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McGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright © 2013 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 The Balance Sheet PowerPoint Authors: Brandy Mackintosh.

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Presentation on theme: "McGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright © 2013 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 The Balance Sheet PowerPoint Authors: Brandy Mackintosh."— Presentation transcript:

1 McGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright © 2013 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 The Balance Sheet PowerPoint Authors: Brandy Mackintosh Lindsay Heiser

2 2-2 Learning Objective 2-1 Identify financial effects of common business activities that affect the balance sheet.

3 2-3 Building a Balance Sheet Assets amounts presently owed by a business to creditors. the amount invested and reinvested in a company by its shareholders. resources presently owned by a business that generate future economic benefit. Stockholders’ Equity Liabilities = +

4 2-4 Assets Debt Financing Equity Financing Companies rely on two sources of financing: Stockholders’ Equity Liabilities = + Financing and Investing Activities Invest in Assets &

5 2-5 Financing and Investing Activities 1. A company always documents its activities. 2. A company always receives something and gives something. 3. A dollar amount is determined for each exchange. Key FeaturesYour Goals Picture the documented activity. Name what’s exchanged. Analyze the financial effects.

6 2-6 Transactions and Other Activities External Exchanges Exchanges involving assets, liabilities, and stockholders’ equity that you can see between the company and someone else. Internal Events Events occurring within the company, for example, using some assets to create an inventory product.

7 2-7 Learning Objective 2-2 Apply transaction analysis to accounting transactions.

8 2-8 Study the Accounting Methods 1 Analyze 2 Record 3 Summarize A systematic accounting process is used to capture and report the financial effects of a company’s transactions. A transaction is a business activity that affects the basic accounting equation. Duality of Effects Every transaction has at least two effects on the basic accounting equation. A = L+ SE Assets must equal liabilities plus stockholders’ equity for every accounting transaction.

9 2-9 Step 1: Analyze Transactions The chart of accounts is tailored to each company’s business, so although some account titles are common across all companies (Cash, Accounts Payable) others may be used only by that particular company (Cookware).

10 2-10 Step 1: Analyze Transactions (a) Issue Stock to Owners. Mauricio Rosa incorporates Pizza Aroma Inc., on August 1. The company issues stock to Mauricio and his wife as evidence of their contribution of $50,000 cash, which is deposited in the company’s bank account. 1.Pizza Aroma receives $50,000 Cash. 2.Pizza Aroma gives $50,000 Stock (Contributed Capital ). LiabilitiesAssets=Stockholders’ Equity+ (a) Cash +$50,000Contributed Capital +$50,000

11 2-11 Step 1: Analyze Transactions (b) Investment in Equipment. 1.Pizza Aroma receives $42,000 of Equipment. 2.Pizza Aroma gives $42,000 Cash. Pizza Aroma pays $42,000 cash to buy restaurant booths and other equipment. LiabilitiesAssets=Stockholders’ Equity+ (b) Equipment +$42,000 Cash -$42,000

12 2-12 Step 1: Analyze Transactions (c) Obtain Loan from Bank. 1.Pizza Aroma receives $20,000 Cash. 2.Pizza Aroma gives a note, payable to the bank for $20,000. Pizza Aroma borrows $20,000 from a bank depositing those funds in its bank account and signing a formal agreement to repay the loan in two years. LiabilitiesAssets=Stockholders’ Equity+ (c) Cash +$20,000Note Payable +$20,000

13 2-13 Step 1: Analyze Transactions (d) Investment in Equipment. 1.Pizza Aroma receives $18,000 in equipment (pizza ovens). 2.Pizza Aroma gives a Cash of $16,000 and Accounts Payable of $2,000. Pizza Aroma purchases $18,000 in pizza ovens and other restaurant equipment, paying $16,000 in cash and giving an informal promise to pay $2,000 at the end of the month. LiabilitiesAssets=Stockholders’ Equity+ (d) Cash -$16,000 Equipment +$18,000 Accounts Payable +$2,000

