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School, Family and Community Partnerships Developing, Implementing, Evaluating and Revising Northwest Service Cooperative June 22, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "School, Family and Community Partnerships Developing, Implementing, Evaluating and Revising Northwest Service Cooperative June 22, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

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2 School, Family and Community Partnerships Developing, Implementing, Evaluating and Revising Northwest Service Cooperative June 22, 2011

3 Mission Statement We are dedicated to helping educators improve student learning by equipping them with research-based strategies and services that meet their needs and produce results. As leaders in our field, we strive to be the first choice of educators seeking proven, timely, accessible, and cost-effective solutions to the challenges they face. (Learning Point Associates)

4 Wake Up  Our day will begin with a brief “warm up” activity.  Work alone on the “brain- teaser” puzzle for two minutes.  How many puzzles were you able to solve?

5 Are two heads better than one?  Now, work with others at your table for two minutes.  How did working together compare with working alone on this activity?

6 School, Family and Community Partnerships The same results occur when teachers, parents, students, and others work together to develop an excellent program of school, family and community partnerships. Today, we will focus on how to plan, implement, monitor progress and increase the number of families that are involved in their children’s education.

7 Session Goals Review SIP/DIP expectations/requirements for parent involvement Examine ways to translate the research base for building effective school, family and community partnerships to action using Epstein’s Framework of Six Types of Involvement Review and summarize results of your Partnership Inventory Develop an Action Plan for “next steps” in building your research-based partnership program

8 Why evaluate? When activities are evaluated, outreach to families should increase, and the quality of the partnership program should improve from year to year. Helps shift interactions with families from “accidental and peripheral” to well-planned and intentional Evaluation is not viewed solely as or measured only by “bodies in the building.”

9 SIP: Evaluating Parent Involvement SIP Element 6: 6. Promote effective parent involvement strategies Include strategies to promote effective parental involvement in the school a) Identify research-based or best practice strategies used to increase parent involvement, including new efforts and enhancements to existing strategies. b) Explain how these effective parent involvement strategies will contribute to improved student learning in the specifically cited area(s). c) If continuing in School Choice, SES, Corrective Action, Pre- Restructuring or Restructuring, describe the process to evaluate parent involvement strategies.

10 DIP: Evaluating Parent Involvement DIP Element 6: 6. Promote effective parent involvement strategies Include strategies to promote effective parental involvement in the school a) Identify research-based or best practice strategies used to increase parent involvement, including new efforts and enhancements to existing strategies. b) Explain how these effective parent involvement strategies will contribute to improved student learning in the specifically cited area(s). c) If Continuing in Need of Improvement or Corrective Action, describe the process to evaluate parent involvement strategies.

11 Appendix B- Element 6: Describe the process to evaluate parent involvement strategies being implemented. If strategies are not effectively engaging parents, especially from identified student groups, what new research-based strategies are proposed, in cited areas?

12 SIP-DIP RUBRIC 6. Promote effective parent involvement strategies DistinguishedProficientNeeds Revision  Strategies are identified that are effective based on research and best practice and an evaluation process is evident  Strategies are identified to inform families about continuous academic progress, especially in cited area(s)  Strategies are identified that are effective based on research and best practice (and include a process for evaluation when completing Appendix B,C, D or E)  Strategies are identified and linked to improving student learning in cited area(s)  Strategies are not identified or unclear to promote effective parent involvement  Strategies are not identified or are not linked with improving learning in cited area(s)

13 Research Base “Is the National Network of Partnership Schools (NNPS) a research-based model?” The term is important for all school improvement programs and for the No Child Left Behind requirements for parental involvement. Just as educators want research-based curricular and instructional approaches, they also want family and community involvement programs to be based on solid knowledge and tested tools.

14 The answer-YES!  NNPS is research-based. NNPS's framework of six types of involvement, emphasis on teamwork, planning forms, evaluation tools, and other strategies and materials are based on the results of research conducted over twenty years by NNPS and other researchers.  NNPS research is on-going

15 14 What Research Says…. Parents vary in how much they presently are involved. Parents are concerned about their children’s success in school. Students need multiple sources of support to succeed in school and in life. Schools must reach out in order to involve all families. Some teachers and administrators are initially resistant to increasing family involvement. Teachers and administrators in schools and districts need inservice, preservice, and advanced education on partnerships. Subject-specific practices involve families in ways that directly assist students’ learning and success. Partnership programs are most effective if they are research- based, customized for each community, evaluated, and continually improved to help meet important goals for students.

