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Factory Automation Overview

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Presentation on theme: "Factory Automation Overview"— Presentation transcript:

1 Factory Automation Overview
Transcript: HAROLD JOSEPH: So today, we're here to talk about factory automation. July 2009 National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

2 Panelists Harold Joseph Alex Tan Sr. Marketing Manager
Product Marketing Manager Transcript: My name's Harold Joseph and this is Alex Tan. ALEX TAN: Hello. HAROLD JOSEPH: And we're going to cover the campaign we have rolling out now over the summer that looks at very specific areas of factory automation and the kind of products we have to address those. So with that, let's get started into the presentation. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

3 Objectives Understand National’s Factory Automation Campaign
Review National products that are used in Factory Automation Gain better understanding of the solution needs in Factory Automation and how National’s solutions and products support those application needs Transcript: So the objectives of this presentation is to give you an understanding of our factory automation campaign, what we're planning to do over the summer, and also the kind of products that are used in factory automation, and also provide you with a better understanding of the solution needs in factory automation and how we address those needs. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

4 Overview Market Key trends:
Factory Automation Market > $1B total analog content. (IMS) 16 largest suppliers address < 50% of segment sales (IMS). Key trends: Drive to more energy efficient systems Expanding competitive situation world wide is driving need for increase productivity, quality and throughput (need better / finer control) Increased diagnostics to reduce maintenance and down time Increase adoption of wireless for non critical applications ( : Hart, Zigbee, WISA,) Transcript: So the market is over a $1 billion analog market, so it's just huge, and the 16 largest suppliers address less than 50% of the segment sales. So that means everything is spread out quite a bit and there's many different kinds of applications and needs. So one of our efforts has been to try to focus down on the ones that are meaningful for us where we can bring the most value. We see a number of key trends driving the market. We see a real drive for more energy efficient systems. The cost of energy is a major factor in factory floors and in process control applications. We also see a competitive situation that's driving the need for increased productivity, quality and throughput, and that's on a worldwide basis. So as things become more competitive worldwide, there's a real drive for better or finer control. ALEX TAN: And that, I think, Harold, that's a part that we're really focused on especially for the control network sections and the machine vision sections I'll be talking about later. HAROLD JOSEPH: Okay, yes and some of the areas that I'm looking at as well, like in some of the sensing and measurement products, we're seeing an increase in nodes and requirements for those areas as people want to do more monitoring and measuring. We're also seeing an increase in diagnostics to reduce maintenance and downtime, and I'm seeing that in products where people are making more measurements. And I think on your side, on your PHY series, that's been a major function of the PHY product line that we're... ALEX TAN: That's right. We've seen a lot of traction. We've been improving not only the capabilities of the diagnostics, but the availability of diagnostics. HAROLD JOSEPH: And then we're also seeing an increased adoption in wireless for non-critical applications. And where that comes in is primarily in the factory automation area on safety areas where they're adding in sensing and measurement and functions for safety needs. We are seeing a growth, to some extent, in some of the more process control areas. It has not picked up there as quickly as it has in some of the safety areas. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

5 Factory Automation Market
Major Industry Segments: Manufacturing Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Consumables Manufacturing Automotive Manufacturing Material Handling Process Refining Chemical Food & Beverage Pulp and Paper Nationals Focus Areas DCS (Distributed Control Systems) PLCs (programmable controller and I/O modules) CNC (computer numerical control) Embedded computer board Sensors / Measurement Equipment Motor control Motion control Machine vision Transcript: So we've also identified some key areas that we're looking at in terms of industries and focuses. So on the industry side, pharmaceutical manufacturing, consumable manufacturing like food, soap, detergent, automotive manufacturing, robotic control that's big for both of our areas. Also material handling, semiconductor processing. And then in the process area, traditional process locations like refinery, chemical plants, some of the food and beverage and the pulp and paper as well. ALEX TAN: So we have a play on all of those different manufacturing technologies, right? HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes, and on the right is a list of the areas where we are focused on in terms of some of the equipment, so distributed control systems, PLCs with I/O modules, an area we both work very closely in. ALEX TAN: Right, absolutely. HAROLD JOSEPH: CNC machines, embedded computer boards, sensors, motor motion control, machine vision, any particular ones that you think are of high focus in those areas. ALEX TAN: Oh, absolutely. The motor control, motion control, machine vision and sensors, I think in those areas we have some really valuable technologies that have seen a lot of traction. HAROLD JOSEPH: Okay. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

