79 Specific heat with T 3 term subtracted Peak height: 20 μJ mol -1 K -1 (2.5 x k B per 4 He atom) Excess entropy: 28 μ J mol -1 K -1 (3.5 x k B per 4 He atom) 1.Specific heat peak is independent of 3 He concentrations. 2.Assuming 3D-xy universality class (same as the lambda transition in liquid 4 He). 3.Use two-scale-factor universality hypothesis, ρ s ~0.06%. 1ppb study of TO found this number lays between 0.03% and 0.3%.

80 Hysteresis in Pressure measurement of phase separation A.N.Gan'shin, V.N.Grigor'ev, V.A.Maidanov, N.F.Omelaenko, A.A.Penzev, É.Ya.Rudavskii, A.S.Rybalko., Low Temp. Phys. 26, 869 (2000).

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82 Two of the common types: edge & screw Dislocation density,  = ~5  <10 10 cm -2 –3-d network, L N ~ 1 to 10  m (  ~10 5 to 10 7 ) [L N ~ 0.1 to 1  m (  ~10 9 )] Dislocations

83 Dislocations intersect on a characteristic length scale of L N ~ 1  5  m Dislocations can also be pinned by 3 He impurities –Distance between 3 He atoms (if uniformly distributed): –1ppb  1000a ~ 0.3  m –0.3ppm  150a ~ 45nm –1%  5a ~ 15nm Granato-Lucke applied to 4 He

84 3 He-dislocation interaction Actual 3 He concentration on dislocation line is thermally activated *Typical binding energy, W 0 is 0.3K to 0.7K

85 3 He-dislocations interaction Line considered as crossover from network pinning to 3 He impurity pinning of dislocations (L Network ~ L 3He spacing ) Average length L Network ~ 1 to 10  m For  ~ 10 5 to 10 6 cm -2 Smaller lengths (< 1  m) are expected for larger dislocation densities

86 Solid helium in Vycor glass Weak pressure dependence… from 40 to 65bar Strong velocity dependence

87  -  *[ns]  *=971,000ns Question: If there is a transition between the normal and supersolid phases, where is the transition temperature? 3 He- 4 He mixtures

88 3 He- 4 He mixtures ( inside Vycor)

89 Frequency dependence -T O increases with frequency -Low temperature NCRIF unchanged Aoki, Graves & Kojima, PRL 99, (2007). ~150mK ~220mK


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