16 15 Framework of Six Types of Involvement

17 Shifts in thinking…. 1.School, family and community partnerships is a better term than parental involvement. 2.School, family and community partnership is a multidimensional concept. 3.A program of school, family and community partnerships is an essential component of school and classroom organization. 4.Programs of school, family and community partnerships require multilevel leadership. 5.Programs of school, family and community partnerships must focus on increasing student learning and development. 6.All programs of school, family and community partnership are about equity.

18 Overlapping Spheres of Influence

19 18 THE KEYS TO SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL-FAMILY-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS EPSTEIN’S SIX TYPES OF INVOLVEMENT PARENTING: Assist families in understanding child and adolescent development, and in setting home conditions that support children as students at each age and grade level. Assist schools in understanding families. COMMUNICATING: Communicate with families about school programs and student progress through effective school-to-home and home-to-school communications. VOLUNTEERING: Improve recruitment, training, work, and schedules to involve families as volunteers and audiences at school or in other locations to support students and school programs. LEARNING AT HOME: Involve families with their children in learning activities at home, including homework, other curriculum- related activities, and individual course and program decisions. DECISION MAKING: Include families as participants in school decisions, governance, and advocacy through PTA/PTO, school councils, committees, action teams, and other parent organizations. COLLABORATING WITH COMMUNITY: Coordinate resources and services for students, families, and the school with businesses, agencies, and other groups, and provide services to the community. Type 1 Type 2 Type 6 Type 5 Type 4 Type 3

20 Carousel Sharing With your partner, you will initiate the creation of an informational poster about your assigned partnership key. Your poster should provide a clear understanding of the partnership key, including the challenges and “redefinitions.” Feel free to be creative! Symbols, images, etc. After you have initiated the poster, each team will rotate around the room, spending 2-3 minutes at each poster. Continue to embellish and enhance the posters as you rotate around the room. Record your ideas and thoughts about each teams’ work directly onto each poster. Pass the marker responsibility back and forth as you work around the room. When you arrive back at your own poster, read how others have responded to and enhanced your work.

21 Take a Break

22 21 Meeting the Challenges

23 Challenges & Redefinitions Most schools conduct some activities for the six types of involvement, but most schools do not reach all families, at all grade levels, in ways the are family friendly, and that produce results. Schools must work to meet challenges and reach all families in order to have a successful partnership program. “Redefinitions” are needed to look at common involvement activities in new ways.

24 Jumping Hurdles Select one person to the recorder and one person to report to the whole group. With your team, identify ONE very successful family or community involvement activity at your school/district. What challenge(s) arouse? How was the challenge solved? How would you improve the activity if it were conducted again. Used the “Jumping Hurdles” form to record your responses.

25 School, Family and Community Partnership INVENTORY Results Take about minutes to examine the results of your Partnership Inventory. Feel free to make notes, jot down your observations/thoughts.

26 Element 6-Notes Describe the process to evaluate parent involvement strategies. How are the six types of involvement presently covered or conducted at your school/district? What similarities or differences do you notice across grade levels? What activities should be implemented across grade levels, or be modified from grade to grade? Describe the role of the student in the partnership activities. How well do your partnership activities reach all families? Where are your strengths? What needs do you notice? How does your current parent involvement policy align with this framework? How might you adjust your policy to reflect the six types of involvement? What are some possible NEW action steps you might take? Other insights/observations?

27 Lunch

28 27 Reaching Results

29 Results for Students, Parents and Teachers By focusing on results, family and community involvement can contribute to the attainment of school improvement goals. Each of the six types of involvement produces different results. It is vital to link the six types of involvement to specific, desired results

30 29 For STUDENTS Higher grades and test scores Better attendance Improved behavior at home and at school Better social skills and adjustment to school More classes passed and credits earned Increased enrollment in more challenging academic programs and graduation on time

31 30 For PARENTS Stronger sense of support from school and other parents More awareness of student progress and effective responses to problems Increased self confidence about guiding student through school Appreciation of teachers’ work and skills Increased feeling of ownership of school

