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Welcome to the Complete Streets Training October 5, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to the Complete Streets Training October 5, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to the Complete Streets Training October 5, 2010

2 Introduction Presenters Rhonda Rudolph, CS Coordinator Jackson County Health Department Scott TenBrink. Exec. Director Jackson Fitness Council Holly Madill, Michigan Department of Community Health Introduction

3 Complete Streets Grant Recipient Jackson was one of seven communities in the State of Michigan to receive funding. Efforts are aimed at policy change to create a healthier environment. Introduction

4 Introductions Welcome to everyone who has taken time out of your busy day to attend this training. Cities Counties State Local organizations Introduction

5 1.Increase your knowledge of Complete Streets 2.Make you aware of local, state and national efforts. 3.Increase your understanding of various elements of a complete street ordinance. 4.Demonstrate need for local ordinance. Goals Introduction

6 Survey Results

7

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9 Survey Data Survey Date

10 What are “Complete Streets”? Roadways planned, designed and constructed to accommodate safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities are able to safely move along and across streets which may include sidewalks, crosswalks, and bike lanes. Complete Streets defined

11 Roadways planned, designed and constructed to accommodate safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities are able to safely move along and across streets which may include sidewalks, crosswalks, and bike lanes. All Users Disabled Elderly Children Adults All Users – All Modes of Travel 1 in 3 Michiganders don’t drive 16% of Jackson house- holds don’t have a car All Modes Bicycles Foot Traffic Wheelchairs Automotive Cargo Trucks School and Transit Buses Emergency and Law Enforcement Vehicles

12 All Phases Roadways planned, designed and constructed to accommodate safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities are able to safely move along and across streets which may include sidewalks, crosswalks, and bike lanes. Planning Designing Constructing / Reconstructing Maintenance

13 There is no prescription for a complete street Examples include but are not limited to: a.Bike lanes b.Wide lanes with sharrow c.Off road paths d.Parallel routes Context Sensitive UrbanSuburbanRural Roadways planned, designed and constructed to accommodate safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities are able to safely move along and across streets which may include sidewalks, crosswalks, and bike lanes.

14 Context Sensitive Roadways planned, designed and constructed to accommodate safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities are able to safely move along and across streets which may include sidewalks, crosswalks, and bike lanes. Context Sensitive Solutions- A collaborative, interdisciplinary approach that involves all stakeholders to develop a transportation facility that fits its physical setting and preserves scenic, aesthetic, historic and environmental resources, while maintaining safety and mobility. CSS is an approach that considers the total context within which a transportation improvement project will exist. CSS is an approach that can be part of complete streets.

15 Current Efforts City of Jackson has been committed to the Complete Streets concept for several years. Planning –A destination bike route map was developed and is updated on a regular basis to reflect changing needs and construction. The map is use as a guide for installation of bike facilities. –Bicycle needs are evaluated and incorporated into projects where feasible. –Road widths are selected that are appropriate for all user needs. –Sidewalk conditions are evaluated and repairs or new construction budgeted as appropriate. Local Jackson Info

16 City of Jackson Non Motorized Plan Current Efforts Planning

17 Design and Construction –Missing, hazardous or ADA noncompliant sidewalks are identified and corrected during construction –Sidewalk ramps at pedestrian crossings are designed and constructed to current standards. –Bike facilities are constructed when appropriate. –Where needed and practical traffic calming measures are installed. Local Jackson Info Current Efforts

18 Complete Street Projects Local Jackson Info Current Efforts

19 Complete Street Projects Current Efforts Local Jackson Info

20 Complete Street Projects Current Efforts Local Jackson Info

21 Safe Routes to School Regional Trailways Plan Non-Motorized Plan The Broader Context CS Definition Public Transit ADA Compliance Walkable, Bikeable Communities

22 Cross Department Impact CS Defined 1.Transportation 2.Land Use and Zoning (DDA Design Recommendations) 3.Parks & Recreation 4.Economic Development 5.Community Health

23 Small Group Exercise Group Breakup – Assigned Examine the picture located at your table. Recommend at least 2 changes that would make this street more complete. Designate someone to present your group ideas to the group. TIME LIMIT – 5 minutes Group exercise

24 Site A Group exercise

25 Site B Group Exercise

26 Site C Group Exercise

27 Site D Group Exercise

28 Complete Streets Impact on Jackson Complete streets play an important role in livable communities, where it is safe, easy, and fun to live, work, and play. 1. Accessibility & Equity 2. Health 3. Safety 4. Economy 5. Sense of Community Complete Streets Impact

29 Complete Streets Impact on Jackson Accessibility & Equity –ADA Requirements –In 2000, 20.5% of Jackson’s population over the age of 5 years was considered disabled as complared to 17.3% (County) and 17.2% (State) with the highest percent of disable people in the year age bracket. –Disabled individuals comprised 20.8% of the population during the time period and 65.6% of those people were years of age. Source:City of Jackson Development Plan Draft Review –16% of Jackson households don’t have a car. Complete Streets Impact

30 Health The Health Improvement Organization has identified physical activity as a focus area for community action based on the 2008 Community Health Assessment. (self reported data) –High obesity rates Seven out of ten Jackson County residents are either overweight or obese. –Low physical activity levels Only one out of four Jackson County residents get the amount of exercise recommended by national health experts. Level of activity is correlated with physical environment. Complete Street Impact

