Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Major Lifestyle Changes: The Middle Ages to 1800.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Major Lifestyle Changes: The Middle Ages to 1800."— Presentation transcript:

1 Major Lifestyle Changes: The Middle Ages to 1800

2 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce

3 No monetary system in place.

4 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce No monetary system in place. Bartering was used exclusively.

5 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce No monetary system in place. Bartering was used exclusively. Trading what you have for what you want.

6 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce No monetary system in place. Bartering was used exclusively. Trading what you have for what you want. Manors grew what they could and bartered for the rest.

7 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce No monetary system in place. Bartering was used exclusively. Trading what you have for what you want. Manors grew what they could and bartered for the rest. This system encouraged specialization in goods.

8 1450 to 1750: Beginning of commerce No monetary system in place. Bartering was used exclusively. Trading what you have for what you want. Manors grew what they could and bartered for the rest. This system encouraged specialization in goods. Increasing profits helped to sustain the new system.

9 Change in the Wind: Farming improvements led to more food being produced.

10 Change in the Wind: Farming improvements led to more food being produced. Leads to population increases

11 Change in the Wind: Farming improvements led to more food being produced. Leads to population increases Increased market demand for cloth due to population increases.

12 Change in the Wind: Farming improvements led to more food being produced. Leads to population increases Increased market demand for cloth due to population increases. Cottage Industry: textile manufacturing in the home with all members of the family helping make cloth.

13 Change in the Wind: Farming improvements led to more food being produced. Leads to population increases Increased market demand for cloth due to population increases. Cottage Industry: textile manufacturing in the home with all members of the family helping make cloth. This leads us to the INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION.

14 Industrial Revolution

15 :

16 Industrial Revolution : the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production.

17 Industrial Revolution : the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production. Started in the textile industry.

18 Industrial Revolution : the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production. Started in the textile industry. Factory System: machines and workers brought together in large buildings.

19 Industrial Revolution : the European manufacturing process shifted from small, home production to large-scale, machine production. Started in the textile industry. Factory System: machines and workers brought together in large buildings. Division of labor: Each worker did one specific part of the process.

20 Inventions: Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry

21 Inventions: Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768

22 Inventions: Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 Water Frame: Richard Arkwright

23 Inventions: Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 Water Frame: Richard Arkwright Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793

24 Inventions: Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 Water Frame: Richard Arkwright Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 Transportation Increases

25 Inventions: Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 Water Frame: Richard Arkwright Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 Transportation Increases Better Roads

26 Inventions: Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 Water Frame: Richard Arkwright Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 Transportation Increases Better Roads Canals (human-made waterways)

27 Inventions: Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 Water Frame: Richard Arkwright Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 Transportation Increases Better Roads Canals (human-made waterways) Railroads

28 Inventions: Major Inventions Changed the Textile Industry Spinning Jenny: James Hartgrove 1768 Water Frame: Richard Arkwright Cotton Gin: Eli Whitney 1793 Transportation Increases Better Roads Canals (human-made waterways) Railroads Steam Engines: Developed by James Watt

29 Inventions: Steam engine: James Watts 1785, revolutionized factory work.

30 Powering the Industrial Revolution:

31 Started with Water Power: Machines worked due to the flow of water wheels built on rivers.

32 Powering the Industrial Revolution: Started with Water Power: Machines worked due to the flow of water wheels built on rivers. Steam engines: Steam boats by 1808 used to transport goods and people across the water much faster with larger amounts.

33 Fueling the machines:

34 Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL Fueling the machines:

35 Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL Coal mining expands: Production doubles from 1750 to Fueling the machines:

36 Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL Coal mining expands: Production doubles from 1750 to Large cities grow up near coal and iron fields. Fueling the machines:

37 Factories need fuel to run the machines: COAL Coal mining expands: Production doubles from 1750 to Large cities grow up near coal and iron fields.

38 Labor issues

39 The raw wool and cotton that fed the British textile mills came from: Labor issues

40 The raw wool and cotton that fed the British textile mills came from: Lands converted from farming to raising sheep, leaving farm workers without jobs Labor issues

41 The raw wool and cotton that fed the British textile mills came from: Lands converted from farming to raising sheep, leaving farm workers without jobs Urbanization: movement of people from rural to urban (city) areas Labor issues

42 Conditions in the cities:

43 Housing, water, sewers, food supplies, and lighting were completely inadequate. Conditions in the cities:

44 Housing, water, sewers, food supplies, and lighting were completely inadequate.  Slums grew and disease destroyed the population. Conditions in the cities:

45 Housing, water, sewers, food supplies, and lighting were completely inadequate.  Slums grew and disease destroyed the population.  Crime increased and became a way of life for those who could make a living in no other way. Conditions in the cities:

46 Conditions in the countryside:

47 The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations. Conditions in the countryside:

48 The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations. Most peasants: Conditions in the countryside:

49 The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations. Most peasants: Didn’t have enough land to support themselves Conditions in the countryside:

50 The only successful farmers were those with large landholdings who could afford agricultural innovations. Most peasants: Didn’t have enough land to support themselves Were forced to move to the cities to find work in the factories. Conditions in the countryside:

51 The role of the railroads:

52 Built during the 1830s and 1840s: The role of the railroads:

53 Built during the 1830s and 1840s: Enabled people to leave the place of their birth and migrate easily to the cities. The role of the railroads:

54 Built during the 1830s and 1840s: Enabled people to leave the place of their birth and migrate easily to the cities. Allowed cheaper and more rapid transport of raw materials and finished products. The role of the railroads:

55 Conditions in the factories:

56 All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security. Conditions in the factories:

57 All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security. In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline: Conditions in the factories:

58 All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security. In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline: The closing of factory gates to late workers Conditions in the factories:

59 All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security. In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline: The closing of factory gates to late workers Fines for tardiness Conditions in the factories:

60 All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security. In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline: The closing of factory gates to late workers Fines for tardiness Long Hours- 12 hour days Conditions in the factories:

61 All working people, however, faced possible unemployment, with little or no provision for security. In addition, they were subject to various kinds of discipline: The closing of factory gates to late workers Fines for tardiness Long Hours- 12 hour days Beatings for not doing their “best” Conditions in the factories:

62 Changes to the family:

63 Decline of cottage industries + Increase in factories = family life changed. Changes to the family:

64 Decline of cottage industries + Increase in factories = family life changed. At first, the entire family, including the children, worked in the factory, just as they had at home. Changes to the family:

65 Decline of cottage industries + Increase in factories = family life changed. At first, the entire family, including the children, worked in the factory, just as they had at home. Later, family life became fragmented (the father worked in the factory, the mother handled domestic chores, the children went to school). Changes to the family:

66 Gender roles defined:

67 This brought about the ideas of gender roles. Gender roles defined:

68 This brought about the ideas of gender roles. Women came to be associated with domestic duties, such as housekeeping, food preparation, child rearing and nurturing, and household management. Gender roles defined:

69 This brought about the ideas of gender roles. Women came to be associated with domestic duties, such as housekeeping, food preparation, child rearing and nurturing, and household management. The man came to be the “Bread winner” Gender roles defined:


Download ppt "Major Lifestyle Changes: The Middle Ages to 1800."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google