6 Industrial Factory Automation Overview
Module: Sensing 6/25/09 Module: Control Networks 7/9/09 Module: Motor Control Sensing 7/23/09 Module: I/O Module 8/20/09 Transcript: This will give you an idea of the webinars that we are going to be producing or have produced to support factory automation. So, the first webinar that was out was the sensing module. That was on 06/25. Then you did a control networks module on 07/09. ALEX TAN: That's right. HAROLD JOSEPH: I've got a module on motor control coming out shortly, followed by the I/O module, and then finally machine vision. Is that going to be yourself or, I guess one of the other folks -- ALEX TAN: Yes, another person, right. That's right. Module: Machine Vision TBD National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

7 Automation Control Networks in Factory Automation
Transcript: HAROLD JOSEPH: So, now Alex, your specific area of interest is the automation control networks, is that correct? So I will turn it over to you at this point. ALEX TAN: Thanks Harold. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

8 Control Network Trends and Challenges
What is the challenge? More products at a faster rate and with higher quality Trend to use Ethernet based control network Replaces RS-485 or proprietary bus Trend to synchronize devices on a factory network Synchronization provides High speed sort and diverter Motion position and velocity control for coordinated drives and robotics Transcript: So, in the automation control network, what we're really talking about is the overall network that's used to control the different stations inside of a factory floor or all these different manufacturing environments like Harold mentioned earlier. And in these environments, the real challenge is to produce more products at a faster rate and with a higher quality. And what that's done to the networks is that's pushed the trend to use Ethernet-based control networks. So with an Ethernet-based control, it would replace RS-45 or proprietary bus with something that's both more robust, more, I suppose, more used overall, and really gives higher data rates. The challenge with using Ethernet is that it wasn't really designed for a factory setting or an industrial network where synchronization and latency and control are very important. It's not really a control network technology. So, the next step is synchronization. And by synchronizing the factory floor, you get the ability to have high speed for, say, sort and diverters. Or you could look at more accurate motion position and velocity control for coordinated drives and robotics. And in the next slide, I'm going to talk a little bit about one specific application. HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes, but just so that I understand, so you're saying that .issue about synchronization, that ability to provide better timing control is what really has made a difference in control on the factory floor, and that's what you bring in this product family. ALEX TAN: That's right, yes. Author’s Original Notes: This application is an example of factory automation on the factory floor. Factory automation systems are constantly challenged to produce more products at a faster rate and with higher quality. A manufacturing plants ability to operate faster depends on how precisely the system can control the various components involved in the manufacturing process. {Read the slide} The pictures on the right show two different factory automation applications that require synchronization. The top picture shows multiple robotic arms working in three dimensions to build a car. The bottom picture shows a high speed conveyor belt with a sorter and diverter. Note: RS-485 is a two wire, half duplex, multipoint serial connection that is commonly used in industrial applications. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

9 Automation Control Network Example
System sorts defective parts off of a conveyor belt Network uses fieldbus protocols on a 10/100 Ethernet network with IEEE time synchronization support HMI GPS Time Industrial Camera Bad product Pick and place S M Good product Transcript: So here's an example of a factory floor system. In this case, this factory floor system is a pick and place machine, and the square or the rectangular section in the middle is a conveyor belt that has product that's moving along it, and there's a number of different interfaces that connect to it. So on the upper left, you have the human machine interface that is used to control the system. Also, you've got a GPS timing source that provides the time synchronization master for the system. Inside of the conveyor, or inside of the system, you have a bunch of different components that actually have a lot of National parts beyond, say, just the control network, and that includes the drive controller, right? And you've got distributed I/O, you have a motion controller, and these are all driving different various components in that conveyor belt system. In this system, also there is a industrial camera, a machine vision camera that's looking at the parts as they go through, and determining if they meet the quality standards. And then there's a robotic arm that's then taking those parts, and in this case, either putting it into the garbage or moving it on to the next stage for a good product. And really, the key takeaway here is that, by synchronizing all of these components, you end up with a system that's both faster and higher quality. Author’s Original Notes: Many applications in factory automation, instrumentation and other industrial Ethernet systems require real-time synchronization of remote nodes in a distributed network. This example shows a high speed conveyor belt with a pick and place device to sort out defective parts. The pick and place machine picks up products off of a conveyor belt and puts them in packaging if they are okay and discards them if they are defective. The system is controlled by the operator through the Human Machine Interface module (HMI) in the upper left. Parts move along the conveyor belt driven by the drive controllers along the bottom. In the middle, the system determines if there is any defects in the product by examining it with the optical camera connected to the distributed I/O. On the right, the pick and place arm is controlled by the motion controller. In a traditional system running scan or event based control, the speed of the conveyor belt is limited by the amount of time it takes for the system to receive the input signals that identify defective parts and the amount of jitter it will take to control the movement of the pick and place device to remove the defective part. {click} When IEEE 1588 PTP is applied to the system, any jitter from the input and the control elements of the system is removed, so the belt can be speeded up to the fastest speed that the system can operate. IEEE 1588 PTP in this system is shown by the addition of a master clock source and IEEE 1588 PTP hardware added to each node of the network. This is indicated by the addition of the blue circles at each device. The circle with the “m” is the IEEE 1588 PTP master, that serves the time to the system. The circles with the “s” are IEEE 1588 PTP slaves that adjust their local time to match the time communicated by the master. Motion Controller S S S Drive Controller Distributed I/O Motion Controller Ethernet Switch National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

