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Bev Perrault Donna Hunziker DQ 1: COMMUNICATING LEARNING GOALS AND FEEDBACK Please sit 4 to a table. Create & label foldable and begin bell work. (See.

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Presentation on theme: "Bev Perrault Donna Hunziker DQ 1: COMMUNICATING LEARNING GOALS AND FEEDBACK Please sit 4 to a table. Create & label foldable and begin bell work. (See."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bev Perrault Donna Hunziker DQ 1: COMMUNICATING LEARNING GOALS AND FEEDBACK Please sit 4 to a table. Create & label foldable and begin bell work. (See instructions at your table.)

2 Bell Work Individually: 1.Using 3 sheets of paper, create and label a Flip Book Foldable. See Example at table. 2.In your foldable, use a graphic organizer of your choice to compare and contrast the characteristics of a “Checking for Understanding Scale” & an “Academic Scale.” Collaboratively: 1.Describe how you use Checking for Understanding Scales in your classroom. 2.Describe how you use Academic Scales in your classroom.

3 GROUP NORMS  Are respectful of other’s opinions and listen with an open mind; limit the use of electronics for checking s to breaks; focus on instructional model and not evaluation process  Collaborate in group work  Take responsibility for engaging in learning and continuous growth It’s Okay to have Fun! Suffering is Optional.

4 Participants will be able to describe how to communicate learning goals and provide specific feedback so that students understand their level on the scale and are motivated to enhance their status. LEARNING GOAL

5 Instructional Excellence & Equity Accessing the Power Point and other support materials from the Instructional Model and Instruction website From the DEPARTMENTS Tab, Choose : Instructional Model & Evaluation Menu Tabs

6 RESEARCH ON AVERAGE, THE PRACTICE OF HAVING STUDENTS TRACK THEIR OWN PROGRESS WAS ASSOCIATED WITH A 32 PERCENTILE POINT GAIN IN THEIR ACHIEVEMENT. KINGPROGRESS.ASPX KINGPROGRESS.ASPX

7 1. Providing Clear Learning Goals & Scales The teacher provides a clearly stated learning goal accompanied by scale or rubric that describes levels of performance relative to the learning goal. Teacher Evidence  Teacher has a learning goal posted so that all students can see it  The learning goal is a clear statement of knowledge or information as opposed to an activity or assignment  Teacher makes reference to the learning goal throughout the lesson  Teacher has a scale or rubric that relates to the learning goal posted so that all students can see it  Teacher makes reference to the scale or rubric throughout the lesson Student Evidence  When asked, students can explain the learning goal for the lesson  When asked, students can explain how their current activities relate to the learning goal  When asked, students can explain the meaning of the levels of performance articulated in the scale or rubric

8 1 Providing Clear Learning Goals & Scales Teacher Teacher provides clearly stated learning goal accompanied by a scale that describes levels of performance relative to the learning goal. Student Students understand the learning goal and the levels of performance on the scale.

9 Instructional Excellence & Equity  Non Specific  Communicates student self-assessment of daily objective current activity instructions  Specific to Learning Goal  Identifies levels of progressive complexity towards mastery of the learning goal. Score 2.0 – Simple Content Score 3.0 – Complex Content of Learning Goal Score 4.0 – More Complex Content

10 Instructional Excellence & Equity 2

11 2

12 Scales and the Use of Feedback (Center IF/Then) If goals provide clear targets for learning Then feedback facilitates the process of reaching those targets.

