Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Schools and Parents: Raising Good Kids Together Coast Episcopal School Faculty November 2008 Coast Episcopal School Faculty November 2008.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Schools and Parents: Raising Good Kids Together Coast Episcopal School Faculty November 2008 Coast Episcopal School Faculty November 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Schools and Parents: Raising Good Kids Together Coast Episcopal School Faculty November 2008 Coast Episcopal School Faculty November 2008

2 “Good Kids” have: Components of Moral Life Empathy Conscience Altruism Moral Reasoning Empathy Conscience Altruism Moral Reasoning

3 these slides at: these slides at:

4 45-minute Plan no calling higher than yours work on “character” is worth it parent-school collaboration increases success 5 practices for schools practical steps for implementation two stories and encouragement no calling higher than yours work on “character” is worth it parent-school collaboration increases success 5 practices for schools practical steps for implementation two stories and encouragement

5 Three Key Studies Berkowitz & Bier (2005), What Works in Character Education (33 programs) Catalano et al. (2002), Positive Youth Development (77 programs) Benninga et al. (2003), Relation of Character Education Implementation and Academic Achievement in Elementary Schools (681 schools) Berkowitz & Bier (2005), What Works in Character Education (33 programs) Catalano et al. (2002), Positive Youth Development (77 programs) Benninga et al. (2003), Relation of Character Education Implementation and Academic Achievement in Elementary Schools (681 schools)

6 What Works in Character Education Marvin W. Berkowitz & Melinda Bier, CEP, 2005 Findings  We can help children be kinder, more thoughtful  Effects go beyond the program goals  “there is ample evidence that character education improves academic performance”  Results last at least a few years Findings  We can help children be kinder, more thoughtful  Effects go beyond the program goals  “there is ample evidence that character education improves academic performance”  Results last at least a few years

7 What Works in Character Education Marvin W. Berkowitz & Melinda Bier, CEP, 2005 Components of Good Programs  Make the agenda explicit (decide what you want)  Involvement beyond the school (families!)  Provide models (live, literary, historical)  Integrate into the curriculum  Use multi-strategy approach (peer interaction, direct teaching, professional development) Components of Good Programs  Make the agenda explicit (decide what you want)  Involvement beyond the school (families!)  Provide models (live, literary, historical)  Integrate into the curriculum  Use multi-strategy approach (peer interaction, direct teaching, professional development)

8 What Works in Character Education Marvin W. Berkowitz & Melinda Bier, CEP, 2005 Effective Program Strategies  Explicit agenda (preach & practice)  Provide Models and Mentors  Peer Interaction  Skill Training  Family Involvement  Direct Teaching  Integration into Curriculum  Professional Development Effective Program Strategies  Explicit agenda (preach & practice)  Provide Models and Mentors  Peer Interaction  Skill Training  Family Involvement  Direct Teaching  Integration into Curriculum  Professional Development

9 Positive Youth Development Richard Catalano et al, 2002  Looked at 161 programs; 77 had evaluation criteria sufficient for analysis; 25 had “important youth outcomes”  96% of effective programs are integrated program into curriculum  Successful programs implemented more than 9 months  60% of effective programs incorporated family component (info, training, implement at home)  Looked at 161 programs; 77 had evaluation criteria sufficient for analysis; 25 had “important youth outcomes”  96% of effective programs are integrated program into curriculum  Successful programs implemented more than 9 months  60% of effective programs incorporated family component (info, training, implement at home)

10 Character Improves Academics Benninga et al., Relation of Character Education Implementation and Academic Achievement in Elementary Schools (2003) 681 schools applying to be “Distinguished Schools” sample matched with other schools correlate with standardized test scores …(small) positive correlations between character education and higher academic scores Benninga et al., Relation of Character Education Implementation and Academic Achievement in Elementary Schools (2003) 681 schools applying to be “Distinguished Schools” sample matched with other schools correlate with standardized test scores …(small) positive correlations between character education and higher academic scores

11 Character Improves Academics Benninga et al., Three criteria characteristic of good character ed programs in elementary schools correlate with higher academic scores ability to ensure clean & secure environment evidence that parents & teachers modeled and promoted good character education quality opportunities for students to contribute in meaningful ways to the school and its community Benninga et al., Three criteria characteristic of good character ed programs in elementary schools correlate with higher academic scores ability to ensure clean & secure environment evidence that parents & teachers modeled and promoted good character education quality opportunities for students to contribute in meaningful ways to the school and its community

12

13 Parenting Experts  Diana Baumrind, Berkeley Family Socialization Project  Marvin W. Berkowitz, Sanford N. McDonnell Professor of Character Education, UMSL  Thomas Lickona, Center for the 4th and 5th Rs (respect and responsibility), SUNY Cortland  Larry Nucci, Center for Moral Development, UIC  Marilyn Watson, National Teacher Education Project, Child Development Project  Diana Baumrind, Berkeley Family Socialization Project  Marvin W. Berkowitz, Sanford N. McDonnell Professor of Character Education, UMSL  Thomas Lickona, Center for the 4th and 5th Rs (respect and responsibility), SUNY Cortland  Larry Nucci, Center for Moral Development, UIC  Marilyn Watson, National Teacher Education Project, Child Development Project