10 PHYTER® Family of Industrial Ethernet Single / Dual Port 10/100 Ethernet PHY
Basic Application Requirements Key Features Supported in the Product Family Family Speed interface Temp Support IEEE 1588 Single Port 10/100 MII/RMII Commercial Industrial Extreme NO Commercial, Industrial, and Extreme Temp Support Low Latency JTAG Support Auto-MDIX Dual Port (2) 10/100 (2) MII/RMII Flexible Port Management Cable Health Diagnostics Fiber Support YES Time Sync up to 3.5 ns on single link High Precision Packet Timestamping Transcript: So let me talk a little bit about the Ethernet family of industrial PHYTERs that we have that are designed for the industrial control network environment. So these are single and dual port 10/100 Ethernet PHYs. The first family is the single port family, and that's the DP83848 family of parts, and that supports 10 and 100 megabits per second in MII and RMII, and we support commercial, industrial and extreme, and extreme is something that's unique to National. And this doesn't have IEEE 1588s support built into it, but it does have low latency JTAG support, Auto-MDIX. These are all key features that are needed on the industrial floor. HAROLD JOSEPH: So is extreme an issue of temperature or is it an issue of performance and connectivity? ALEX TAN: So, the extreme is driven by temperature. So it's for an extreme range of temperature. But it also is for our most robust solution for very difficult or challenging environments for the parts. HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes. ALEX TAN: The dual port has two 10/100 ports on each device. These come in both commercial and industrial temperature. They also offer something that we call flexible port management. The flexible port management allows you to configure data that's going through those different ports in a variety of different paths depending on your application. This could allow daisy chaining and other more advanced features in your network. Additionally, with the dual port PHYs, we present our advanced cable health diagnostics. These are diagnostics that go beyond just the, at a failure PHY the default, but actually monitor the system as it's running so that it could provide real time updates on the quality of the link that will allow industrial floor managers to schedule predictive maintenance on links that are going bad instead of waiting to have to respond to a lines down situation. That advanced diagnostics is carried into our new family of parts, the IEEE 1588 parts. These parts are 10/100, starting with a single port PHY. It's industrial temperature, but it has built in hardware support for the IEEE 1588 PTP protocol. And that is the protocol that's being used on the industrial floor to provide synchronization between nodes. And when the viewers go on to watch the other webinars, the webinar that I have on control networks talks a great deal about it, both how the synchronization works, and why people use it inside of these types of networks. So I think the next section we have is the sensing solutions. Author’s Original Notes: Single Port PHYs include the DP83848 family of Ethernet PHYs Dual Port PHYs include the DP83849 family of Ethernet PHYs IEEE 1588 is the DP83640 Precision PHYTER® National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

11 Sensing Solutions in Factory Automation
Transcript: HAROLD JOSEPH: Oh, okay, thank you Alex. So we've looked at sensing solutions a little bit differently. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

12 Trends Expanding competitive situation world wide is driving need for increase need for better / finer control Increased measurement / sensing nodes Move to higher performance “Smarter” transducers Portable applications are growing, driving the need for lower power more energy efficient sensors and measurement systems Increased need in system diagnostics to reduce maintenance driving the need for more process measurement Transcript: We've gone ahead and looked at what are the most common sensors on the factory floor, and we've looked at some of the trends there. And what we're seeing with those sensors is that, first of all, we are seeing this drive for better or finer control. So we're seeing an increase in the types of sensing nodes and measurements nodes that are being done on the factory floor in the process control industry. So they're still looking at the same kinds of sensing, but we're seeing more of them. We're seeing the move to smarter transducers where people are looking at taking a sensing element, adding what they call "smarts" to it to do better calibration over, say a wider temperature range, or a better response to signals. They're also looking at putting in diagnostics in the devices to provide and get into some of these maintenance issues. We're seeing a rise in portable applications as well, and there's a big need there to lower the overall energy of the systems, trying to make them work on, say, smaller, lower voltage batteries, lower power batteries, and also to last longer. And then we're seeing an increased need in system diagnostics, and I mentioned the maintenance on the sensor, but we're seeing this over the whole factory floor. So we're seeing that effort here. You mentioned it on some of your industrial PHY products as well. And we're seeing a real focus to, say, one of the most costly issues that we're finding is this issue about the maintenance cost to go out and repair and take things and to keep things up and running so they get better throughput. ALEX TAN: And that's a situation that needs to be solved at every level of the network all the way from your sensors, all the way through into the control network itself, right? HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

