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D O M I C E A Transnational Project Funded by the European Union eveloping ffender anagement n orrections in urope This file introduces you to 1.

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Presentation on theme: "D O M I C E A Transnational Project Funded by the European Union eveloping ffender anagement n orrections in urope This file introduces you to 1."— Presentation transcript:

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2 D O M I C E A Transnational Project Funded by the European Union eveloping ffender anagement n orrections in urope This file introduces you to 1

3 DOMICE PROJECT A Transnational Project Funded by the European Union You are asked to work through this file by clicking your mouse; don’t click too quickly - leave time for the animations to complete. You don’t have to do anything else; the file is only to prepare you for our interview with you We only have this file in English; don’t worry if it’s not entirely clear to you; the project tackles a complex subject; we’ll try to make sure that you understand fully when we speak directly with you 2

4 OFFENDER To start with we would like you to think about each offender in your correctional system taking a “journey” through it Custody (which may be differentiated by....) Unsupervised release S Pre-sentence custody Pre-sentence assessment Post-release supervision Community sentence 1 Community sentence 2 Community sentence 3 Pre-sentence supervision Different levels of security Male/female Age Each system is different; each “journey” is different. We shall return to the different systems later 3

5 Intervention 1 Intervention 3 Intervention 2 Intervention 4 In all likelihood, different “interventions” will have to be applied at different stages. An intervention may be to address a problem associated with re-offending, to protect the public, or to satisfy a requirement set out by a court or judge They may be a compulsory part of the sentence, order or sanction, or they may be organised on a voluntary basis following an assessment An “intervention” may involve, for example co-operating with drug or alcohol treatment making good to a victim doing unpaid work keeping the offender under close inter-agency surveillance attending a behavioural programme living in supervised accommodation Custody (which may be differentiated by....) Unsupervised release S Pre-sentence custody Pre-sentence assessment Post-release supervision Community sentence 1 Community sentence 2 Community sentence 3 Pre-sentence supervision Different levels of security Male/female Age 4

6 Custody (which may be differentiated by....) Unsupervised release S Pre-sentence custody Pre-sentence assessment Post-release supervision Community sentence 1 Community sentence 2 Community sentence 3 Pre-sentence supervision Different levels of security Male/female Age Case Management OFFENDER The DOMICE Project is interested in this “case management” process There is often then a process which we call “case management”, through which decisions are made about which interventions need to be used. The offender is often required to keep regular appointments with someone to monitor progress and promote co-operation. This is often called “supervision” Someone usually communicates between the different interventions to make sure that the everything is properly integrated 5

7 Case Management The DOMICE Project Many organisations use “case management” as their main way of working. The key feature of “case management” is that arrangements are made for the delivery of services by someone other than he, she or those who will deliver that service. Decisions about what services are to be provided are usually informed by some form of assessment. The arrangements for providing services are usually expressed in some form of plan. Quite often, overall responsibility is assigned to one person who is often called a Case Manager. There is often some form of shared record system. 6

8 Case Management A high proportion of offenders have multiple needs and/or complex sentences. Offender plans are very likely to involve multiple contacts with one or more service providers, in a situation where enthusiastic, voluntary engagement is unlikely to be the norm. Projects and services tend to specialise in one form of intervention. As a result, some form of case management is an increasingly prevalent way of approaching the management of offenders. The DOMICE Project 7

9 Case Management Case management needs to be effectively undertaken in order to secure offenders’ compliance and co-operation ensure that the programme for each offender is properly individualised integrate the work of multiple different providers into a single coherent approach, and thus avoid duplication of effort. But “case management” takes many forms and can be organised and delivered in many different ways. The DOMICE Project 8

10 Case Management The DOMICE Project is an EU funded initiative to study, “capture”, share and analyse the different ways in which different countries in Europe understand, organise and deliver case management with offenders. We are interested in who does it, how it’s organised, what tasks it consists of and what we know about what works best. The DOMICE Project 9

11 Case Management However, it is already clear to us that it is difficult to understand how and where “case management” operates in any correctional system without first understanding the basic structure of that system. So our first series of interviews and contacts aims to establish a “sketch map” of how your correctional system operates. We will then use the Focus Groups and follow-up interviews to look more closely at your approach to case management. The DOMICE Project 10

