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S-200 INITIAL ATTACK INCIDENT COMMANDER TYPE 4 Course Objectives A. Gather essential data about the fire and lead the initial attack resources to the.

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Presentation on theme: "S-200 INITIAL ATTACK INCIDENT COMMANDER TYPE 4 Course Objectives A. Gather essential data about the fire and lead the initial attack resources to the."— Presentation transcript:

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2 S-200 INITIAL ATTACK INCIDENT COMMANDER TYPE 4

3 Course Objectives A. Gather essential data about the fire and lead the initial attack resources to the fire. B. Size up the fire, plan the strategy and tactics with the available resources. C. Communicate information to the designated officer.

4 Course Objectives D. Brief and deploy initial attack resources and make adjustments to the plan when necessary. E. Maintain adequate records and participate in post fire activities with designated officer..

5 Introductory Unit 1. Introduction of instructors and students. 2. Discuss the Administrative requirements for the course. 3. Review the roles and duties of the Incident Commander, Type 4.

6 Unit 1 Readiness and Mobilization Discuss what items you would assemble in an Incident Commander’s kit. Develop a checklist that the ICT4 could use for gathering data about the fire. Describe actions you would take to ensure that you and your suppression forces are ready and fully equipped for dispatch to a fire.

7 Unit 1 Describe what you would do and look out for while en route to the fire. Describe safety precautions for traveling to a fire. Describe procedures you would take if you are not able to immediately locate the fire..

8 Initial Attack IC Kit Agency specific form Fireline Handbook ICS Incident Briefing, ICS Form 201

9 Initial Attack IC Kit Check-In, ICS Form 211 General Message Form fire, ICS Form 213

10 Initial Attack IC Kit Unit log, ICS form 214 Office supplies Checklist of information to be gathered about the fire prior to leaving for the fire.

11 Initial Attack IC Kit Incident specific reference materials, maps, photos, etc. List of local radio frequencies and pertinent phone numbers (phone directories) Radio batteries

12 Initial Attack IC Kit Belt weather kit Flagging First aid kit and procedures Notebook, others?..

13 INITIAL ATTACK DATA CHECKLIST Location Ownership Access ( and report to incoming forces ) Size at initial attack

14 INITIAL ATTACK DATA CHECKLIST Smoke column color, direction smoke is traveling and if smoke is laid out flat on ground or going straight up. Fire behavior Fuels- what is burning in and where is it going.

15 INITIAL ATTACK DATA CHECKLIST Terrain Weather- current as well as expected. Values at risk- structures, livestock, watersheds, lives, equipment, etc. Known hazards

16 INITIAL ATTACK DATA CHECKLIST Situations that could slow the initial attack forces. Resources considerations ( cultural, environmental, natural) that limit suppression activities. Traffic exiting from the area.

17 INITIAL ATTACK DATA CHECKLIST Citizens in the area How or who reported the fire- anonymous, 911, etc. ( need for fire investigation)..

18 Unit 2 Size-up, Planning, and Ordering 1. List six items that should be considered in the initial size-up of a fire. 2. Locate the origin, determine the cause and protect the scene. 3. Describe elements to consider in initial attack planning.

19 Unit 2 4. Discuss the information you would provide home base (dispatch) after your size-up and planning a fire. 5. Describe local ordering procedures and the importance of completeness and timeliness in ordering resources.

20 Unit 2 Discuss ways of assessing incident complexity level versus skill level..

21 SIZING UP A FIRE Hazard to firefighters Topography Equipment Fuels Snags Changing weather Biological Urban interface

22 SIZING UP A FIRE Rates of spread Size of fire Current and predicted weather and observations Values at risk

23 SIZE UP OF FIRE Fire behavior Fire Safety –LOOKOUTS –COMMUNICATIONS –ESCAPE ROUTES –SAFETY ZONES..

24 ITEMS NEEDED FOR DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPRESSION STRATEGY Tactics (discuss local strategy & tactics) Resource limitation Resources assignments Support needs

25 DEVELOPMENT OF STRATAGY Safety information Size of fire ( discuss how to make size estimate) Fuels Weather - current and predicted

26 DEVELOPMENT OF STRATEGY Topography - accessibility, safety, effects Natural barriers Human made barriers

27 DEVELOPMENT OF STRATEGY Values at risk (life, property, resources) Fire intensity –direct –parallel –indirect..

28 ORDERING PROCEDURES Develop a list and consolidate orders for supplies and resources prior to requesting. –Don’t order every 5 minutes Order in a timely manner. Proper lead time –Don’t place an order and expect it to be there the next minute. Prioritize orders needed.

29 ORDERING PROCEDURES Support needs for ordered resources –When ordering resources, i.e., a crew, ensure that all items needed to support that crew are also ordered, such as, transportation, food, water, tools, etc.

30 ORDERING PROCEDURES Document what is ordered. What time was it ordered. –Make sure you write down what was ordered and the time order was placed. ( unit log, ICS 214, or incident briefing, ICS 201 ) Required time and the location to include where orders are to be delivered.

