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1 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Parallelising Pipelined Wavefront Computations on the.

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Presentation on theme: "1 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Parallelising Pipelined Wavefront Computations on the."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Parallelising Pipelined Wavefront Computations on the GPU S.J. Pennycook G.R. Mudalige, S.D. Hammond, and S.A. Jarvis. High Performance Systems Group Department of Computer Science University of Warwick U.K S.J. Pennycook G.R. Mudalige, S.D. Hammond, and S.A. Jarvis. High Performance Systems Group Department of Computer Science University of Warwick U.K 1st UK CUDA Developers Conference 7 th Dec 2009 – Oxford, U.K. 1st UK CUDA Developers Conference 7 th Dec 2009 – Oxford, U.K.

2 2 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Overview  Wavefront Computations  A GPGPU Solution?  Wavefronts within Wavefronts  Performance Modelling  Beating the CPU – Optimisations to Win  Results, Validations and Model Projections  Current and Future Work  Conclusions

3 3 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Wavefront Computations  Wavefront computations are at the core of a number of large scientific computing workloads.  Centers including the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the United States and the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the UK use these codes heavily.  Lamport’s core (hyperplane) algorithm that underpins these codes has existed for more than thirty five years.  Defining characteristics:  Operating on a grid of cells with each cell requiring some computation to be performed.  Each cell has a data dependency, such that the solution of up to three neighbouring cells is required.

4 4 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Cell Dependencies

5 5 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Motivation  Our previous work was on analysing and optimising applications that use the wavefront algorithm using MPI. Processor (1,m) Processor (1,1) Processor (n,m) Processor (n,1) Ny Nz Nx Proceeds as Wavefronts through the 3D data cube

6 6 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Motivation (cont’d)  Algorithm operates over a three-dimensional structure of size Nx ×Ny ×Nz.  Grid is mapped onto a 2D m x n grid of processors; each is assigned a stack of Nx / n x Ny / m x Nz cells.  Data dependency results in a sequence of wavefronts (or a sweep) that starts from one corner and makes its way through other cells.  We have modelled codes (e.g. Chimaera, LU, and Sweep3D) that employ wavefront computations with MPI.

7 7 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Motivation (cont’d)  Our focus is now on using GPUs to investigate improvements to the solution per processor.  A canonical solution is normally employed by the CPU to solve the computation per processor.  Listing: Canonical Algorithm For k=1; k<=kend do For j=1; j<=jend do For i=1; i<=iend do A(i,j,k)=A(i−1,j,k)+ A(i,j−1,k)+A(i,j,k−1) // Compute cell End for

8 8 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Hyperplane (Wavefront) Algorithm  Let f = i + j + k, g = k and h = j.  The plane defined by i + j + k = CONST is called a hyperplane.  Listing : Hyperplane Algorithm DO CONCURRENTLY ON EACH PROCESSOR For f = 3, iend+jend+kend do A(f−g−h,h,g) = A(f−g−h−1,h,g)+A(f−g−h,h−1,g)+ A(f − g − h, h, g − 1) End For  The critical dependencies are preserved, even though the solution is carried out across the grid in wavefronts.

9 9 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 A GPGPU Solution ?  Can we utilise the many cores on a GPU to get a speedup to this algorithm?  Theoretically simple...

10 10 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 A GPGPU Solution ? (cont’d)  For a 3D cube of cells:

11 11 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 GPU Limitations  What’s the practical situation?  Experimental System – Daresbury Laboratory U.K.  8 x NVIDIA Tesla S1070 servers, each with four Tesla C1060 cards.  Compute nodes consists of Nehalem processors 2.53 GHz quad-core, 24 GB RAM).  Each CPU core sees one Tesla card.  Voltaire HCA410-4EX InfiniBand adapter.  NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU Specifications:  Each GPU card has 30 multi-processors – Streaming Multiprocessor (SM) with 8 cores per processor.  Each card therefore has 240 cores (streaming processor cores).  Each core operates at to 1.44 GHz.  4 GB Memory per card.

