Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The UK physical activity guidelines for early years and the benefits of physical activity for this age group.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The UK physical activity guidelines for early years and the benefits of physical activity for this age group."— Presentation transcript:

1 The UK physical activity guidelines for early years and the benefits of physical activity for this age group

2 UK physical activity guidelines UK-wide (joint CMOs) Global evidence of the health benefits Life course Includes sedentary Recommended amount for general health benefit Apply to all

3 Why the need for UK physical activity guidelines for the early years? New evidence available Follow lead of other major countries Previous children and young people guidelines not appropriate for early years

4 UK physical activity guidelines: Early years 1 Guideline 1 (infants who cannot yet walk unaided) Physical activity should be encouraged from birth, particularly through floor- based play and water-based activities in safe environments.

5 Types of physical activity: Non-walkers 1 Guideline 1 Crawl, roll, play on floor ‘Tummy time’ New movements using large muscle groups Reaching for and grasping objects, pulling, pushing and playing with other people ‘Parent and baby’ swim sessions

6 UK physical activity guidelines: Early years 1 Guideline 2 Children of pre-school age who are capable of walking unaided should be physically active daily for at least 180 minutes (3 hours), spread throughout the day.

7 Types of physical activity: Walkers 1 Guideline 2 Unstructured, physically active play Energetic play Develop motor skills (locomotor, stability and object control) Active travel and everyday activities

8 UK physical activity guidelines: early years 1 Guideline 3 All under-fives should minimise the amount of time spent being sedentary (being restrained or sitting) for extended periods (except time spent sleeping).

9 Sedentary behaviour 1 Sedentary behaviour refers to a group of behaviours that occur whilst sitting or lying down and that typically require very low energy expenditure. Research is at an early stage and consequences are not fully understood. A risk factor for poor health independent of physical activity.

10 Minimising sedentary behaviour 1 Guideline 3 Reducing time spent in highchairs, infant carriers or buggies. Reducing time spent in front of the TV or other screens. Replacing motorised travel with active travel all or part of the way.

11 Active children… Active adults ? Physical activity patterns established in the early years persist at a moderate level into the primary school years Establishing a high level of physical activity early on in life may have implications for activity levels in later childhood and beyond

12 Impact of physical activity on whole child 1 Health and wellbeing Improves cardiovascular health Promotes healthy weight Enhances bone and muscular development Develops motor skills, movement and co-ordination Improves cognitive development Supports learning of social skills Improves self-confidence

13 Impact of physical activity on the whole child 2-4 Health and wellbeing Essential component for energy balance and weight control. Higher levels of inactivity are associated with increased levels of obesity. Critical role in the brain development of young children.

14 Impact of physical activity on the whole child Cognitive ‘thinking’ Creativity and discovery Problem solving skills Good listening skills Enhanced memory skills

15 Impact of physical activity on the whole child Physical development Stamina Strength Mobility Motor skills

16 Impact of physical activity on the whole child Personal, social and emotional outcomes Fair play Co-operation Language and communication Confidence Optimism Resilience Sense of self belief Behavioural flexibility

17 Key messages: Early years 1 Frequency: daily Intensity: no specific intensity Time: at least 3 hours Type: physically active play

18 References 1.Department of Health. Start Active, Stay Active – A report on physical activity for health from the four home countries’ Chief Medical Officers. London: Department of Health; Chaput J, Klingenberg L, Rosenkilde M, Gilbert J, Tremblay A, Sjodin A. Physical activity plays an important role in body weight regulation. J Obes. 2011;2011(Article ID ). 3.Monasta L, Batty GD, Cattaneo A, Lutje V, Ronfani L, van Lenthe FJ, et al. Early-life determinants of overweight and obesity: A review of systematic reviews. Obes Rev. 2010;11(10): OECD (2007). Understanding the brain: the birth of a learning science. OECD ISBN Rudolf M. Tackling obesity through the healthy child programme: a framework for action. National Obesity Observatory; Hinkley T, Crawford D, Salmon J, Okely AD, Hesketh K. Preschool Children and Physical Activity: A Review of Correlates. Am J Prev Med 2008 May;34(5): De Craemer M, De Decker E, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Vereecken C, Deforche, B, Manois Y, Cardon G, on behalf of the ToyBox-study group. Correlates of energy balance-related behaviours in preschool children: a systematic review. Obesity reviews 2012;13 Suppl 1: Okely AD, Salmon J, Trost SG, Hinkley T. Discussion paper for the development of physical activity recommendations for children under five years. Canberra, ACT, Australia; Australian Department of Health and Ageing, Government of Australia; Ridgers ND, Fairclough SJ, Stratton G. Variables associated with children's physical activity levels during recess: the A-CLASS project. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 2010, 7:74.

19 References 10.Health and Social Care Information Centre. Health Survey for England Volume 1: Chapter 3 - Physical activity in children. Health and Social Care Information Centre: Leeds; Reilly JJ, Okely AD, Almond L et al. Making the Case for UK Physical Activity Guidelines for Early Years: Recommendations and draft summary statements based on the current evidence. Working paper The Health and Social Care Information Centre, Lifestyles Statistics. National Child Measurement Programme: England, 2012/13 school year. Leeds: NHS Information Centre; Okely AD, Salmon J, Trost SG, Hinkley T. Discussion paper for the development of physical activity recommendations for children under five years. Canberra: Department of Health and Ageing, Government of Australia; Timmons BW, Naylor P, Pfeiffer KA. Physical activity for preschool children: How much and how? Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 32, 122–134; Department for Children, Schools and Families. Statutory Framework for the Early Years foundation Stage - Setting the Standards for Learning, Development and Care for children from birth to five. Nottingham: Department for Children, Schools and Families; Northern Ireland Council for Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment. Understanding the Foundation Stage. Belfast: Early Years Interboard Group; Wales Assembly Government. Framework for Children’s Learning for 3-7-year-olds in Wales. Cardiff: Wales Assembly Government; Allen G. Early Intervention: the Next Steps, An Independent Report to her Majesty’s Government. London: HM Government; 2011.


Download ppt "The UK physical activity guidelines for early years and the benefits of physical activity for this age group."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google