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Source: OCP-IP “The Importance of Infrastructure Supporting Open Standards in Electronic Design” Ian R. Mackintosh Chairman and President, OCP-IP (CANDE.

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Presentation on theme: "Source: OCP-IP “The Importance of Infrastructure Supporting Open Standards in Electronic Design” Ian R. Mackintosh Chairman and President, OCP-IP (CANDE."— Presentation transcript:

1 Source: OCP-IP “The Importance of Infrastructure Supporting Open Standards in Electronic Design” Ian R. Mackintosh Chairman and President, OCP-IP (CANDE 9/21-23, B.C., Canada)

2 Source OCP-IP 2 Overview- a “snapshot” review Infrastructure “Theory” The Nature of Infrastructure Importance of Infrastructure Creation of Infrastructure Examples Success and Future of Standards Lessons Learned Summary

3 Source OCP-IP 3 Infrastructure “Theory” The infrastructure surrounding (say) a standard evolves through distinct phases with well-defined characteristics 1) Foundation – relating to processes 2) Emergence – from existing processes 3) Growth – from attained critical mass 4) Decline – natural life-cycle

4 Source OCP-IP 4 Infrastructure for Design Standards What is Infrastructure? The surrounding services, tools, technology, products, support and information that complement the standard Importance of Infrastructure: Increases VALUE of Standard SIMPLIFIES adoption: less internal work! Maximizes resource SHARING Lowers COSTS Commoditizes EXPERT knowledge, etc.

5 Source OCP-IP 5 Why Do We Care About Infrastructure? Simplifies adoption decision Accelerates usage Reduces risk of standard fragmentation Maximizes industry re-use efficiency Grows markets

6 Source OCP-IP 6 Impact of Infrastructure on Industry: Model 1 Source: Mackintosh Model Proprietary/ Closed NATIVE P P P Corporate Growth (Product-centric) Industry Growth (Standard-centric) Best-of-Breed/ Open Proprietary/ Closed WHOLE VALUE ADDED INFRASTRUCTURE S

7 Source OCP-IP 7 Impact of Infrastructure on Industry: Model 2 Source: Mackintosh Model Time Corporate Strategy $ TAM Infrastructure Whole Value Added Native Available Market as Function of Corporate Strategy

8 Source OCP-IP 8 How Do Standards Evolve? TWO primary mechanisms The most “fit”/absent competition (Intel/PCI, GDS II, etc.) Forced feeding (OCP-IP, Si2, SPIRIT, VSIA, etc.) Infrastructure and Adoption are co-dependent True “chicken-and-egg” “Infrastructure begets usage and vice versa.”

9 Source OCP-IP 9 A Proven Method for Driving Infrastructure Unless you have a “lock” on compelling and essential technology you will need… A community: sharing contributions Focused activity: Central organization – neutral! Resource commitment – different ways Structure – working groups Communication – promotional, too!

10 Source OCP-IP 10 OPTIMAL Organizational Focus Source: Mackintosh Model Amount of Infrastructure (from ORG.) OCP-IP # of Standards (from ORG.) Many standards/ORG., likely means “paper-only” If large infrastructure required, likely need sharper focus/few standards IEEE 1

11 Source OCP-IP 11 Example Organizations in Electronic Design Space The familiar protagonists: IEEE OCP-IP PCI Si2 SPIRIT USB VSIA…, etc. Representing diverse: Methods of standards creation Time-to-market Success Organization and operational structures, etc.

12 Source OCP-IP 12 Why Do Standards Succeed or Fail? Communication effectiveness: value/benefits/facts Ease of adoption Actual value (standard + infrastructure) Timing NIH/Protectionism Compulsion: is it mandatory? FUD density (from competition) ROI Adopter diversity…. so each item above requires serious attention!

13 Source OCP-IP 13 Overcoming the Challenges for Adoption Understand Identify liabilities specific to the standard Build Infrastructure Optimized for the liability-set One-size does NOT fit all Communicate Value/benefits/facts must be visible A PROFOUND challenge!

14 Source OCP-IP 14 Communicating Infrastructure: OCP-IP Example

15 Source OCP-IP 15 Communicating Benefits: OCP-IP SLDWG Output July 2003 Sept 2003 Dec 2003 Feb 2004 May 2004 Oct 2004 Feb 2005 July 2005 March 2006 April 2006 Aug 2004 Monitors introduced a OCP-IP 2.0 supported OCP-IP 2.1 supported TL3 channel introduced May 2006 Checkers introduced Adapters introduced Regular Releases Features constantly being added Backward compatibility maintained Support for OCP-IP delivered Already planning future releases. Regular Releases Features constantly being added Backward compatibility maintained Support for OCP-IP delivered Already planning future releases. Examples package released

16 Source OCP-IP 16 Some Key Lessons for Success with Standards Prolific adoption requires substantial value/infrastructure Infrastructure should be driven in all cases Infrastructure is standard-specific Adoption liabilities are standard-specific Standards bodies must be tailored to infrastructure needs Standards are “products”- communication and sales are critical components A promising Standard is first a “Whole Product” Neither standards nor infrastructure is FREE Motivation and leadership: need be balanced and channeled

17 Source OCP-IP 17 Summary Standards require infrastructure to proliferate Mature industries are centered around standards Numerous and diverse pitfalls normally compromise a standard’s success Adoption of standards is very mixed in the electronic design space Liabilities standards might encounter can be predicted and minimized by infrastructure There is little adoption without actual AND well- communicated VALUE

18 Source: OCP-IP “The Importance of Infrastructure Supporting Open Standards in Electronic Design” Ian R. Mackintosh Chairman and President, OCP-IP (CANDE 9/21-23, B.C., Canada)


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