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Www.davidhitchcock.co.uk MANUAL HANDLING DAVID HITCHCOCK BSc FErgS EurErg CMIOSH FRSH.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.davidhitchcock.co.uk MANUAL HANDLING DAVID HITCHCOCK BSc FErgS EurErg CMIOSH FRSH."— Presentation transcript:

1 MANUAL HANDLING DAVID HITCHCOCK BSc FErgS EurErg CMIOSH FRSH

2 MANUAL HANDLING BACKGROUND The reasons why manual handling is such an important issue and the legislation aimed at protecting people from the risks. THE RISKS A look at the gamut of manual handling risks – and how to avoid or manage them. RISK ASSESSMENT Assessing risk using the MAC tool and the L23 assessment. GOOD PRACTICE The principles of good manual handling practice PROGRAMME

3 MANUAL HANDLING BACKGROUND BACKGROUND

4 MANUAL HANDLING HSE national priority 36% of over 3 day injuries are classed as ‘manual handling’ Over 100,000 reports of first incidence of lower back pain each year Nearly 6 million working days lost each year due to back problems THE PROBLEM

5 MANUAL HANDLING INJURIES “Single episode” is often actually the result of cumulative trauma

6 MANUAL HANDLING THE NEUTRAL GOAL

7 MANUAL HANDLING AVOID (Reg 4(1)(a)) hazardous operations ASSESS (Reg 4(1)(b)(i)) any hazardous operations that cannot be avoided REDUCE (Reg 4(1)(b)(ii)) the risk of injury MONITOR / CONTROL (Reg 4(2)) to further reduce the risks MANAGE (Reg 5) LEGAL REQUIREMENTS

8 MANUAL HANDLING THE REQUIREMENTS OF ASSESSMENT “That Looks Hard” Check Break Tasks Down Look at Each Factor Chip Away Overall Risk Reduced “That Looks Easier” Double Check

9 MANUAL HANDLING WHO IS AFFECTED ? Who /Job TitleWhat Do They Do?Where?

10 MANUAL HANDLING ADVICE ADVICE LEAFLETS LEAFLETS BOOKS BOOKS USEFUL HSE RESOURCES

11 MANUAL HANDLING THE RISKS

12 MANUAL HANDLING A MATTER OF ERGONOMICS Manual Handling Task Individual Load Environment

13 MANUAL HANDLING TASK FACTORS Reaching/holding away from the body Twisting the body Stooping downwards Lifting from floor Lifting above shoulder Poor workplace layout Long carrying distances Static postures/lifting

14 MANUAL HANDLING TASK FACTORS Frequency Prolonged effort Repetition Insufficient rest or recovery Imposed work rate Team handling

15 MANUAL HANDLING INDIVIDUAL FACTORS Gender differences Size differences Age considerations Pre-existing conditions Pregnancy

16 MANUAL HANDLING LOAD FACTORS Weight Bulk Grasp Stability Predictably Intrinsic harm

17 MANUAL HANDLING ENVIRONMENT FACTORS Postural constraints Slippery/contaminated floors Variations in levels Lighting Temperature Air movements PPE

18 MANUAL HANDLING ‘SPOT THE HAZARDS 1’

19 MANUAL HANDLING ‘SPOT THE HAZARDS 2’

20 MANUAL HANDLING ‘SPOT THE HAZARDS 3’

21 MANUAL HANDLING RISK ASSESSMENT

22 MANUAL HANDLING RISK ASSESSMENT MACL23

23 MANUAL HANDLING L23

24 MANUAL HANDLING L23 : 3-STAGE PROCESS 1 Risk Filter 2 Preliminary Assessment 3 Detailed Assessment

25 MANUAL HANDLING L23 : RISK FILTER

26 MANUAL HANDLING L23 : EXAMPLE ASSUMPTIONS Only guideline figures for 95% of handlers Load is easy to grasp Environment is reasonable Movement reductions: FrequencyReduction to Guidelines TwistReduction to Guidelines 1-2 per min 30% 45° 10% 5-8 per min 50% 90° 20% 12 per min 80%

27 MANUAL HANDLING L23 : FURTHER ASSESSMENT PreliminaryDetailed

28 MANUAL HANDLING PUSHING & PULLING 350 – 450 N N 48 N 742 N 200 N 450 N LOW RISK MODERATE RISK – Changes in the short/medium term HIGH RISK – Immediate changes required

29 MANUAL HANDLING MAC

30 MANUAL HANDLING MAC LOW LEVEL OF RISK The vulnerability of special risk groups should be considered where appropriate. MEDIUM LEVEL OF RISK Examine tasks closely HIGH LEVEL OF RISK Prompt action needed – a significant proportion of workers may be at risk of injury VERY HIGH LEVEL OF RISK Stop the task immediately and make improvement measures.

31 MANUAL HANDLING MAC FOR LIFTING TASKS

32 MANUAL HANDLING MAC FOR CARRYING TASKS

33 MANUAL HANDLING MAC FOR TEAM HANDLING TASKS

34 MANUAL HANDLING MAC SCORE SHEET

35 MANUAL HANDLING GOOD PRACTICE

36 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 1 OF 11 Think Before You Lift Plan the lift. Where is the load going to be placed? Use appropriate handling aids if possible. Do you need help with the load? Remove obstructions such as discarded wrapping materials. Think about the best way of lifting this load. For a long lift ‑ such as floor to shoulder height ‑ consider resting the load mid ‑ way on a table or bench in order to change grip.

37 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 2 OF 11 Keep the Load Close to Your Waist Keep the load close to the trunk for as long as possible. The distance of the load from the spine at waist height is an important factor in the overall load on your spine and back muscles. Keep the heaviest side of the load next to your body. If a close approach to the load is not possible try sliding it towards you before attempting to lift it.

38 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 3 OF 11 Adopt a Stable Position Have the feet slightly apart with one leg slightly forward to help maintain balance (alongside the load if it is on the ground). Be prepared to move your feet during the lift to maintain a stable posture.

39 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 4 OF 11 Get a Good Hold on the Load Try hugging it close to the body if possible. This may be better than gripping it tightly only with your hands.

40 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 5 OF 11 Something New !!!! At the start of the lift, moderate flexion (slight bending) of the back, hips and knees is preferable to fully flexing the back (stooping) or the hips and knees (squatting).

41 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 6 OF 11 Don’t Flex the Back Further This can happen as you lift if you begin to straighten your legs before starting to raise the load.

42 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 7 OF 11 Avoid Twisting or Leaning… especially while the back is bent. Keep shoulders level and facing in the same direction as the hips. Turning (by moving the feet) after lifting is better than twisting and lifting at the same time.

43 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 8 OF 11 Keep the Head Up Look ahead, not down at the load once you have grasped it and secured it.

44 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 9 OF 11 Move Smoothly Try not to jerk or snatch at the load as this can make it harder to keep control of the load and can increase the risk of injury.

45 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 10 OF 11 Limit to What Can be Easily Managed There is a difference between what you can lift and what you can safely lift. If in doubt, seek advice or get help.

46 MANUAL HANDLING STEP 11 OF 11 Put Down Then Adjust If precise positioning of the load is necessary, put it down first, then slide it into the desired position.

47 MANUAL HANDLING GOING A BIT FURTHER ISBN-10:


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