13 2. Tracking Student Progress The teacher facilitates tracking of student progress on one or more learning goals using a formative approach to assessment. Teacher Evidence  Teacher helps student track their individual progress on the learning goal  Teacher uses formal and informal means to assign scores to students on the scale or rubric depicting student status on the learning goal  Teacher charts the progress of the entire class on the learning goal Student Evidence  When asked, students can describe their status relative to the learning goal using the scale or rubric  Students systematically update their status on the learning goal

14 2. Tracking Student Progress Rating Scale + Highly Effective + Highly Effective Developing /Needs Improvement Unsatisfactory Adapts and creates new strategies for unique student needs and situations in order for the desired effect to be evident in all students. Facilitates tracking of student progress using a formative approach to assessment and monitors for evidence of the extent to which the majority of students understand their level of performance. Facilitates tracking of student progress using a formative approach to assessment, but the majority of students are not monitored for the desired effect of the strategy. Uses strategy incorrectly or with parts missing. Strategy was called for but not exhibited. Facilitates tracking of student progress USING a FORMATIVE APPROACH TO ASSESSMENT and students understand their level of performance. Facilitates tracking of student progress USING A FORMATIVE APPROACH TO ASSESSMENT, desired effect

15 Tracking Student Progress Teacher Teacher facilitates tracking of student progress using a FORMATIVE approach to assessment. Student Students understand their level of performance on the scale. 2

16 Assessment Card Sort Sort cards by assessment category. 5 Minutes

17 17 for of Assessment for Learning Assessment of Learning

18 Teachers, students and parents are the primary users Teachers, principals, supervisors, program planners, and policy makers are the primary users During learningAfter learning Used to provide information on what and how to improve achievement Used to certify student competence Used by teachers to identify and respond to student needs Used to rank and sort students Purpose: improve learningPurpose: document achievement of standards Primary motivator: belief that success is achievable Primary motivator: threat of punishment, promise of reward ContinuousPeriodic Examples: peer assessment, using rubrics with students, descriptive feedback Examples: final exams, placement tests, state assessments, unit tests

19 “The Best Value in Formative Assessment” As you read the article, code and annotate the text as follows: Confirms what you thought Contradicts what you thought Raises a question Strikes you as very important ! Is new, interesting, or surprising Connects to your life, the world, or other things you’ve read After reading the article, you will discuss and respond to questions. 20 Minutes

20 “The Best Value in Formative Assessment” After reading the article, discuss responses using textual evidence. (Write responses in foldable.) 1.Compare summative and formative assessments. 2.Describe characteristics of effective feedback. 3.Differentiate summative feedback from feedback in the formative assessment process. 4.Educators often claim that allowing students to correct test items or retake a test does not hold the student responsible for being prepared. Using evidence from the text, how would the authors counter this assertion? 20 Minutes

21 #FormativeAssessment Summarize what you’ve learned about formative assessment in 140 characters or less. TWITTER POST EXIT SLIP (POST-IT NOTE) Want a Break?

22 ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING If formative assessment is about more frequent, assessment FOR learning is about continuous. If formative assessment is about providing teachers with evidence, assessment FOR learning is about informing the students themselves. If formative assessment tells users who is and who is not meeting state standards, assessment FOR learning tells them what progress each student is making toward meeting each standard while the learning is happening—when there’s still time to be helpful. Rick Stiggins (2005)

23 Provide Clear Learning Goals/Scales Use Examples of Strong & Weak Work Elicit Evidence of Student Learning (discussion, activity, products, formative assessment tools) Teach Students to Self Assess Using Evidence, Track Progress, & Set Goals Provide Regular Descriptive Feedback that Moves Students Forward Create a Classroom Climate that Promotes Collaboration & Peer Feedback Engage Students in Reflective Practice and Focused Revision Formative Assessment Process Instructional Excellence and Equity

24 Strategies Traffic Light Card Sort Brainstorm Round Robin Reporting Predictions Performance Assessment Highlight / Green Light Correction s Self Assessment Peer Assessment Think Pair Share Concept Map Reflection Survey Assessment Probe Drawing Completion

25 Tracking My Progress. MarzanoResearch.com

26 Elementary Tracking Examples from our Classrooms

27 0 is the “Starting Line.” Evidence is required to move up the scale. Students electronically move their status once they have evidence of learning. Elementary Tracking Examples from our Classrooms

28 3rd Grade Students keep track of progress directly on the scale using evidence identified from three assessments. In addition current status is tracked as a class on the board. (Both photos are from the same class and show the same scale.) Notice Bar is colored in to indicate current status.