13 Challenges / Solutions
Solutions must cover a wide range of sensing parameters National’s Op Amp / ADC solutions address complete classes of applications (e.g. virtually all pressure sensor MEMS applications) Pin and function compatible product families allow customers to standardize board layouts Growth in portable applications is driving the need for lower energy consumption solutions National has some of the lowest power Op Amps and ADC in the market. All ADCs have a very efficient power down feature. Customer has limited design resources to determine a solution and validate their design Webench Sensor Designer® generates signal path solutions based on a sensor’s specifications and parameters Transcript: So when we look at sensors, one of the issues we find is that we will take and look at a sensor, and sensor is you could take a typical device like a pressure sensor which we're going to go through as an example today, and customers will look at a variety of different pressure sensors, and they want a solution that addresses a very wide range of applications. So our product of op amps, or our family of op amps A/Ds really address a very wide range of applications. And in the case of pressure sensors, which we'll be talking about today, it addresses virtually all of the pressure sensor applications that we see. MEMS is a big area in this pressure sensor area. So we've got some standard configurations that we've developed for this. We also have developed pin and functional compatible families, so even if there is a change in, say, a particular A/D because of a performance issue, a customer can do a standard board layout and just put in the parts that they need. I mentioned the issue in portable applications, so we're seeing a drive for lower power op amps. We've just released one of the lowest power op amp on the market. Our ADCs all have power down features so they're very efficient. So very low power devices, and our signal path solutions are among the lowest in the industry, regardless and it involves a whole range of different products to address those solutions. ALEX TAN: It does include industrial portable. HAROLD JOSEPH: Industrial portable, like a portable calibrator, for example or something like this. You know, you've got the same issues on battery power with those that we have with iPods. Maybe a little bit of bigger battery pack, but that same basic issue. You don't want the battery that when -- ALEX TAN: The interface isn't quite as cool, but -- HAROLD JOSEPH: That's true yes. ALEX TAN: Right. HAROLD JOSEPH: Also, customer has limited design resources, so we've been working on some of our tools and have recently released a Webench Sensor Designer that starts with a customer's sensor, looks at the performance aspects in terms of how the sensor talks about performance aspects, and then generates a solution compatible with that. So if you're talking about accuracy or linearity on a pressure sensor, we provide that same information with a signal path, give somebody a solution guaranteed to work with access to a board to check it out. ALEX TAN: So that really simplifies and speeds up that design, right? HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes, absolutely. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

14 Sensors Interface Solutions
Focus Areas Sensors Interface Solutions 4-20mA Voltage output Signal path (SPI, I2C) Key Sensing Areas Pressure Temperature (Thermocouple, RTD) Optical Chemical pH Transcript: So, I'll quickly go through the areas we're going to be covering in the online presentation that's available now. We've looked at interface solutions for 4-20 milliamps, voltage output, A/D and amplifier signal path solution with an SPI, I2C interface. The key sensing areas we've looked at are pressure, temperature, optical, chemical and pH. These are the most common areas on the factory floor. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

15 Sensing Solutions in Factory Automation example: Pressure
Voltage Drive Current Drive or Product Selection LMP7715/7716 and ADC121S021 for the signal path is a good starting point . LMP7702 is good for the cc drive Supports most popular performance ranges Alternatives ADC based choice based on signal path performance 8 bit ADC is ±0.4% 10 bit ADC is ±0.10% 12 bit ADC is ±0.024% Transcript: And as an example of our approach, I've put in a pressure sensor. So you've got a block diagram on the right. It shows an instrumentation amplifier configuration and an ADC with a bridge sensor. And these bridges are typically driven either voltage or constant current, very common, defined with pressure sensor, anywhere from a 3K to a 6K bridge. You also have anywhere from 30 millivolts to 100 millivolt output. So you've got a configuration that we can address with just a limited number of products. A good starting point for us is the 7715 to 16 with an ADC 121 S101 that will address the majority of the signal path applications. We would typically use something like an LMP 7702 for the constant current drive of the device or a single amplifier for constant voltage. And when we look at the applications, we look at A/Ds in terms of performance and op amps in terms of areas like bandwidth, noise, offset and power. Opamps can be chosen to optimize signal path for a variety of applications Higher Bandwidth Low Noise Low Input Offset Voltage Low Power National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