31 ORDERING PROCEDURES Correct terminology for items. –Know the correct name of the items that are being ordered, if possible, give the National Fire Equipment System number with the order.

32 ORDERING PROCEDURES Follow up on orders with dispatch –If the items don’t show up in a reasonable amount of time, call dispatch to find out why the order hasn’t arrived. Follow agency guidelines..

33 Unit 3 Deployment and Containment 1. Describe what items you would cover in your briefing. 2. Describe your actions for directing and maintaining control of suppression forces on a fire. 3. Give four factors that need to be monitored on a fire to ensure safe and effective control of fire perimeters.

34 Unit 3 Deployment and Containment 4. Describe some situations that would require special precautions and give usual action taken. 5. Discuss the need for and the items of information the ICT4 provides to their supervisor or designated officer during suppression action. 6. Describe actions you would take if the fire escaped initial attack or cannot be contained within your established objectives.

35 Unit 3 Deployment and Containment 7. Describe what interim actions you take if you are to be relieved by another IC within a certain period of time. 8. Complete Incident Briefing, ICS 201..

36 BRIEFING OF RESOURCES INCIDENT ACTION PLAN Incident objectives -Resources -Priority of attack -Limits/restrictions -Times by which objectives should be completed -Coordination of attack forces

37 BRIEFING of RESOURCES - IAP Strategy –Plan for meeting these objectives Tactics –The way in which plan and objectives will be accomplished.

38 BRIEFING of RESOURCES - IAP Safety principles –Incorporate LCES and 18 Watch Out Situations –Hazards Fuel and Topography Weather, current and predicted

39 BRIEFING of RESOURCES - IAP Anticipate fire behavior Minimum Impact Suppression Tactics Radio Frequencies Suppression forces already on the line –Their work assignments/status..

40 GROUP EXERCISE MAINTAIN CONTROL ASSIGN RESPONSIBILITY USE ICS (ORGANIZATION) POSITIONS PRACTICE GOOD LEADERSHIP

41 PRINCIPLES THAT NEED TO BE DETERMINED BEFORE ESTABLISHING PRIORITIES DURING THE TRANSITION PERIOD. Control of resources –Prevent risk taking by reducing the perception of an environment where personnel believe that they have to risk life to suppress the fire. Safety of resources –Identify all hazards and notify all fire personnel of the hazards.

42 PRINCIPLES THAT NEED TO BE DETERMINED BEFORE ESTABLISHING PRIORITIES DURING THE TRANSITION PERIOD. Continue suppression efforts while re evaluating strategy and tactics. Maintain good communications. –Find an area away from the fire where good communications can be established –Delegate a radio operator

43 PRINCIPLES THAT NEED TO BE DETERMINED BEFORE ESTABLISHING PRIORITIES DURING THE TRANSITION PERIOD. Determine values at risk in relation to suppression tactics. Make sure that your tactics are not putting the suppression forces at risk –One foot in the black –LCES –Look Up/ Look Down/ Look Around –18 Watch Out/ 10 Standard Fire Orders Ensure that all resources know the identity of the new IC..

44 BRIEF AND PROVIDE COMPLETE RECORDS TO RELIEF, WHEN APPROPRIATE Fire situation past and present Personnel on fire Equipment on fire Additional resources you have ordered and expect to receive.

45 BRIEF AND PROVIDE COMPLETE RECORDS TO RELIEF, WHEN APPROPRIATE Progress of resources Additional needs, problems and concerns Hazards and how you have corrected them Access routes Helispots

46 BRIEF AND PROVIDE COMPLETE RECORDS TO RELIEF, WHEN APPROPRIATE Possible location for camp, if needed. Complete ICS Form 201 and go over with new IC. What is the continuing role of the ICT4 after relief?..

47 GROUP EXERCISE DEVIL FISH LAKE FIRE STWB- PG. 24

48 Unit 4 Control, Mop-up and Management 1. Describe the actions you would take after containment to ensure the security of control lines in various fire situations. 2. Describe situations that the IC may experience in dealing with non-fire personnel at the fire.

49 Unit 4 Control, Mop-up and Management 3. Describe how incidents and injuries should be treated on a fire. 4. Discuss four examples when priority setting is required during a fire action.

50 Unit 4 Control, Mop-up and Management 5. Describe what fire actions might require designated officer’s consent before proceeding. 6. Discuss how and when subordinate fire personnel might receive additional training skills during a suppression action.

51 Unit 4 Control, Mop-up and Management 7. Describe how to determine whether fires in various fuels are safe to leave. 8. Discuss the procedures that are often taken to rehabilitate damage and cleanup. 9. Discuss readiness of suppression forces for next assignment..

52 ENSURE CONTAINMENT AND SECURITY OF CONTROL LINES Burn out fingers and islands near lines. Cold trail inside firelines where appropriate. Tear up and extinguish berms and piles. Fall snags near the line. Mop up inside perimeter for some distance. Use infrared heat detector if available. Patrol lines, especially through heat of day

53 NON-FIRE PERSONNEL THAT IC MAY HAVE TO DEAL WITH Local landowners and users News media Cooperator fire protection and resource agencies

54 NON-FIRE PERSONNEL THAT IC MAY HAVE TO DEAL WITH Environmentalist Children and Bystanders Aircraft traffic Land Managers..