32 31 For TEACHERS Increased respect for families’ strengths and efforts Increased understanding of families goals for their children Greater readiness to involve all families in new ways Use of community resources to enrich students’ experiences Increased satisfaction with teaching

33 32 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EXAMPLES for a One-Year Action Plan for Partnerships to IMPROVE READING ACHIEVEMENT TYPE 1 Workshops for parents on various ways to read aloud with young children TYPE 2 Parent-teacher-student conferences on reading goals and reading progress TYPE 3 Reading-partner volunteers, guest readers of favorite stories, and other organized, ongoing read-with-me activities TYPE 4 Family Reading Night to demonstrate reading strategies for parents and grade-specific activities to conduct with students at home PTA/PTO support for a family room or parent center to provide information on children’s reading, and to conduct book swaps, make book bags for read-at-home programs, and sponsor other reading activities TYPE 5 Donations from business partners of books for classrooms, for the school library, and for children to take home TYPE 6 …AND MANY OTHER IDEAS FOR EACH TYPE OF INVOLVEMENT READING GOAL

34 33 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL EXAMPLES for a One-Year Action Plan for Partnerships to IMPROVE MATH SKILLS TYPE 1 Workshops for parents to explain new math standards and tests, and to demonstrate and discuss how math skills are taught to students TYPE 2 Articles for parents in school or class newsletters or posted on the school Web site by students and math teachers on interesting math topics and skills TYPE 3 Volunteer math tutors to assist students who need one-on-one tutoring and extra help with specific math skills TYPE 4 Weekly interactive homework assignments for students to demonstrate mastery of a math skill for family partners and to discuss how each skill is used in everyday situations PTA/PTO-sponsored Family Math Night for fun and learning TYPE 5 After-school programs funded by business and community partners to provide students with extra help and enrichment activities in math TYPE 6 …AND MANY OTHER IDEAS FOR EACH TYPE OF INVOLVEMENT MATH GOAL

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36 National Network of Partnership Schools Need ideas??? Click on “Table of Contents” to access document

37 What does a good action plan include? Student centered goal linked to cited area(s) Desired results-Specific, quantitative, and measureable Success indicators-What tools will you use to measure the desired results? (formal, and informal measures) Partnerships-How are parents, other family members or community involved?

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40 Action Plan for student success One person should record your ideas Identify ONE important academic goal for students. This goal will be directly from your SIP/DIP Plan Measurement tools-again, specific Activities-describe in detail (ie. Newsletter will include a new math skill for each grade at least one time a month vs. “newsletter.”

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42 41 Improvement or AYP Leadership Team AYP Leadership or School Improvement Team oversees the school’s ENTIRE School or District Improvement Plan (SIP/DIP). Action Team for Partnerships (ATP) guides action to increase family and community involvement by writing an annual Action Plan for Partnerships linked to SIP goals. This team meets at least monthly to discuss all programs, assess progress, and plan next steps to attain goals in the SIP/DIP. ATP meets monthly to discuss the schedule of family and community involvement activities, assess progress, and improve plans. This team hears all committee reports and assists committees in helpful ways. ATP is one committee that reports plans and progress to the School Council for advice and support. Action Team for Partnerships

43 Feedback-CEU’s Thank you for your feedback. Your comments and suggestions will be used to plan future sessions.

44 Professional Reflection (aka…Homework) Professional Reading: Why Some Parents Don’t Come to School (Finders & Lewis, 1994) AND/OR, Breaking New Ground: Data Systems Transform Family Engagement in Education (PTA, 2011) Refer to PLC Article discussion guidelines-How might you share these resources with your staff? Check out the Parent Involvement resources on the Northwest Service Cooperative site:

45 References Epstein, J. L. (2009). School, family, and community partnerships: your handbook for action (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Finders, M., & Lewis, C. (1994). Why some parents don't come to school. Educational Leadership, 51(8), Weiss, H. B., Lopez, M. E., & Stark, D. R. (2011, January). Breaking new ground: Data systems transform family engagement in education. Harvard Family Research Project. Retrieved June 21, 2011, from resources/browse-our-publications/breaking-new-ground- data-systems-transform-family-engagement-in-education2http://www.hfrp.org/publications- resources/browse-our-publications/breaking-new-ground- data-systems-transform-family-engagement-in-education2

46 Northwest Service Cooperative AYP Team Kyle Erickson Becky Smith Toni Cox


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