16 Recommended Products Recommended ADCs Recommended Opamps Transcript:
And we will go through this kind of presentation for each of the sensors and then give you a list of the products that we would recommend for those applications. So we're trying to narrow down the list to say here's the discrete list of products that we would look at to address those particular kinds of areas. And typically, one set, like the 7715/16 with one of the A/Ds might address all of the sensors made from one manufacturer. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

17 Machine Vision in Factory Automation
Transcript: Now is, next area's machine vision, and that's over to you, again. ALEX TAN: That's right. So machine vision is in the high speed data path group. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

18 Machine Vision Trends and Challenges
What is the challenge? Inspect products at higher speeds and with more detail Trend to use high resolution and fine resolution image systems Trend to support high bandwidth cameras using SerDes devices SerDes devices provide Support for higher bandwidth image transfer without software support Smaller cables for improved robustness Small form-factor to support nano- head camera form factor Transcript: And really, National has been playing in the machine vision space for a long time. We've got our Channel Link SerDes products that have been a de facto standard for the machine vision products. But going forward, what is the challenge? The challenge in machine vision is to inspect products at higher speeds and with more detail. So the trend is to use this high resolution and fine resolution image systems to be able to detect the details of a product as it's going past, and also to do it faster. So that means that you have to support high bandwidth cameras, often using SerDes devices, and that the resolutions that you use are not necessarily your standard video resolutions. You know, a video resolution might be a 780 x 400 or something like that, but in this case, they would use these nonstandard resolutions like. So the SerDes devices also provide support for the higher bandwidth without any software. So it's a very simple connection. It basically acts like a data pump. Also, a SerDes connection allows smaller cables that give you improved robustness and allow your, say, your mechanical assembly to move faster or with lower power motors. So you said it doesn't use any software, just pumps the data. And that's always been, I understood, the limitation with a lot of these systems is the software side. Is that correct? ALEX TAN: That's right, because if you have to have a software driver, you have to have software support. That means that you've been framing data inside of your, say, a PGA or a micro-controller. That adds a lot of burden to the system as opposed to just a camera directly to a SerDes, then ship the data over to a frame grabber that'll do the analysis. HAROLD JOSEPH: I see. ALEX TAN: And also, the SerDes provide a small form factor to support nanohead camera and other smaller devices. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

19 Machine Vision Imaging Example
Key Requirements : High resolution, Multi-lane, Longer reach Display Sensing Unit Processing Unit Data Path LNA AFE Ser/ Des Sensor FPGA Ser/ Des FPGA Control Transcript: Here's an example of a machine vision system. In this case, the key requirements here are things like high resolution that would have a multi-lane, so multiple video channels, and longer reach. And you have a sensing unit that has a sensor. In this case, we're talking about like a CCD sensor, a CMOS imager, and going through an FPGA that's connected directly to the SerDes. And then, like I said that's a data pump that goes right to the processing unit. And from there, it'll go to a display or go to a control or go to storage, or potentially all three but inside of a factory automation system. HAROLD JOSEPH: And you're working pretty closely with the FPGA manufacturers, because I understand that they're also trying to drive to get down to a lower cost systems right now, and you're working on developing solutions with them so you can put this all through the factory floor. ALEX TAN: That's right. We're working very closely with the FPGA manufacturers. Author’s Original Notes: One of the most common uses of machine vision in industrial systems is to provide automated inspection capabilities on the factory floor. These systesm are often separated into two component, a sensing unit and a processing unit. Control Path Control Network Storage National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