55 Accidents and Injuries on a Fire Determine the extent and seriousness of injuries. –Administer first aid –Evacuate or transport serious injuries –Assign a crewmember to watch injured person Document incidents. –Complete proper CA or agency specific forms.

56 Accidents and Injuries on a Fire Request investigator for more serious accidents and injuries. Ensure follow-up examination and/or treatment of all injuries. Keep designated officer informed..

57 FIRE ACTIONS THAT MIGHT REQUIRE DESIGNATED OFFICER’S CONSENT Non-routine actions on cooperators’ lands * Contract or agreement Using heavy equipment Using retardant Requests from non-fire personnel *Resource managers *Land owners *Other individuals..

58 FIRE ACTIONS THAT MIGHT REQUIRE DESIGNATED OFFICER’S CONSENT Non-routine actions on cooperators’ lands Contract or Agreement Using mechanized equipment

59 Fire Actions That Might Require Designated Officer’s Consent Using retardant –Riparian/water areas –Cost versus resources values –Around improvements of any value Requests from non-fire personnel –Resource Managers –Land owners –Other individuals

60 YOU CAN PUT SUBORDINATES IN TRAINING POSITIONS WHEN: The fire is controlled. Training activities will not jeopardize the security of the fire or safety of personnel and equipment and there are no apparent hazards.

61 YOU CAN PUT SUBORDINATES IN TRAINING POSITIONS WHEN: When training is authorized by supervisor and/or the ICT4 When activities are planned, supervised, and documented. Task Books Qualified personnel over see the performance..

62 Unit 5 Administrative Requirements 1. List the kinds of information that must be noted or recorded for administrative needs during fire suppression activities. 2. Discuss the administrative requirements for using various types of equipment on a fire: agency, rental and cooperator.

63 Unit 5 Administrative Requirements 3. Provide necessary data to complete an individual fire report. 4. Describe the ICT 4’s responsibility for personnel, tools, equipment and supplies on a fire 5. Describe the ICT 4’s administrative responsibilities when relieved by another IC on the fire.

64 Unit 5 Administrative Requirements 6. Describe the ICT 4’s responsibilities for informing fire management personnel as top resource values threatened or lost and possible rehabilitation needs to the fire area..

65 INFORMATION THAT MUST BE NOTED OR RECORDED DURING FIRE Individual fire report information Personnel time Performance time

66 INFORMATION THAT MUST BE NOTED OR RECORDED DURING FIRE Equipment forms –Inspections –Use and time –Vehicle use records –Completed contracts, rental agreements Fire trespass information

67 INFORMATION THAT MUST BE NOTED OR RECORDED DURING FIRE Accident forms ( personnel, equipment ) –CA forms –Agency specific forms Property loss damage Procurement issues

68 INFORMATION THAT MUST BE NOTED OR RECORDED DURING FIRE Sensitive issues –Priority setting in high value areas –Other local concerns –Any agency specific forms, reports, or records..

69 ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR USING EQUIPMENT ON A FIRE Agency Equipment –Request through dispatcher –Complete use records –Manage credit card use –Complete accident report forms –Complete anyagency specific forms

70 ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR USING EQUIPMENT ON A FIRE Rental Equipment –Request through dispatch/order number –Inspect equipment –Check for rental agreement and condition –Maintain records –Document accidents –Document claims –Evaluate

71 ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR USING EQUIPMENT ON A FIRE Cooperator Equipment –Check with dispatch for cooperative agreement –Keep use records –Inspect equipment –Document accidents and damage..

72 INDIVIDUAL FIRE REPORT INFORMATION NAME NUMBER ESTIMATED SIZE LOCATION (LEGAL, LON/LAT, UTM)

73 INDIVIDUAL FIRE REPORT INFORMATION FUEL TYPES/ADJACENT FUELS SLOPE TIMES- on scene, attack, containment, control, out, special incidents.

74 INDIVIDUAL FIRE REPORT INFORMATION CAUSE- Causal agents, evidence, witnesses, etc. COSTS- Supplies, food, contracts, salaries, rehabilitation, etc SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS- Historical sites, reservations, wildlife habitat..

75 ADMINISTRATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES WHEN IC T4 is RELIEVED Brief relief on actions taken –resources on the fire –resources en route –general situation –problems

76 ADMINISTRATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES WHEN ICT 4 is RELIEVED Bring all administrative forms and records up to date. –Timesheets –Equipment agreements/times –Evaluations –Injuries NOTIFY DISPATCH WHEN RELIEVED..

77 Unit 6 Post Fire Evaluation 1. Discuss the topics normally covered in post fire critiques. 2. Discuss the areas of performance in subordinate's work activities that normally would be evaluated. 3. Discuss the ICT 4’s role in identifying training needs for subordinates and self.


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