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Civil Air Patrol Semper Vigilans Part One Introduction to the Organization.

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Presentation on theme: "Civil Air Patrol Semper Vigilans Part One Introduction to the Organization."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Civil Air Patrol Semper Vigilans Part One Introduction to the Organization

3 Missions of C.A.P Vision StatementVision Statement Mission StatementMission Statement HistoryHistory Missions of Civil Air PatrolMissions of Civil Air Patrol Organization of Civil Air PatrolOrganization of Civil Air Patrol

4 Vision Statement Civil Air Patrol, America’s Air Force Auxiliary, building the nation’s finest force of citizen volunteers…performing Missions for America.

5 Mission Statement To serve America by developing our Nation’s youth; accomplishing local, state and national missions; and educating our citizens to ensure air and space supremacy.

6 History The Beginning Gill Robb WilsonGill Robb Wilson –Noted writer/ assignment in Germany –New Jersey Civil Defense Formation of Civil Air PatrolFormation of Civil Air Patrol –December 1, 1941 –MG John Francis Curry/Gill Rob Wilson –Administrative Order #9

7 History During WWI Initial mission recon later included bombs Initial mission recon later included bombs Coastal patrols and submarine watch Coastal patrols and submarine watch –Experimental patrolling plan for 90 days. – Established three bases Patrols went out to sea as far as 150 miles. Patrols went out to sea as far as 150 miles. – The first CAP "kill" went to Cpt Johnnie Haggins and Maj Wynant Farr. – Experiment lasted 18 months & 21 bases – 86,685 missions/244,600 hours flown – 26 members were killed and 7 seriously injured. Also, 90 aircraft were lost

8 History After War After the coastal patrol ended After the coastal patrol ended – Search and rescue for down military and civilian pilots and planes – Teams on horses, foot, vehicles, and a planned parachute team that never executed – Moved over 3.5 million pounds of mail and cargo for the air forces – Texas and Arizona border that was responsible – Pulling aerial targets, running search light patrols and wolf depopulation patrols

9 History Public Law 476 Public Law 476 signed July 1, ) Inform the general public about aviation 2) Provide seniors and cadets flight training 3) Provide air service for emergencies 4) Establish radio network training/emergency 5) Encourage the establishment of flying clubs 6) Provide selected cadets a two week camp 7) Provide selected cadets flight scholarships 8) Encourage model airplane building 9) Assist veterans to find employment 10) Contribute services to special projects

10 History Public Law 557 May 26, 1948 Official Auxiliary USAFMay 26, 1948 Official Auxiliary USAF Continental Air Command 1959Continental Air Command 1959 USAF HQ 1968USAF HQ 1968 Air University Command (Maxwell) 1976Air University Command (Maxwell) 1976

11 Missions of C.A.P Emergency ServicesEmergency Services Cadet ProgramsCadet Programs Aerospace EducationAerospace Education –Internal –External –O’Flights

12 Missions of C.A.P Emergency Services Ground TeamsGround Teams –Disaster support(Humanitarian) –Missing/downed people and aircraft –Emergency Communication AircrewAircrew –Cooperate/ Private owned aircraft Counter narcoticsCounter narcotics Arial surveyArial survey –Disasters (VIPs) TransportTransport –Assist Red Cross and other agencies Air Force supportAir Force support

13 Missions of C.A.P Emergency Services Ground TeamGround Team Administrative SupportAdministrative Support Communications SupportCommunications Support Flight Line ActivitiesFlight Line Activities Mission Flight CrewMission Flight Crew

14 Missions of C.A.P Cadet Programs Aerospace TrainingAerospace Training –Flight academies –O flights –Text books (support school knowledge) LeadershipLeadership –Academies/ schools –Text books –OJT Other BenefitsOther Benefits

15 Missions of C.A.P Aerospace Education Orientation FlightsOrientation Flights Model Airplane BuildingModel Airplane Building Model RocketryModel Rocketry Flight TrainingFlight Training Orientation About Aerospace CareersOrientation About Aerospace Careers

16 Organization of C.A.P National and Regional OfficesNational and Regional Offices Relationship between CAP and USAFRelationship between CAP and USAF Region and Wing Liaison OfficesRegion and Wing Liaison Offices

17 Civil Air Patrol National Board National CommanderNational Commander National Vice CommanderNational Vice Commander Chief of StaffChief of Staff Legal OfficerLegal Officer Finance OfficerFinance Officer Senior Air Force AdvisorSenior Air Force Advisor 8 Region Commanders8 Region Commanders 52 Wing Commanders52 Wing Commanders

18 National Executive Committee National CommanderNational Commander National Vice CommanderNational Vice Commander Chief of StaffChief of Staff Legal OfficerLegal Officer Finance OfficerFinance Officer Senior Air Force AdvisorSenior Air Force Advisor 8 Region Commanders8 Region Commanders

19 HQ CAP Corporate Offices Executive DirectorExecutive Director Mission SupportMission Support General CounselGeneral Counsel Plans & RequirementsPlans & Requirements Aerospace Education & TrainingAerospace Education & Training Cadet ProgramsCadet Programs PersonnelPersonnel