31 Safety - Nationally FMIS, NHTS, FARS federal databases Installing pedestrian and bicycle facilities can reduce the risk of traffic accidents by 28% National Complete Streets Complete Street Impact

32 Safety – City of Jackson 190 Pedestrian crashes –6 fatalities 192 Bicyclist crashes Data from Jan 1, 2000 – Feb. 11, 2010 Source: Michigan Crash Facts.org Complete Street Impact

33 Economy By making a community more walkable, property values can increase from $10-$40/sq.ft. to $50-$100/sq.ft. and homebuyers are willing to pay $20,000 more. Michiganders aged 18-35, rank “safe streets” and “walkable streets” in the top three attributes when considering a place to live and work. Businesses that provide opportunities for employeesto walk and bicycle during the workday report a 30% reduction health care costs. Complete streets can help increase retail sales by slowing traffic and roviding pedestrians and bicyclists with an inviting place to do their hopping. Complete Street Impact

34 Economy continued Eight core assets of a 21 st Century Community 1. Physical Design & Walkability Whether your community is big or small, it is important to create a physical fabric that promotes social connections where people can live, work, shop and play. 2. Green Initiatives 3. Cultural Economic Development 4. Entrepreneurship 5. Diversity/Multiculturalism 6. Messaging & Technology 7. Transit People are choosing where they want to live, play and work in communities that embrace all modes of transportation—walking, biking and public transit. 8. Education (K-16) Introduction

35 Sense of Community Sidewalks, like fences, make good neighbors. Eyes on the street (people on the sidewalk) impacts public safety. Complete Street Impact

36 Complete Streets Policy

37 Complete Streets: State and National Activity Holly Madill Complete Streets Project Coordinator Michigan Department of Community Health

38 National & State Advocates

39 Policies Nationwide

40 Complete Streets State Policy Action Team County Road Association of Michigan Crim Fitness Foundation League of Michigan Bicyclists Michigan Association of Counties Michigan Association of Planning Michigan Department of Community Health Michigan Department of Transportation Michigan Environmental Council Michigan Fitness Foundation Michigan Municipal League Michigan Recreation and Park Association Michigan State Housing Development Authority Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance Seven Local Community Grant Sites YOU

41 Local Policies

42 Overview of the MDCH Program State Level Policy MDCH County Health Departments City of Detroit City of East Lansing City of Jackson Marquette Township City of Saline Cities of Flint & Linden City of Houghton Healthy Kids, Healthy Michigan Individual Members

43 State-Level Complete Streets Policy Defines CS Mandates consultation & notification at all levels Mandates use of best practices STC to adopt a CS policy for MDOT, develop model CS for localities MDOT/locals need to consult/ agree on CS in 5-year program TA from STC/MDOT Allows localities to enter maintenance agreements establishes Advisory Council Expands definition of street to include all users and modes Enables CS as a portion of local master plan Transportation improvements in a plan take into account local context and all users Means for implementing transportation elements in cooperation with CRC or MDOT PA 135: MDOT PA 134: local planning laws

44 Thank you!

45 Complete Streets Resolutions City of Jackson Jackson County Region II Plannning Commission “that bicycling and walking accommodations using the latest design standards should be a routine part of the agency’s planning, design, construction, maintenance, and operating activities, and will be included in the everyday operations of our transportation system.” Complete Streets Policy

46 Why do we need a local ordinance? 1.More “teeth” than a resolution. 2.Define specific strategies and actions that will support Complete Streets. 3.Assign responsibility for follow-through 4.Positions our community for potential funding and project coordination opportunities. 1.Federal emphasis on Livable Communities 2.State law requires MDOT to work with local Complete Streets policies. 3.Michigan Transportation budget prioritizes CS communities Complete Streets Policy

47 Ordinance Elements Definition of Complete Streets Commitment to all users in road projects Specific exceptions and documentation requirements Non motorized plan (establish or update) –Often the missing piece Funding –Increase gas tax (Act 51) funding money directed to non motorized projects. Complete Streets Policy

48 Complete Streets Ordinance Examples Complete Streets Policy IT SHALL BE A GOAL OF THE CITY TO FUND ADEQUATELY THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NON-MOTORIZED NETWORK PLAN, WHICH SHALL INCLUDE TARGETING AT LEAST FIVE PERCENT OF STATE ACT 51 FUNDS RECEIVED BY THE CITY ANNUALLY IN FURTHERANCE OF THE PLAN’S IMPLEMENTATION.

49 Non motorized transportation plan Department level policies Establish a Complete Streets Advisory Committee City County Intergovernmental agreements regarding road projects. Complete Streets Policy Other policy options

50 Next Steps & Getting Involved 1.Walkable Communities Task Force / Complete Streets Coalition identify components of ordinance. 2.Review ordinance language with legal department 3.Continue public education and build support. 4.Introduce ordinance to City Council 5.Use Ordinance as a model for other Jackson County governments. Complete Streets Policy

51 Resources N-Plan Complete Streets Factsheet N-Plan Complete Streets Model Policy National Complete Streets Resources Michigan Complete Streets Resources Resource

52 Thank you!


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