14 2-14 Step 1: Analyze Transactions (e) Order Cookware. 1.An exchange of only promises is not a transaction. 2. There is no impact on the accounting equation. Pizza Aroma orders $630 of pans, dishes, and other cookware. None have been received yet. LiabilitiesAssets=Stockholders’ Equity+ No Impact

15 2-15 Step 1: Analyze Transactions (f) Pay Suppliers. 1.Pizza Aroma gives cash to settle its debt to the supplier. 2. Pizza Aroma receives a release from its promise to pay. Pizza Aroma pays $2,000 to the equipment supplier from transaction (d). LiabilitiesAssets=Stockholders’ Equity+ (f) Cash -$2,000Accounts Payable -$2,000

16 2-16 Step 1: Analyze Transactions (g) Receive Cookware. 1.Pizza Aroma receives cookware with a cost of $ Pizza Aroma gave a promise to pay $630 on account. Pizza Aroma receives $630 of the cookware ordered in (e) and promises to pay for it next month. LiabilitiesAssets=Stockholders’ Equity+ (g) Cookware +$630Accounts Payable +$630

17 2-17 Learning Objective 2-3 Use journal entries and T-accounts to show how transactions affect the balance sheet.

18 2-18 Step 2 and 3: Record and Summarize Most companies use computerized accounting systems, which can handle a large number of transactions. These systems follow a cycle, called the accounting cycle, which is repeated day-after-day, month-after-month, and year-after-year.

19 2-19 The Debit/Credit Framework ASSETS = LIABILITIES + STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY Asset accounts increase on the left or debit side and decrease on the right or credit side. Liability accounts increase on the right or credit side and decrease on the left or debit side. Stockholders’ equity accounts increase on the right or credit side and decrease on the left or debit side.

20 2-20 The Debit/Credit Framework ASSETS = LIABILITIES + STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY Take special note of two important rules: 1.Accounts increase on the same side as they appear in A = L + SE 2.Left is debit ( dr ), right is credit ( cr )

21 2-21 Steps 2 & 3: Record and Summarize 1 Analyze 2 Record 3 Summarize General Journal Page G1 Date Account Title and Explanation Ref.DebitCredit

22 2-22 Steps 2 & 3: Record and Summarize 1 Analyze 2 Record 3 Summarize General Journal Page G1 Date Account Title and Explanation Ref.DebitCredit /1Cash Contributed Capital (Financing from stockholders) ,000 General Ledger Account: Cash Balance DateExplanationRef.DebitCredit /1G150,000 Acct 101 General Ledger Account: Contributed Capital Balance DateExplanationRef.DebitCredit /1G150,000 Acct 301

23 2-23 Steps 2 & 3: Record and Summarize 1 Analyze 2 Record 3 Summarize General Ledger Account: Cash Balance DateExplanationRef.DebitCredit /1G150,000 Acct 101 General Ledger Account: Contributed Capital Balance DateExplanationRef.DebitCredit /1G150,000 Acct 301 (a)dr Cash (+A) cr Contributed Capital (+SE)50,000

24 2-24 General Ledger Account: Contributed Capital Balance DateExplanationRef.DebitCredit /1G150,000 Acct 301 General Ledger Account: Cash Balance DateExplanationRef.DebitCredit /1G150,000 Acct 101 Steps 2 & 3: Record and Summarize 1 Analyze 2 Record 3 Summarize (a)dr Cash (+A) cr Contributed Capital (+SE)50,000

25 2-25 Pizza Aroma’s Accounting Records (a) Issue Stock to Owners. Mauricio Rosa incorporates Pizza Aroma Inc., on August 1. The company issues stock to Mauricio and his wife as evidence of their contribution of $50,000 cash, which is deposited in the company’s bank account. 1 Analyze LiabilitiesAssets = Stockholders’ Equity + (a) Cash +$50,000Contributed Capital +$50,000 2 Record (a)dr Cash (+A) cr Contributed Capital (+SE)50,000 3 Summarize Beg. Bal. (a) Cash (A) dr + cr ,000 Beg. Bal. (a) Contributed Capital (SE)dr - cr ,000