20 HQ CAP Corporate Offices (cont) Financial ManagementFinancial Management Marketing & Public RelationsMarketing & Public Relations OperationsOperations CAP BookstoreCAP Bookstore CAP Supply DepotCAP Supply Depot

21 CAP-USAF Offices CommanderCommander Vice CommanderVice Commander Information ManagementInformation Management Financial ManagementFinancial Management Chaplain ServicesChaplain Services Inspector GeneralInspector General Staff Judge AdvocateStaff Judge Advocate

22 CAP-USAF Offices (cont) LogisticsLogistics Aerospace Education & Cadet ProgramsAerospace Education & Cadet Programs Public AffairsPublic Affairs SafetySafety OperationsOperations

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24 CAP Field Organization 8 Regions8 Regions 52 Wings52 Wings GroupsGroups SquadronsSquadrons FlightsFlights

25 CAP Squadrons Composite SquadronComposite Squadron Cadet SquadronCadet Squadron Senior SquadronSenior Squadron CongressionalCongressional PatronPatron

26 CAP Chain of Command CAP HeadquartersCAP Headquarters Your RegionYour Region –Region Commander Your WingYour Wing –Wing Commander Your GroupYour Group –Group Commander Your SquadronYour Squadron –Squadron Commander Your FlightYour Flight

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28 Civil Air Patrol Semper Vigilans Part Two Introduction to Followership (LL CH.1)

29 Duties and Responsibilities Element MemberElement Member –Part of flight formation –Part of drill formation Learn basic drill movementsLearn basic drill movements Learn how to reportLearn how to report Learn how to fall into unit formationsLearn how to fall into unit formations Keep alertKeep alert ObserveObserve Keep an open mind on how to do betterKeep an open mind on how to do better

30 Reading and Tutoring Techniques Read the text at your own paceRead the text at your own pace Ask Questions of older cadets and seniorsAsk Questions of older cadets and seniors You are responsible to ask questionYou are responsible to ask question The senior/cadet member tutor will help you to understand the key concepts of the textThe senior/cadet member tutor will help you to understand the key concepts of the text IIEIIE

31 Aspects of Followership Respect for Authority AttitudeIntegrityListeningSelf-DisciplineRAILS

32 There must be people to assure essential things are done. Regulations Orders From superiors Abusing authority can get you dismissed (2B)

33 Attitude Understand why regulations exist Accept the judgment of superiors Think positively when approaching any task

34 Integrity Strict adherence to a code of conduct Apply to yourself first Treating others with respect Gain self respect selflessness

35 Self-discipline Doing what needs to be done without being told It is a mindset and way of life Required to reach goals

36 Listening Keep an open mind Listen to understand Listen to message not speaker’s ability Take notes Eye contact Positive attitude Credit source of good ideas

37 Self management Study Habits Tips for Studying (pg 8 of text) Reading Skills Identification – shorten the theme in one sentence Interpretation – search for the author’s meaning Evaluation – decide the important points of the chapter

38 Civil Air Patrol Missions Aerospace Education Internalexternal Cadet program Emergency services Search and rescue Homeland security Disaster relief Assist other agencies

39 Chain of Command Order of authority Wiring Diagram (pg 11 in text) Insignias pgs in text

40 Cadet Insignias

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42 Senior Member Insignias

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44 Customs and courtesies Customs – politeness Courtesies – proper conduct ReportingEntranceReportDeparture

45 Image AppearanceUniformGroomingPostureSpeechConduct addressing superiors Drills

46 Drill Commands StationaryAttention Hand salute Present arms Order arms Parade rest At ease Rest About face Right (left) face Right eye Ready front Marching Forward march Quick time Double time Mark time Half step halt Right (left) step Change step To the rear Right (left) flank To the Rear

47 Civil Air Patrol Semper Vigilans Part Three Introduction to Drill AFMAN

48 Introduction to Drill and Ceremonies Lesson ObjectiveLesson Objective –Know the importance of drill and ceremonies. Samples of BehaviorSamples of Behavior –State the importance of Drill and ceremonies. –List the symbols that represent the leaders of the flight squadron. –List all the basic military drill terms.

49 Introduction to Drill and Ceremonies OVERVIEW ScopeScope Introduction to DrillIntroduction to Drill Introduction to CeremoniesIntroduction to Ceremonies Key to SymbolsKey to Symbols Explanation of TermsExplanation of Terms Drill InstructionDrill Instruction

50 Introduction to Drill and Ceremonies SymbolsSymbols

51 Introduction to Drill and Ceremonies FormationsFormations

52 Introduction to Drill and Ceremonies FileFile

53 Introduction to Drill and Ceremonies RankRank

54 Introduction to Drill and Ceremonies Drill InstructionDrill Instruction –Step by step procedures for teaching drill movements. –By the numbers.

55 Commands and the Command Voice Lesson ObjectiveLesson Objective –Know basic commands and characteristics of the command voice. Samples of BehaviorSamples of Behavior –Identify the types of commands used during the basic military drill movements. –Identify the necessary qualities of the command voice. –Define cadence.