12 12 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 GPU Limitations (cont’d)  CUDA Device Architecture: SM 1 SM 2 SM 4 SM 30 RegistersShared Memory Processor Cores (8 cores) GPU Constant and Texture Cache Memory DRAM Local Global Constant Texture To Host

13 13 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 GPU Limitations (cont’d)  Each SM is allocated a number of threads, arranged as blocks.  No synchronisation between threads in different blocks.  Limit of 512 threads per block.  Memory hierarchy:  Global memory access is slow and should be avoided.  Limit of 16KB of shared memory per SM.  Other considerations:  Limit of 16,384 registers per block.  Aligning half-warps for performance.

14 14 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 A Solution ?  Wavefronts within Wavefronts  Need to be scalable. Run more than 512 threads by utilising parallelism across all the multiprocessors.  The cells on each diagonal are decomposed into coarse subtasks, and assigned to an SM as thread blocks.

15 15 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Wavefronts within Wavefronts  Each diagonal is computed by a kernel: for (wave = 0; wave < (3*(N/dimBlock.x)) - 2; wave++) { // Run the kernel. hyperplane_3d >> (d_gpu, wave); } cudaThreadSynchronize(); // Not strictly necessary.  The time to compute one diagonal is ≈ ceiling (number of blocks per diagonal / number of SMs)  Each block utilises the resources available to an SM to solve the cells – we will talk about this later.

16 16 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 A Performance Model  What does this solution mean in terms of a performance model?  Modelling Block level performance  Assume a 3D cube of data cells with dimension N  P GPU – Number of SMs on the GPU  W g,GPU – Time to solve a block of cells  W GPU – Time to solve the 3D cube of cells using the GPU

17 17 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Initial Results  Each cell is randomly initialised, and at each step calculates the average of itself and its top, north and west neighbours.  How the 3D data is decomposed has a significant effect on execution time.  Strange behaviour where the number of cells is a multiple of 32 (especially at powers of 2).

18 18 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Initial Results (cont’d)

19 19 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Initial Results (cont’d)

20 20 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Initial Results (cont’d)

21 21 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Beating the CPU  Optimisation within the blocks:  Thread re-use.  Caching values in shared memory.  Coalesced memory accesses.  Avoiding shared memory bank-conflicts.  Optimisations over the blocks:  Explicit vs implicit CPU synchronisation.  Inter-block synchronisation using mutexes.

22 22 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Thread Reuse in a Block Thread 0 Thread 4 Thread 1 Thread 8 Thread 5 Thread 2Thread 3 Thread 6 Thread 9 Thread 12Thread 13 Thread 10 Thread 7 Thread 11 Thread 14Thread 15

23 23 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Coalesced Memory Access  Requires padding on devices below compute capability 1.3.  How does this apply to 3D?

24 24 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Beating the CPU (Results)

25 25 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Beating the CPU (Results)  Code was restructured for GPU to avoid unnecessary branching. Similar restructuring applied to CPU in kind.  Re-use of threads and shared memory offers a 2x speedup over the naive GPU implementation.  Spikes remain, likely to be an issue at the warp level.  Kernel information:  17 registers.  2948 bytes of shared memory per block.  42% occupancy.

26 26 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 The Bigger Picture  Current work:  Porting LU, Sweep3D and Chimaera to GPU. (CUDA and OpenCL)  Additional barriers from larger programs:  Double precision.  Multiple computations per cell.  Looking towards the future:  How well does our algorithm perform on a consumer card (eg GTX 295)?  How well will our algorithm perform on Fermi?  Benchmarking and analysis should facilitate predictions.

27 27 High Performance Systems Group – Dept. Of Computer Science, University of Warwick U.K. Dec 2009 Conclusions  Wavefront computations can utilise emerging GPU architectures, despite their dependencies.  To see speedup:  Memcpy() needs to be faster.  Require more work per Memcpy().  Codes cannot be ported naively. Hardware limitations may be a problem (particularly for larger codes).  Performance modelling will offer insights into which applications can be ported successfully.


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