26 2-26 Pizza Aroma’s Accounting Records (b) Investment in Equipment. Pizza Aroma pays $42,000 cash to buy restaurant booths and other equipment. 1 Analyze LiabilitiesAssets = Stockholders’ Equity + (b) Cash -$42,000 Equipment +$42,000 2 Record (b)dr Equipment (+A) cr Cash (-A)42,000 3 Summarize Beg. Bal. (a) (b) Cash (A) dr + cr ,000 42,000 Beg. Bal. (b) Equipment (A)dr + cr ,000

27 2-27 Pizza Aroma’s Accounting Records (c) Obtain Loan from Bank. Pizza Aroma borrows $20,000 from a bank depositing those funds in its bank account and signing a formal agreement to repay the loan in two years. 1 Analyze LiabilitiesAssets = Stockholders’ Equity + (c) Cash +$20,000 Note Payable +$20,000 2 Record (c)dr Cash (+A) cr Note Payable (+L)20,000 3 Summarize Beg. Bal. (a) (c) (b) Cash (A) dr + cr ,000 20,000 42,000 Beg. Bal. (c) Note Payable (L) dr - cr ,000

28 2-28 Pizza Aroma’s Accounting Records (d) Investment in Equipment. Pizza Aroma purchases $18,000 in pizza ovens and other restaurant equipment, paying $16,000 in cash and giving an informal promise to pay $2,000 at the end of the month. 1 Analyze LiabilitiesAssets = Stockholders’ Equity + (d) Cash -$16,000 Equipment +$18,000 Accounts Payable +$2,000 2 Record 16,000 2,000 (d)dr Equipment (+A) cr Cash (-A) cr Accounts Payable (+L) 18,000 Beg. Bal. (d) Accounts Payable (L) dr - cr + 0 2,000 3 Summarize Beg. Bal. (a) (c) (b) (d) Cash (A) dr + cr ,000 20,000 42,000 16,000 Equipment (A) dr + cr - Beg. Bal. (b) (d) 0 42,000 18,000

29 2-29 Pizza Aroma’s Accounting Records (f) Pay Suppliers. Pizza Aroma pays $2,000 to the equipment supplier from the last transaction. 1 Analyze LiabilitiesAssets = Stockholders’ Equity + (f) Cash -$2,000 Accounts Payable -$2,000 2 Record (f)dr Accounts Payable (-L) cr Cash (-A)2,000 3 Summarize Beg. Bal. (a) (c) (b) (d) (f) Cash (A) dr + cr ,000 20,000 42,000 16,000 2,000 (f) Beg. Bal. (d) Accounts Payable (L) dr - cr + 2, ,000

30 2-30 Pizza Aroma’s Accounting Records (g) Receive Cookware. Pizza Aroma receives $630 of the cookware previously ordered and promises to pay for it next month. 1 Analyze LiabilitiesAssets = Stockholders’ Equity + (g) Cookware +$630 Accounts Payable +$630 2 Record (g)dr Cookware (+A) cr Accounts Payable (+L)630 3 Summarize Beg. Bal. (g) Cookware (A) dr + cr (f) Beg. Bal. (d) (g) Accounts Payable (L) dr - cr + 2, ,

31 2-31 T-Accounts for Pizza Aroma Cash Beg. Bal. (a) (c) - 50,000 20,000 42,000 16,000 2,000 (b) (d) (f) End. Bal.10,000 Equipment Beg. Bal. (b) (d) - 42,000 18,000 End. Bal.60,000 Cookware Beg. Bal. (g) End. Bal. 630 Accounts Payable (f)2, , Beg. Bal. (d) (g) 630End. Bal. Notes Payable - 20,000 Beg. Bal. (c) 20,000End. Bal. Contributed Capital - 50,000 Beg. Bal. (a) 50,000End. Bal.

32 2-32 Learning Objective 2-4 Prepare a classified balance sheet.