12 Supervised ReleaseImmediate Custody Community-based Options Pre-Sentence Sentence Passed Pre-Sentence Custody 1.3 Pre-sentence assessment and report preparation 1.2 Pre-sentence supervision 2.1 Custody 3.1 Suspended Custody with Supervision 3.2 Community orders or sentences - types 1 - n 4.1 Post-Release Supervision in the Community Unsupervised Release The Basic Outline of Your Correctional System Looking again in a bit more detail at our “offender journey” we will try to adapt it so that it reflects the system in your country. In order to do this we will sub-divide it into 4 “domains”

13 Supervised ReleaseImmediate Custody Community-based Options Pre-Sentence Sentence Passed Pre-Sentence Custody 1.3 Pre-sentence assessment and report preparation 1.2 Pre-sentence supervision 2.1 Custody 3.1 Suspended Custody with Supervision 3.2 Community orders or sentences - types 1 - n 4.1 Post-Release Supervision in the Community Unsupervised Release We will ask you to try to provide an indication of scale? For example, how many reports do you prepare each year for your courts, how many people are under some form of supervision in the community at any time, how many are in custody? We will also try to establish whereabouts on your “map” you consider that some form of “case management” applies? 18,000 a year 250 a year 27,000 at any time 12

14 The Basic Outline of Your Correctional System We will try to understand how you organise and deliver “case management” with offenders. For example: 13

15 We will ask you to try to provide an indication of scale? For example, how many reports do you prepare each year for your courts, how many people are under some form of supervision in the community at any time, how many are in custody? We will also try to establish whereabouts on your “map” you consider that some form of “case management” applies? S Pre-sentence custody Pre-sentence assessment Custody which may be, for example, differentiated by Supervised release Unsupervised release Community sentence type1 Community sentence type 2 Community sentence type 3 Pre-sentence supervision Different levels of security Male and female offenders Age bands (juvenile, young adult, adult) Short or longer term sentences Sentence passed at any time 250 a year 27,000 at any time The Basic Outline of Your Correctional System Looking again in a bit more detail at our “offender journey” we will try to adapt it so that it reflects the system in your country. In order to do this we will sub-divide it into 4 “domains” – (1) pre-sentence, (2) post sentence – community, (3) post sentence – custody and (4) post release from custody 14

16 A Worked Example This “map” is adapted from the template to illustrate the correctional system in England and Wales. We have tried to indicate to level of detail we would like you to try to provide S Pre-sentence custody Pre-sentence assessment Custody which is differentiated by Supervised release Unsupervised release Fines and discharges Community Orders - 12 options Suspended Sentence Orders - 8 options Pre-sentence supervision Local “holding” prisons and “Training Prisons” Separate male and female facilities Separate juvenile, young adult and adult prisons 4 levels of security – A, B, C and D Sentence passed Offenders can be held in prison custody awaiting conviction or sentence Offenders can be housed in supervised accommodation awaiting conviction or sentence Offenders can be seen for the purpose of preparing assessment reports for courts (short form and long form) 10,000 at any time 600 – 800 at any time 250,000 per annum There are two types of community-based sentence – a Community Order and a Suspended Sentence Order, the latter carrying immediate imprisonment if breached. Each order may be composed of any combination of 12 requirements, which are specified in law. Most Orders include Unpaid Work or Supervision, or both 150,000 at any time The imprisoned population is separated by juvenile (under 18) and adult, male and female, and 4 levels of security (A, B, C and D). Shorter term prisoners (serving under 6 months) tend to be located nearer home; longer term prisoners tend to be located further afield 75,000 at present Short term prisoners (under 12 months) are released without any supervision after serving half their sentence in custody. Those sentenced to 12 months or over are all released subject to supervision, the length of which is proportional (mostly) to the original sentence. There are increasing numbers under supervision for life 30,000 under supervision at any time

17 Domain Where Case Management Occurs A key worker (case manager) is appointed to all of those housed in supported accommodation awaiting trial or sentence. The role is to engage, assess and motivate the individual, and secure access to helping agencies There is no case manager system for those held in custody prior to conviction or sentence, although prisoners have access to whatever services are available in the prison. Basic assessments are prepared to ensure the prisoner's safety. A “case manager” is appointed to all of those for whom a court requests a pre-sentence assessment. About 70% of these assessments/reports are prepared very quickly, so there are few expectations placed upon the case manager beyond assessment and preparation of the report. 30% of reports are prepared during a longer adjournment (typically 3 weeks). There are some expectations placed upon case managers during this period, but these are limited. Almost all community sentences are managed by the statutory probation service. A case manager is appointed to every case. There are two grades of case manager – basic trained and fully qualified. There is a framework for assigning different levels of resource and priority to different cases called “tiering”, based upon risks, needs and the complexity of the case. Higher standards apply to the higher risk/more complex cases For some cases in the prison population a community-based case manager is appointed, whose job is to co- ordinate what happens to the prisoner during custody and manage the transition back to the community. Such arrangements cover the higher-risk prisoners (c 20,000). For those serving over 12 months but not covered by these arrangements there is a process of assessment, planning and review, which is corporate-based with no specified individual “in charge”. With the exception of some localised initiatives, there is no equivalent process for short-term prisoners. There is no process of case management for those released without supervision. For those released under supervision a “case manager” is appointed by the statutory probation service whose role and working frameworks are the same as for those sentenced to a community sentence (2 above) A Worked Example ….and this slide explains where we think “case management” operates in the system in England and Wales 16