20 Industrial Imaging Interface Portfolio : Plug-and-Go! Devices
Basic Application Requirement Other System Requirements Family Data Throughput Max Cable Reach* Data Type FPGA-Link 1.25 to Gbps 40m of Gbps 20m of Gbps ANY Redundancy & Daisy chaining FPGA friendly, LVDS parallel interface Low system BOM, design time FPD-Link 2 120 to Mbps 4m to 8m of 2 Gbps 10/16/18/24/32 bit data interface Lock to random data, low EMI FPGA/ASIC as logic interconnect Channel Link (Camera- Link) 500 to Mbps 4m to 8m of MDR cable at 2.5 Gbps 21/28/48 wide bus interface Transcript: Also, from the standpoint of the product families, the new product families, the first one is the FPGA-Link product that goes from 1.25 gigabits per second to gigabits per second, and can go a maximum reach of 40 meters on a CAT-6 at 1.25 gigabits per second. If you run at a higher bandwidth, of course, it goes a shorter distance to 20 meters. But these systems are redundant, they support daisy chaining, they're FPGA-friendly. They have an LVDS and parallel interface. And, so it provides a lower system BOM and quick design time. The next family is the FPD-Link 2 family, and that's 120 to 2700 megabits per second, and that's 4 meters to 8 meters of CAT-6 at that 2 gigabit per second speed. And this provides a larger data bit interface from 10 bits all the way up to 32-bit data, depending on the family, and it will lock to random data. It has a low EMI and connects directly with the FPGA or ASIC as we were talking about working very closely. The older product family that is being used in a number of machine vision systems today is the Channel Link family, and that is also called Camera Link. For those systems, it's 500 to 5,000 megabits per second, and the distance you get for those is from 4 meters to 8 meters, and that supports a bus from 21 bits to 48 bits. And one important thing to see there is that these systems allow you to have plug-and-go seamless video. So on the bottom of your screen, you'll see the headers. Using the SerDes, you can remove those headers and have all of your bandwidth going towards data. HAROLD JOSEPH: Now there was a demo that was done. I think it's part of like a podcast or whatever, right? And did it address one of these particular products? ALEX TAN: That's right. It was on the FPGA Link family of products. HAROLD JOSEPH: Okay, and that was an actual demo and that's online too. That was done as part of our newsletter I think. ALEX TAN: Yes, absolutely. HAROLD JOSEPH: Okay. Author’s Original Notes: FPGA-Link : DS32EL0421/0124, DS32ELX0421/0124 FPD-Link 2 : DS90UR241/124, DS92LV3241/42*, DS92LV2421/2421* Channel-Link : DS90CR285/286, DS90CR287/288 * Cable length is for reference only, various system conditions impact the maximum reach National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

21 Motor Control Sensing in Factory Automation
Transcript: ALEX TAN: Okay, now I think it's back to you Harold with the motor control. HAROLD JOSEPH: Okay, so this is a specific area on the factory floor where you see a lot of different requirements, National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

22 Trends, Challenges / Solutions
Increasing energy costs driving the need to reduce energy consumption on the factory floor Instrumentation of motors to improve energy efficiency (Motors are one of the largest energy consumers on the factory floor) Drive to lower cost AC/Servo motor control sensing solutions Hall effect + SAR ADC versus optically isolated ΣΔ ADCs Challenges / Solutions Need for high performance, high value AC/ Servo Motor solutions National’s Simul. Sampling ADCs + Hall Effect sensors address the most popular “High Side” AC Motor sensing applications National’s Simul. Sampling ADCs are in very small packages with sample rates up to 1Msps  ideal for encoder applications Transcript: particularly concerns about driving things like robotic arms and motion control, all kinds of motors. Motors are used throughout the factory floor. The biggest issue we see with motors is an increasing need to conserve energy cost. If you actually look at the lifetime cost of a motor, more than 99% of the lifetime cost of that motor is the energy the motor consumes, not the actual hardware cost of the motor itself. And motors are one of the largest energy consumers on the factory floor. ALEX TAN: That's pretty surprising actually. You wouldn't expect that so much would go to the motors. HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes, there's even, in some regions, they're even charging factories who consume a lot of energy, they're looking at, say, having a tiered sort of cost structure where if they can bring down their cost, they can pay it less per kilowatt hour or something for the energy that they burn. And one of the issues you have with motors is that if you instrument a motor and you can control the motor torque, you can run it efficiently. If you don't have instrumentation on the motor to control it, what actually happens is that you tend to run the motor sort of full out and break it down and you consume more power. So instrumenting the motor is a big focus on reducing power. Our focus is on the high end AC and servo motor applications. These are the most critical loops. There's two approaches that are typically taken with these devices. One is to use a Hall Effects sensor and SAR ADC as the primary control loop. Another is to use an optically isolated sigma-delta approach. So, the reason for this is that, on these big AC and servo motors, you're talking about a very high common mode voltage. And so you got to have some way of isolating our analog components from that high voltage. Our focus in our webinar is going to be on the Hall effect and SAR. That's our best solution for the application. So we talk about those kinds of applications. So the focus in the webinar that you will be able to see online very shortly is really on two areas, the AC motors where we're looking at an ADC and a Hall effect sensor to focus on the primary signal path solution to control the motor, and then also that same ADC used as part of a servo motor. So a servo motor is an AC motor with an encoder or resolver on it. So you're actually doing a little bit finer control, but it needs some additional measurement. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