33 2-33 Preparing a Balance Sheet It’s a good idea to check that the accounting records are in balance by determining whether debits = credits. We do this by preparing a Trial Balance. Pizza Aroma, Inc. Trial Balance August 31, 2013 Cash Cookware Equipment Accounts Payable Note Payable Contributed Capital Totals Debit $10, ,000 $70,630 Credit $ ,000 50,000 $70,630

34 2-34 Classified Balance Sheet Current assets will be used up or converted into cash within the next 12 months. Long-term assets include resources that will be used or converted into cash more than 12 months after the balance sheet date. Pizza Aroma, Inc. Balance Sheet At August 31, 2013 Current Assets: Cash Cookware Total Current Assets Property, Plant, and Equipment: Equipment Total Assets: Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity: Current Liabilities: Accounts Payable Long-Term Liabilities: Note Payable Total Liabilities: Stockholders’ Equity Contributed Capital Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity $10, ,630 60,000 $70,630 $ ,000 20,630 50,000 $70,630

35 2-35 Learning Objective 2-5 Interpret the balance sheet using the current ratio and an understanding of related concepts..

36 2-36 Assessing the Ability to Pay Current Ratio = Current Assets Current Liabilities A higher current ratio generally means a better ability to pay. Pizza Aroma’s current ratio is unusually high = $ 10,630 $ 630 = Pizza Aroma, Inc. Balance Sheet At August 31, 2013 Current Assets: Cash Cookware Total Current Assets Property, Plant, and Equipment: Equipment Total Assets: Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity: Current Liabilities: Accounts Payable Long-Term Liabilities: Note Payable Total Liabilities: Stockholders’ Equity Contributed Capital Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity $10, ,630 60,000 $70,630 $ ,000 20,630 50,000 $70,630

37 2-37 Balance Sheet Concepts and Values What is (is not) recorded? Includes items acquired through exchange. Excludes other items (such as secret recipes). What is (is not) recorded? Includes items acquired through exchange. Excludes other items (such as secret recipes). What amounts? Initially recorded at cost. Conservatism leads to recording decreases in asset value but generally not increases. What amounts? Initially recorded at cost. Conservatism leads to recording decreases in asset value but generally not increases. Pizza Aroma, Inc. Balance Sheet At August 31, 2013 Current Assets: Cash Cookware Total Current Assets Property, Plant, and Equipment: Equipment Total Assets: Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity: Current Liabilities: Accounts Payable Long-Term Liabilities: Note Payable Total Liabilities: Stockholders’ Equity Contributed Capital Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity $10, ,630 60,000 $70,630 $ ,000 20,630 50,000 $70,630

38 McGraw-Hill/IrwinCopyright © 2013 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Chapter 2 Solved Exercises M2-13, M2-15, M2-17, M2-19, E2-4, E2-6

39 2-39 M2-13 Identifying Transactions and Preparing Journal Entries J.K. Builders was incorporated on July 1, Prepare journal entries for the following events from the first month of business. If the event is not a transactions, write “no transaction.” a.Received $70,000 cash invested by owners and issued stock. b.Bought an unused field from a local farmer by paying $60,000 cash. As a construction site for smaller projects it is estimated to be worth $65,000 to J.K. Builders. c.A lumber supplier delivered lumber to J.K. Builders for future use. The lumber would have normally sold for $10,000, but the supplier gave J.K. Builders a 10% discount. J.K. Builders has not received a bill from the suppliers. a.dr Cash (+A)70,000 cr Contributed Capital (+SE)70,000 b. dr Inventory (+A)60,000 cr Cash (-A)60,000 c. dr Supplies (+A) 9,000 cr Cash (-A) 9,000 $10,000 × 10% = $1,000; $10,000 - $1,000 = $9,000

40 2-40 M2-13 Identifying Transactions and Preparing Journal Entries d.Borrowed $25,000 from the bank with a plan to use the funds to build a small workshop in August. The loan must be repaid in two years. e.One of the owners sold $10,000 worth of his stock to another shareholder for $11,000. e. No transaction Event (e) is a transaction between two independent individuals and does not involve the company, J.K. Builders. d.dr Cash (+A)25,000 cr Notes Payable (+L)25,000