18 S Pre-sentence custody Pre-sentence assessment Custody Post-release supervision Unsupervised release Community sentence 1 Community sentence 2 Community sentence 3 Pre-sentence supervision 4 levels of security (A, B, C and D) Male/female Age If you recognise the role which we have described as “case manager” (you may call him or her something different), do your arrangements require that he/she is responsible for the offender, whatever that offender’s personal journey may look like: S Pre-sentence custody Pre-sentence assessment Custody Post-release supervision Unsupervised release Community sentence 1 Community sentence 2 Community sentence 3 Pre-sentence supervision 4 levels of security (A, B, C and D) Male/female Age ….or is a different case manager assigned for different sentences, or different kinds of sentence, or different stages of a sentence. For example: Managing Post- release supervisionPre-sentence work Preparing Post- sentence assessment and plan Managing Community-based sanction or measure Liaison through Custody Case Manager 1Case Manager 2Case Manager 3Case Manager 4Case Manager 5 The Same Case Manager as the Offender Passes through the System Who are your Case Managers? Are they state, private or “third sector” employees, or some combination of all three? What training and/or qualifications are they required to have? 17

19 Case Management If you have “case managers”, we are interested in finding out in a bit more detail what you expect them to DO. Below we have illustrated some of the tasks which we have found are expected of case managers. Some of these are discrete tasks which follow a sequence (like making a plan and then reviewing progress); others are continuous behaviours. Which of these do you expect of your case managers? Do the expectations vary from offender to offender or case manager to case manager? Are there other tasks not listed here? Are these expectations written down in some form of policy or manual? Preparing an initial assessment Preparing a plan Forming and maintaining a good working relationship with the offender Making the arrangements for implementing the plan Monitoring progress of the plan Visiting the offender at his/her home/family Taking enforcement action if the offender fails to comply Keeping case records in a prescribed form Undertaking counselling or therapy with the offender Reporting back on progress to a Judge or Court Advocate or negotiate on behalf of the offender Reviewing and updating the assessment and plan Sharing information with others Continuous liaison with other workers or agencies Meeting regularly with the offender at the officeSecuring the offender’s compliance/co-operation 18

20 What outcomes or results do you expect from your case managers or your case management approach? What do you expect them to achieve? Here are some of the outcomes which case managers believe they are required to achieve. Can you put them in order of priority for your correctional system? Are there others? Reduce Future Re-Offending Protect the Public Make Reparation to Individual Victims Get the Sentence Completed Improve Personal Growth and Development Solve Offender’s Problems Make sure that Punishment is Served Reduce Crime Overall Re-Integrate the Offender into Society Make Reparation to the Public Stop Re- Offending Priority Country 1? 2? 3? 4? 5? 6? Save Money Keep the Prison Population Down Improve credibility of non-custodial options 19

21 Managing the Workload Typically, how many offenders is one of your Case Managers responsible for at any time? Do these numbers vary, and by how much? Do your Case Managers have all the resources they need to deal effectively with every offender? Tier 1Tier 2Tier 3Tier 4 PUNISH CONTROL Dangerous Prolific Resources Risk, Needs and Complexity CHANGE HELP In England and Wales, for example, the resources and priority assigned to each offender (the tier of service) is based upon an assessment of the risk, needs and complexity of each case. For each tier: differently qualified staff are assigned different standards apply different workload weightings are allowed How do your Case Managers decide how to allocate their time and resources between cases? 12 each? 32 each? 108 each? 20

22 Finally have you undertaken any studies or evaluations about your case management arrangements which you are prepared to share internationally, or are there aspects of your case management arrangements which seem to you to work especially well and which you are prepared to share with others? Thank you for reading this file and thinking about the issues it raises. Either JO CHILVERS or TONY GRAPES from the DOMICE Project will speak with you shortly 21


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