14 Parenting Styles Diana Baumrind, Ph.D. Unengaged Authoritarian Permissive Authoritative (teaching styles, too) Unengaged Authoritarian Permissive Authoritative (teaching styles, too)

15 Parenting Styles DEMANDINGNESS highlow DEMANDINGNESS highlow authoritative permissive authoritarian unengaged high NURTURANCE low

16 Authoritative Style demandingness  set high (but REALISTIC) standards  communicate the standards/expectations  expect standards to be lived up to  monitor whether standards are being met  set high (but REALISTIC) standards  communicate the standards/expectations  expect standards to be lived up to  monitor whether standards are being met 1

17 Authoritative Style nurturance  quick to respond in times of need  provide support, love, encouragement, warmth, tenderness  offer support and involvement needed to meet demands  use disciplinary situations to teach (i.e., low power assertion, physical punishment)  quick to respond in times of need  provide support, love, encouragement, warmth, tenderness  offer support and involvement needed to meet demands  use disciplinary situations to teach (i.e., low power assertion, physical punishment) 1

18 moral reasoning fact: The level of adolescent moral reasoning is predicted positively by authoritative parenting style, negatively by permissive style (THUS: high standards, demands AND high levels of nurturance, support) The level of adolescent moral reasoning is predicted positively by authoritative parenting style, negatively by permissive style (THUS: high standards, demands AND high levels of nurturance, support)

19 Modeling  We are models; we present models  Practice AND Preach  We teach in discussing moral events and our opinions about them  We teach by inviting others in  We are models; we present models  Practice AND Preach  We teach in discussing moral events and our opinions about them  We teach by inviting others in

20 Democratic Decisions/Discussions  Show respect by bringing children into discussions in meaningful ways  Foster belongingness  Teach the skills of negotiation  Teach and demonstrate conflict resolution skills  Show respect by bringing children into discussions in meaningful ways  Foster belongingness  Teach the skills of negotiation  Teach and demonstrate conflict resolution skills

21 Democratic Decision Making This is where the SKILLS of character are practiced (showing others that their opinions are respected; negotiating later conflicts in life)

22 Induction is perhaps the single most powerful parental influence on children’s moral development Marvin W. Berkowitz McDonnell Professor of Character Education,UMSL Induction is perhaps the single most powerful parental influence on children’s moral development Marvin W. Berkowitz McDonnell Professor of Character Education,UMSL

23 Induction entails pointing out the child’s actions and effects, plus… explaining the reasons for parental (or teacher) behavior and its implications for the child and others pointing out the child’s actions and effects, plus… explaining the reasons for parental (or teacher) behavior and its implications for the child and others

24 why the importance of induction? It teaches or reinforces knowledge, with feeling it links the self and others it stimulates understanding of reasons for picking one course of action vs another research links induction to greater empathy more highly developed conscience higher levels of moral reasoning altruism It teaches or reinforces knowledge, with feeling it links the self and others it stimulates understanding of reasons for picking one course of action vs another research links induction to greater empathy more highly developed conscience higher levels of moral reasoning altruism

25 “Good Kids”: Components of Moral Life Empathy Conscience Altruism Moral Reasoning Empathy Conscience Altruism Moral Reasoning

26 10 implementation steps 1. High expectations communicated 2. Expectations monitored, lived up to 3. Highly supportive school community 4. Scaffold support (developmental discipline) 5. Great staff/teacher modeling 1. High expectations communicated 2. Expectations monitored, lived up to 3. Highly supportive school community 4. Scaffold support (developmental discipline) 5. Great staff/teacher modeling

27 10 implementation steps 6. Bring other models in 7. Explain reasons for good and bad 8. Discipline with others in mind 9. Invite meaningful participation 10. Teach negotiation by negotiating 6. Bring other models in 7. Explain reasons for good and bad 8. Discipline with others in mind 9. Invite meaningful participation 10. Teach negotiation by negotiating

28 Practical Suggestions Expectations  Expect partnership  Make sure this is clear at the outset  Define what partnership means  Expect partnership  Make sure this is clear at the outset  Define what partnership means

29 Practical Suggestions Parent Training  Teach general parenting skills (setting limits, negotiating privileges, discipline)  Five practices for goodness  Train for volunteer work in school  Teach general parenting skills (setting limits, negotiating privileges, discipline)  Five practices for goodness  Train for volunteer work in school

30 Practical Suggestions Parent Implementation of Program  Case studies, discussion questions for home  Carrying out what is learned from parent training  Parent-school compacts / contracts  Case studies, discussion questions for home  Carrying out what is learned from parent training  Parent-school compacts / contracts

31 Practical Suggestions Parent-School Compacts/Contracts  compact for academic/behavior expectations  compact for nurturance  compact for athletic or artistic performance  compact for discipline  compact for academic/behavior expectations  compact for nurturance  compact for athletic or artistic performance  compact for discipline

32 Pick an area to work on  Individual work, group work  Marie-Claire’s school  Jim’s story  Individual work, group work  Marie-Claire’s school  Jim’s story

33 Character is a set of feelings, understandings, and skills, plus the disposition to use them in the service of others Character is a set of feelings, understandings, and skills, plus the disposition to use them in the service of others


Download ppt "Schools and Parents: Raising Good Kids Together Coast Episcopal School Faculty November 2008 Coast Episcopal School Faculty November 2008."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google