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Results from the MLC Evaluation Ruth Wetta-Hall, RN, PhD, MPH, MSN Kansas Public Health Conference September 20, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Results from the MLC Evaluation Ruth Wetta-Hall, RN, PhD, MPH, MSN Kansas Public Health Conference September 20, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Results from the MLC Evaluation Ruth Wetta-Hall, RN, PhD, MPH, MSN Kansas Public Health Conference September 20, 2011

2 Multi-State Learning Collaborative Focus Group Study Purpose:  Assess the MLC training (design, implementation, and short-term outputs)  Impact on accreditation preparation and in developing a QI culture Methods: 3 telephone-based focus groups conducted with MLC training participants  Northwest BT Region (frontier)  West Central Public Health Initiative (rural)  Kansas South Central Metro Region (urban)  Wildcat Region (rural) Participants:  Aged years  Predominantly female  Employed in a public health setting for 6-10 years.  Held administrative or emergency preparedness positions

3 Themes Associated with the MLC Initiative in Kansas

4 Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses of Training by MLC Group Note: + positive views, - negative views, +/- mixed views, N/A not applicable

5 Conclusions A working definition of QI in public health settings “small qi” is associated with project level QI is associated “Big QI” is linked to an organization-wide commitment to QI Findings suggest that the Kansas MLC project helped to initiate “small qi” within the state’s public health infrastructure. has fostered the desire to build toward “Big QI” among participants. Leadership at both the local and state level play a key role in the accreditation and QI effort.

6 Recommendations 1. Identify resources for ongoing technical support for QI training, including experts and practitioners with applied experience 2. Identify resources to support QI training expenses 3. Training programs should incorporate interactive, peer-to-peer experiential learning methods 4. Design a “generic” QI training and implementation plan to support standardization of forms, guidelines and policies 5. Incorporate QI/Accreditation training into existing conferences and within required training for public health practitioners 6. Create forums for multi-disciplinary and cross-functional teams that would include social service agencies, other NGOs in addition to local and state public health departments 7. Design and implement a plan for training dissemination on use of QI tools within participants’ organizations and public health system

7 Recommendations 8. Offer QI training in all four quadrants of the state or combined public health regions 9. Convene bi-annual learning congresses either live or by webcast, to present and discuss “Lessons Learned” associated with QI activities. Schedule time between meetings to absorb and apply material learned 10. Explore opportunities to promote continued collaborations 11. Design, implement and assess facilitator training for unit, department and community facilitation 12. Explore methods to provide ongoing training on data types, data collection, methods and analysis 13. Identify, organize and disseminate website information that organizes existing data sources for use by LHDs and communities 14. Extend community health assessment training to include community health planning and implementation content and activities.


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