29 Secondary Tracking Examples from our Classrooms Students track progress on a tracking sheet in their journal. Evidence is included for each tracking point. (The summative assessment includes questions at all levels on the scale.) 7 th Grade

30 Secondary Tracking Examples from our Classrooms Students track progress directly on the scale with star stickers, notating the date a level is achieved. Students record evidence in their reflection journals.

31 Secondary Tracking Examples from our Classrooms Students keep track of progress directly on the scale using evidence identified on a specific assessment. Concepts and skills mastered are checked off for the identified assessment(s). PreTest – 1.5 √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ Quiz – 2.5 √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √

32 3. Celebrating Student Success The teacher provides students with recognition of their current status and their knowledge gain relative to the learning goal. Teacher Evidence  Teacher acknowledges students who have achieved a certain score on the scale or rubric  Teacher acknowledges students who have made gains in their knowledge and skill relative to the learning goal  Teacher acknowledges and celebrates the final status and progress of the entire class  Teacher uses a variety of ways to celebrate success  Show of hands  Certification of success  Parent notification  Round of applause Student Evidence  Student show signs of pride regarding their accomplishments in the class  When asked, students say they want to continue to make progress

33 Celebrating Student Success Teacher Teacher provides students with recognition of their current status and their knowledge gain relative to the learning goal. Student Students are motivated to enhance their status on the scale.

34 Round Table – All Write Brainstorm How do you celebrate student success? 2 Minutes 1.The 1 st participant shares an example of celebrating student success. All participants write the example in foldable. 2.Do NOT talk about or evaluate the shared examples. The idea is to list as many ideas as possible. 3.Rotate clockwise and repeat until time is called. 4.You may pass until your next turn if you need more time to think of another example. After Brainstorming time is called, discuss the examples and choose three that you will try in your classroom. 3 Minutes

35 Verbal Feedback  Note what a student did well on a task  Take care not to attribute student success to “fixed” characteristics such as talent  Include statements about effort when giving feedback: hard work, focused, well prepared, thinking skills, etc. Acknowledging Progress  Celebrate gains on the scale from initial to final scores Final Status Celebration  Celebrate students’ final status on the scale  Recognize students who received mastery of 3.0 and above STRATEGIES FOR CELEBRAING STUDENT SUCCESS

36 4 Minutes Reflection (On the BACK of your foldable) 3. Write three new things you’ve learned. 2. Write two questions you have. 1. Which strategy will you implement in your classroom in the next week?

37 Providing Clear LG & Scale TEACHER :. provides clearly stated LG accompanied by a scale that describes levels of performance relative to the learning goal. STUDENTS:. understand the learning goal and the levels of performance on the scale. Tracking Student Progress TEACHER :. facilitates tracking of student progress using a FORMATIVE approach to assessment. STUDENTS:. understand their level of performance on the scale. Celebrating Student Success TEACHER : provides students with recognition of their current status and their knowledge gain relative to the learning goal. STUDENTS:. are motivated to enhance their status on the scale. 2 & & & DQ1: What will I do to establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and celebrate success? Instructional Excellence and Equity

38 Sign-In Sheet and Blank Sign-In Sheet Bell work Directions - Slide #2 (1 per table in page protector) Foldable Example (1 per table in page protector) Colored Paper for Foldable (3 sheets per participant) & Crayola Markers Protocol for Indicator 2: Handout Number cards (Set of #1 and #2 per participant) Post-it Notes Crayola Markers T-Chart for Formative and Summative (Sorting) Cards for Formative and Summative Sorting Activity Article: “The Best Value in Formative Assessment” (1 per participant) Article Questions - Slide #20 (1 per table) Text-Coding Bookmark (1 per participant) Participant Take-Away Handout (Formative Assessment Process and DQ1 Teacher and Student Expectations) Learning Log PD Materials List


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