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Are you a thief?. Plagiarism Plagiarism is THEFT! It is theft of intellectual property.

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Presentation on theme: "Are you a thief?. Plagiarism Plagiarism is THEFT! It is theft of intellectual property."— Presentation transcript:

1 Are you a thief?

2 Plagiarism Plagiarism is THEFT! It is theft of intellectual property

3 Plagiarism Plagiarism is the use of other people's ideas without due acknowledgment. It is about presenting other people's ideas as your own.

4 Plagiarism Plagiarism can be intentional – which is unethical and totally unacceptable. It may also be illegal or actionable and your employment prospects can be severely affected Likewise your academic prospects!

5 Plagiarism Plagiarism can be intentional – which is unethical and totally unacceptable. It may also be illegal or actionable and your employment prospects can be severely affected Likewise your academic prospects! Plagiarism can also be unintentional – you don't realise you are doing it. This is lazy,sloppy and unprofessional

6 Plagiarism Plagiarism can be intentional – which is unethical and totally unacceptable. It may also be illegal or actionable and your employment prospects can be severely affected Likewise your academic prospects! Plagiarism can also be unintentional – you don't realise you are doing it. This is lazy,sloppy and unprofessional Whatever the case, plagiarism is plagiarism and cases are always treated in the same way

7 Plagiarism Here are some examples: Copying someone's project report, with or without their knowledge Claiming to have done something someone else did Fabricating experimental results Pasting text or pictures straight from the web Typing in passages from text books

8 Plagiarism The first is usually easy to spot and the penalties can be severe Complicit copying (collusion): 50% of mark down to zero and possibly a note in student progress record - usually up to module leader or Degree Programme Director.

9 Plagiarism The first is usually easy to spot and the penalties can be severe Complicit copying (collusion): 50% of mark down to zero and possibly a note in student progress record - usually up to module leader or Degree Programme Director. Explicit copying: usually zero marks plus a warning. In repeat or outrageous cases, appearance before HoS – perhaps even report to Registrar Explicit copying also covers using a work from a previous year

10 Plagiarism Claiming someone else's work as their own can also be spotted from a knowledge of a student's capability An example might be where a student submits a design report using work that someone else in the group actually did

11 Plagiarism Fabricating results: Some famous examples of scientists fabricating results – but students also do it. Miss the labs and make up the data. Easy to spot – data is usually too good and the student misses the obvious flaws of the equipment.

12 Plagiarism Pasting text or pictures straight from the web or typing in passages from text books and journals

13 Plagiarism Pasting text or pictures straight from the web or typing in passages from text books and journals Nothing wrong with this if it is done correctly and the audience knows what's going on.

14 Plagiarism Pasting text or pictures straight from the web or typing in passages from text books and journals Nothing wrong with this if it is done correctly and the audience knows what's going on. Sometimes you may need permisssion

15 Plagiarism Text, quotations, ideas from other sources may be used to support your arguments – but they must be referenced, and due credit given.

16 Plagiarism Note possible issues of copyright Especially for: images extensive chunks of text work of practical value (eg tutorials)

17 Plagiarism Some examples

18 Plagiarism It is a truism that everyone cares about the environment and agrees that actions must be taken but no one wants to take responsibility for actions which directly affect members of the public as individuals. The recent statements emanating from the USA that in fact global warming might well increase agricultural production challenge popular opinion even further. We do not concur with this point of view

19 Plagiarism Chunks of actual text, such as quotations, should be put between quote marks (“text”). Use a referencing system or a footnote to acknowledge. According to Harvey [2004] “It is a truism that everyone cares about the environment and agree that actions must be taken but no one wants to take responsibility for actions which directly affect members of the public as individuals. The recent statements emanating from the USA that in fact global warming might well increase agricultural production challenge popular opinion even further.” We do not concur with this point of view

20 Plagiarism Alternatively, you may want to make a statement but the statement is derived from some other work. The source must be acknowledged (referenced) Commitments from various countries to energy reduction may have been perceived to be relevant to ordinary members of the public until the refusal of the USA to implement the Kyoto agreement challenged popular opinion [Fells, 2000]

21 Plagiarism References The Harvard 'Author-date' system For boiling point estimation we used the Meissner [Perry, 2001] equation. According to Harvey [2004], central collection facilities are vital for a robust recycling initiative. References are listed at the end of a report in a 'Reference' section. References are listed in alphabetical order

22 Plagiarism Entering the references Harvey J, Joyce S [2004] Public perceptions of sustainability, energy efficiency and recycling: how these can inform the design process, 2 nd International Conference on Design for Sustainability, pp , Cambridge, UK, Perry, R. [2001] The Chemical Engineer's Handbook, Section 3, p.286, McGraw Hill, New York

23 Plagiarism References The British Standard numeric system For boiling point estimation we used the Meissner [3] equation. According to Harvey 5, central collection facilities are vital for a robust recycling initiative. References are listed at the end of a report in a 'Reference' section. References are listed in numerical order

24 Plagiarism Entering the references Perry, R. The Chemical Engineer's Handbook, Section 3, p.286, McGraw Hill, New York, Harvey J, Joyce S, Norman P, Public perceptions of sustainability, energy efficiency and recycling: how these can inform the design process, 2 nd International Conference on Design for Sustainability, pp , Cambridge, UK, 2004

25 Plagiarism References - or Bibliography? Refer to: "Cite them right : referencing made easy" Richard Pears and Graham Shields Northumbria University Newcastle upon Tyne, England, 2004 ISBN “Cite them right : the essential guide to referencing and plagiarism” Richard Pears and Graham Shields [Rev., expanded ed.] Newcastle upon Tyne : Pear Tree Books, 2005 ISBN Library: Study Skills, Student Texts, Oversize L3

26 Plagiarism A test you can do: and some references to check:

27 Finally Basic rules for students: DO NOT: + write about someone else’s ideas as if they were your own + write about someone else’s ideas without giving a reference + use someone else’s words exactly without indicating that it is a direct quote and referencing it + use more or less the same words as another writer even if you acknowledge their work + copy another student’s work + submit work written for you by another person + cut and paste material from the internet, putting pieces of text together to form an essay. ALWAYS: + cite your references


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