41 2-41 M2-15 Identifying Transactions and Preparing Journal Entries Joel Henry founded bookmart.com at the beginning of August, which sells new and used books online. He is passionate about books but does not have a lot of accounting experience. Help Joel by preparing journal entries for the following events. If the event is not a transaction, write “no transaction.” a.The company purchased equipment for $4,000 cash. The equipment is expected to be used for ten or more years. b.Joel’s business bought $7,000 worth of books from a publisher. The company will pay the publisher within days. a.dr Equipment (+A)4,000 cr Cash (-A)4,000 b. dr Inventory (+A)7,000 cr Accounts Payable (+L)7,000

42 2-42 M2-15 Identifying Transactions and Preparing Journal Entries c.Joel’s friend Sam lent $4,000 to the business. Sam had Joel write a note promising that bookmart.com would repay the $4,000 in four months. Because they are good friends, Sam is not going to charge Joel interest. d.The company paid $1,500 cash, for books purchased on account earlier in the month. e.Bookmart.com repaid the $4,000 loan established in c. c.dr Cash (+A)4,000 cr Notes Payable (+L)4,000 d.dr Accounts Payable (-L)1,500 cr Cash (-A)1,500 e.dr Notes Payable (-L)4,000 cr Cash (-A)4,000

43 2-43 M2-17 Identifying Transactions and Preparing Journal Entries Sweet Shop Co. Is a chain of candy stores that has been in operation for the past ten years. Prepare journal entries for the following events, which occurred at the end of the most recent year. If the event is not a transaction, write “no transaction.” a.Ordered and received $12,000 worth of cotton candy machines from Candy Makers, Inc., which Sweet Shop Co. Will pay for in 45 days. b.Sent a check for $6,000 to Candy Makers, Inc. for partial payment of the cotton candy machines from (a) c.Received $400 from customers who bought candy on account in previous months. a.dr Equipment (+A)12,000 cr Accounts Payable (+L)12,000 b.dr Accounts Payable (-L) 6,000 cr Cash (-A) 6,000 c.dr Cash (+A) 400 cr Accounts Receivable (-A) 400

44 2-44 M2-17 Identifying Transactions and Preparing Journal Entries d.To help raise funds for store upgrades estimated to cost $20,000, Sweet Shop Co. Issued 1,000 shares for $15 each to existing stockholders. e.Sweet Shop Co. bought ice cream trucks for $60,000 total, paying $10,000 cash and signing a long-term note for $50,000. d.dr Cash (+A)15,000 cr Contributed Capital (+SE)15,000 e.dr Equipment (+A) 60,000 cr Notes Payable (+L) 50,000 cr Cash (-A)10,000 1,000 shares × $15 each = $15,000

45 2-45 M2-19 Identifying Transactions and Preparing Journal Entries Katy Williams is the manager of Blue Light Arcade. The company provides entertainment for parties and special events. Prepare journal entries for the following events relating to the year ended December 31. If the event is not a transaction, write “no transaction.” a.Blue Light Arcade received $50 cash on account for a birthday party held two months ago. b.Agreed to hire a new employee at a monthly salary of $3,000. The employee starts work next month. c.Paid $2,000 for a table top hockey game purchased last month on account. a.dr Cash (+A)50 cr Accounts Receivable (-A)50 b.No Transaction c.dr Accounts Payable (-L) 2,000 cr Cash (-A) 2,000 The employee has yet to provide any services to the company

46 2-46 M2-19 Identifying Transactions and Preparing Journal Entries Prepare journal entries for the following events relating to the year ended December 31. If the event is not a transaction, write “no transaction.” d.Repaid a $5,000 bank loan that had been outstanding for 6 months. (Ignore interest). e.The company purchased an air hockey table for $2,200, paying $1,000 cash and signing short-term note for $1,200. d.dr Notes Payable (-L)5,000 cr Cash (-A)5,000 e.dr Equipment (+A) 2,200 cr Cash (-A) 1,000 cr Notes Payable (+L) 1,200

47 2-47 End of Chapter 2


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