56 Commands and the Command Voice Overview CommandsCommands –Types of Commands –General Rules for Commands The Command VoiceThe Command Voice –Voice Characteristics –Cadence –Counting Cadence –Mass Commands

57 Commands and the Command Voice CommandsCommands –Types of Commands Drill CommandsDrill Commands Supplementary CommandsSupplementary Commands Informational CommandsInformational Commands –General Rules for Commands

58 Commands and the Command Voice The Command VoiceThe Command Voice –Voice Characteristics LoudnessLoudness ProjectionProjection DistinctivenessDistinctiveness InflectionInflection SnapSnap

59 Commands and the Command Voice CommandsCommands –Types of Commands Drill CommandsDrill Commands Supplementary CommandsSupplementary Commands Informational CommandsInformational Commands Preparatory CommandsPreparatory Commands Execution CommandsExecution Commands –General Rules for Commands

60 Commands and the Command Voice The Command VoiceThe Command Voice –Voice Characteristics LoudnessLoudness ProjectionProjection DistinctivenessDistinctiveness InflectionInflection SnapSnap

61 Commands and the Command Voice Diaphragm ExerciseDiaphragm Exercise

62 Commands and the Command Voice Commands Portrayed GraphicallyCommands Portrayed Graphically

63 Commands and the Command Voice CadenceCadence Counting CadenceCounting Cadence Mass CommandsMass Commands

64 Individual Instruction Lesson ObjectiveLesson Objective –Perform basic drill positions and movements. Sample of BehaviorSample of Behavior –Execute various movements and positions of basic drill when given the command to do so.

65 Individual Instruction Overview Positions and MovementsPositions and Movements Positions of AttentionPositions of Attention Rest PositionsRest Positions Facing MovementsFacing Movements Hand SaluteHand Salute Exchange of SalutesExchange of Salutes Present Arms and Order ArmsPresent Arms and Order Arms Eyes Right (Left) and Ready FrontEyes Right (Left) and Ready Front Steps and MarchingSteps and Marching Forward March and HaltForward March and Halt Double TimeDouble Time Mark TimeMark Time Half StepHalf Step Right (Left) StepRight (Left) Step Change StepChange Step To the Rear MarchTo the Rear March Flanking MovementFlanking Movement Face in MarchingFace in Marching Marching Other than at AttentionMarching Other than at Attention

66 Individual Instruction Positions and MovementsPositions and Movements

67 Individual Instruction Position of AttentionPosition of Attention –Bring heels together –Keep legs straight –Body is erect with hips level –Arms hang straight down –Place thumbs along seams of trousers or sides of skirt –Hands are cupped –Head is erect and held straight to the front –Weight of body rests equally on the heels and balls of both feet

68 Individual Instruction Rest PositionsRest Positions –Parade Rest –At Ease –Rest –Fall Out Parade Rest

69 Individual Instruction Facing MovementsFacing Movements –Right (Left) Face

70 Individual Instruction About FaceAbout Face Half Right (Left) FaceHalf Right (Left) Face

71 Individual Instruction Hand SaluteHand Salute –The hand salute is used for training purposes only. –The command is Hand, SALUTE and is performed in two counts.

72 Individual Instruction Exchange of SalutesExchange of Salutes OutdoorsOutdoors IndoorsIndoors In FormationsIn Formations In GroupsIn Groups In Public GatheringsIn Public Gatherings Between military pedestrians and officers in moving military vehiclesBetween military pedestrians and officers in moving military vehicles CiviliansCivilians PrisonersPrisoners Work DetailsWork Details

73 Individual Instruction Present, Arms and Order ArmsPresent, Arms and Order Arms Eyes Right (Left) and Ready FrontEyes Right (Left) and Ready Front

74 Individual Instruction Ready FrontReady Front

75 Individual Instruction Steps and MarchingSteps and Marching Forward March and HaltForward March and Halt

76 Individual Instruction Double Time Quick Time

77 Individual Instruction Mark TimeMark Time –The command is Mark Time, MARCH. –Mark Time is executed in quick time only. –Toe height is 4 inches off the ground.

78 Individual Instruction Half StepHalf Step –The command is Half Step, MARCH. –12 inch steps at quick time

79 Individual Instruction Right (Left) StepRight (Left) Step –The Command is Right (Left) Step, MARCH. Change StepChange Step –The Command is Change Step, MARCH.

80 Individual Instruction To The Rear MarchTo The Rear March –The Command is To the Rear, MARCH.

81 Individual Instruction Flanking MovementFlanking Movement –The Command is Right (Left) Flank, MARCH.

82 Individual Instruction Face in MarchingFace in Marching –The Command is Right (Left) Flank, MARCH. Marching Other Than at AttentionMarching Other Than at Attention –The only command that can be given when marching other than attention is Incline to the Right (Left). Route Step MarchRoute Step March –The Command is Route Step, MARCH. At Ease MarchAt Ease March –The Command is At Ease, March.

83 Review Part one - The OrganizationPart one - The Organization Part two - Leadership Lab Chapter onePart two - Leadership Lab Chapter one Part three – Basic DrillPart three – Basic Drill Questions?Questions?


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