23 Why is Motor Control Sensing Important AC Motors Sensing Interface
Focus Areas Why is Motor Control Sensing Important AC Motors Sensing Interface Servo Motors Sensing Interface Low Side Sensing High Speed Motor Synchronization Transcript: So in that presentation, the webinar, we talked about why motor control sensing is important, we took a look at AC motor sensing, servo motor sensing. We looked at something called low side sensing, lower cost approach, and we also looked at high speed motor synchronization, looking at some of your PHY products to control multiple motors. ALEX TAN: Sure, absolutely. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

24 Motor Control Sensing Example: Servo Motor Control Sensing
Servo drives are AC drives with the addition of an encoder or resolver to provide finer control. Encoders provide better performance than resolvers, however a resolver can be used over a wider temperature range and can tolerate higher shock and vibration. The encoder may provide voltage output directly to an ADC or there may be an Op Amp in front of the ADC Transcript: HAROLD JOSEPH: So this is an example of the slide from the presentation, and this focuses on the AC or the servo motor side. So in this area, you've got a blue arrow identifying an ADC and an op amp that would be needed to measure an encoder or a resolver. And an encoder would be either magnetic or optical encoder that they're very accurate. The term I use in resolver is sort of a winding approach. It's more robust, it's not as accurate, it can tolerate higher temperatures, so both are used in servo motor applications. And then we will go through and identify the op amps and A/Ds required for those applications. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

25 Recommended Products Op Amps Simultaneous Sampling Differential ADCs
Transcript: And as with sensors, we would give you a selection of the products. The diagrams would give you the best alternative when you look at the diagram on the previous page, but this would then give you the products that we would recommend for AC and servo motor applications and some of their major specifications. ALEX TAN: So we have a set of products then that's fit for these applications. HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes, absolutely. In fact, in the center you have the simultaneous sampling ADCs. So one of the issues we get into in the webinar is that when you do this high side measurement, the phase relationship between the three phases of the AC current that drives the motor are very important. You have to either measure them individually or you can measure two phases simultaneously and then calculate the third. And so, typically, the standard approach would be is to do what's called a simultaneous sampling ADC where you make both measurements on those lines at exactly the same time. ALEX TAN: Oh, okay, great. References National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

26 Data Acquisition in Factory Automation
Transcript: HAROLD JOSEPH: So the next area is data acquisition and factory automation. So this takes those inputs from the motors, the machine division, the sensors, brings them back to a data acquisition area, and then through your control networks, then moves it on up to the final control room. So this gives us then the whole overview of the factory floor and how we tie things together. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

27 Trends, Challenges / Solutions
Expanding competitive situation world wide is driving need for increase need for better / finer control Increase in distributed control Increased need in system diagnostics to reduce maintenance and production costs Challenges / Solutions Solutions need to cover a wide range of IO module parameters, features and specifications National’s Op Amp / ADC solutions provide both integrated and discrete solutions to allow customers to develop a solution that meets their specific needs Transcript: So in data acquisition, we are again seeing this drive or need for better, finer control. And in terms of data acquisition, what that means is we're seeing more distributed controls, so I/O modules being moved out onto the factory floor closer to the measurement points. And then that changes some of the issues about how long lines have to be run and how we do those applications. ALEX TAN: Because it's distributed, they have more flexibility. HAROLD JOSEPH: Well they have more flexibility, but it also means that you're doing more measurement points oftentimes in an area. You might not have the issues about maybe noise, about sending signals longer distances as much, but you have other issues that you have to address as well, so - ALEX TAN: Okay, well tradeoffs. HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes. So we're also seeing the increased need for systems diagnostics to reduce the maintenance downtime. And in terms of the solutions, we're looking at National's op amps and ADC solutions where we would provide both integrated and discrete solutions to allow customers to develop their own solution for their specific requirement. So most of our applications right now are discrete solutions, but we are combining them into integrated solutions that we're going to be bringing out over the next year or so. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

28 Focus Areas IO Module (Input) IO Module (Output)
Data Acquisition - Single Channel Data Acquisition - Multi-Channel Transcript: In the focus areas, we look at an IO module, both the input side, gathering those sensor inputs, and the output side, control, so opening up a valve, controlling some process or flow. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

29 Data Acquisition in Factory Automation Example: Data Acquisition
Single channel and multi-channel data acquisition Microcontroller LM35 Thermocouple + V R G 1 F - Metal A Metal B C 2 A 3 Reference Junction ADC Bridge Sensor REF DIFF _ Av =( / ) CM = AMP IN OUT SPI Port 16 bit Diff ADC 4-20mA Current Loop 10 W 470 pF 180 100 nF LMP 8601 LM34 Transcript: We're looking at data acquisition in terms of single channel and multi-channel, and I've got a diagram that illustrates that. Now one of the areas I mentioned in terms of tradeoffs is that when you start looking at remote versus local, you have an issue about isolation. Because when you're in a remote location, you might have a measurement being done and you might shift that signal maybe a thousand feet somewhere. Well those ground potentials are at different levels, so you would have a requirement in your data acquisition system where you'd be looking at single channel, and then you would isolate digitally the output of that ADC before it goes into the micro controller. So sometimes, customers are looking for single channel solutions. Other times, if everything's close together, they can actually use an ADC with a MUX. And the bottom block shows an ADC where you've got a MUX and you've tied in a variety of different inputs, a thermocouple in LM35 which is one of our temp sensors, or a 4 to 20 milliamp loop, which is a kind of a way to send signals around the factory floor. ALEX TAN: But you're doing that all with one ADC. HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes, so with the MUX version. So we need both to address the applications. ALEX TAN: Great. And then, from the control network side, the data that's captured here would then be sent off of, say, an Ethernet control network that would then take it out to the rest of the system, right? HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes. ALEX TAN: Okay. HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes, and so a lot of these issues, we face the same kind of concerns you have with sensors. Do you have a product that addresses a wide range? What's the performance requirement? National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

30 Recommended Products Op Amps Single Ended Input ADCs Temperature
Transcript: And so, as part of the presentation, we then go through the particular products that we need and why they're important. And here we listed as a sample some of the op amps that you would use in this application, some of the single-ended ADCs that we have. We also have some differential products as well as some temperature products. Temperature National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

31 Recommended Products Differential Input ADCs References DACS
Transcript: And, I'm sorry, differential products on the second page here with references and DACS. So that presentation, which will be out in about a month or so covers a number of different modules, and then we'll show you the different product configurations. ALEX TAN: Excellent. Okay, yes. DACS National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

32 Summary National’s product line supports a wide range of Factory Automation applications Webinars on Control Networks, Sensing, Motor Control, Machine Vision and I/O modules will be available as part of the Industrial Campaign Webinars provide solutions for sensing, I/O controls, motion controllers, automation control networks and machine vision applications. Does the material provided address your application concerns? If not let us know. Transcript: HAROLD JOSEPH: So, over to you. ALEX TAN: So thank you very much for listening through this. This is just intended to provide an overview, give you a high level understanding of how these products fit together and what National's play is in the industrial space. So, the summary here is that the National product line supports a wide range of the factory automation applications. We talked specifically about webinars on control networks, sensing, motor control and machine vision and I/O modules. Then, these webinars provide solutions that'll give you more information on how to use these products for the specific applications. Also, if the material provided, if you have any comments or feedback on the material provided, we're always very interested in hearing that. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

33 Factory Automation Webinars
Sensing Solutions in Factory Automation 6/24/09 Control Networks /9/09 Motor Control Sensing 7/23/09 I/O Module /20/09 Machine Vision TBD Transcript: And here's the dates for the factory automation webinars that are coming through. HAROLD JOSEPH: So you've already done the control networks, sensing is out, motor control is out. So by the time they see this, those three should be online, I think. ALEX TAN: That's right. And then, following with I/O module and then the machine vision following that, it's still TBD. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

34 For Additional Information
Released webinars in this series can be viewed at: Powerwise® Design University Factory Automation signal path solutions can be found on Nationals technical and application support web sites SIGNAL PATH Solutions SIGNAL PATH Designer Technology Edge Webench Sensor Designer® Tools Transcript: And for more information, you could find these webinars at the URL that's listed on this page. Additionally, there are a number of different landing pages that you can go to for more information about the products that we already discussed today. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

35 Contact Information Harold Joseph Sr. Marketing Manager (408) Alex Tan Product Marketing Manager (408) Transcript: And also, here's our contact information. If you have any questions, please feel free to address us directly. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott

36 Transcript: Thank you very much and we really appreciate your time and hope that this has been useful for you. HAROLD JOSEPH: Yes, thank you. We've enjoyed it and I hope you have, too. National 3.0 Conference Alex Chin, Harold Joseph, Dave Lewis, Wanda Garrett, Ken Filliter, Sanjay Gajendra, Cornel Pazara, Kristen Elserougi, Stephen Ott


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