Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Common Core for English Language Learners Mid-Continent Comprehensive Center (MC3) Regional ELL/CCSS Task Force 1.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Common Core for English Language Learners Mid-Continent Comprehensive Center (MC3) Regional ELL/CCSS Task Force 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Common Core for English Language Learners Mid-Continent Comprehensive Center (MC3) Regional ELL/CCSS Task Force 1

2 Welcome & Introductions Rosie García-Belina, Ed.D. MC3 ELL & Migrant Education Technical Assistance Coordinator Task Force Members Diane August, Ph.D. Mary Bridgforth, Ph.D. Lori Hanna, M.Ed. Amy Suzanne King, M.S. Melanie Manares, M.A. Melissa McGavock, M.S. Jennifer Shackles, M.A. Lucy Trautman, M.Ed. 2

3 Housekeeping Discussion/Interactive Format Guidelines Poll Questions and answer breaks Interactive exercises and discussion Questions/comments Those on the teleconference can questions to 3

4 Who is on the webinar? Please type your name, title, and state into the chat box. 4

5 Information in the Handout Task Force Membership Expected Outcomes Rationale The MC3 Professional Development Framework Considerations for working with English Language Learners Tri-State Quality Review Rubric for Lessons & Units (Version 4) 5

6 Information in the Handout Activities Annotated Resources Additional Resources 6

7 Expected Outcomes At the end of the webinar, participants will identify the structure of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and its relation to English Language Learners (ELLs); be aware of the considerations for guiding instruction for ELLs; recognize the elements needed to ensure all students meet the CCSS in English language arts and the additional support ELLs must receive to meet the standards; and improve the capacity of regional SEA administrators and staff as they understand what teachers will need to do to ensure ELLs meet the new standards and be prepared for higher education. 7

8 Any questions from the handout? 8

9 Poll What do you consider to be the greatest challenge to overcome to support ELLs in performing at high standards? A. Teacher preparation B. Lack of appropriate materials C. Heterogeneous levels of students’ English proficiency D. Other _______________ (please describe using the chat box) 9

10 Comments on Poll Results 10

11 Steps in the Process 11

12 The Process 1.Focus teaching and learning on a set of grade- appropriate standards. 2.Select grade-appropriate text that will assist students in meeting these standards. 3.Build students’ background knowledge. 4.Engage students in a close read of the text. 12

13 Exemplar: Gettysburg Address August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research 13

14 14 August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

15 Step 1. Target Grade-level Standards Focus Teaching & Learning on Grade-specific Standards 15

16 Target Grade-level Standards For All Students, including ELLs Consider standards across the content areas. At the elementary level, classroom teachers and resource teachers collaborate to select standards. In the elementary grades, 50% of text should be informational. At the secondary level, ELA teachers collaborate with other content area teachers to select standards. In secondary grades, 55-70% of text should be informational. For ELLs Incorporate English language proficiency standards that are aligned with the ELA standards Framework for English Language Proficiency Development Standards At all levels, classroom teachers and ELL teachers collaborate to select standards. 16

17 Target Grade-level Standards Gettysburg Address Exemplar: Reading Standards for Informational Text RI.7.2 Key Ideas and Details: Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. RI.7.4 Craft and Structure: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. RI.7.10 Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity: Read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. 17

18 Target Grade-level Standards Gettysburg Address Exemplar: Literacy Standards for History/Social Studies RH Craft and Structure: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies. RH Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos or maps) with other information in print and digital texts. 18

19 Target Grade-level Content Standards Gettysburg Address Exemplar: State Content Standards for Social Studies Arkansas: Students shall examine the political philosophies and the documents that shaped United States Constitutional Government. Kansas: The student understands the shared ideals and diversity of American society and political culture. Missouri: Students will acquire knowledge of principles expressed in the documents shaping constitutional democracy in the United States Oklahoma: Identify the contributions of political leaders, political activists, civil rights leaders. (OK.SS.3.F) 19

20 Target Grade-level English Proficiency Standards Gettysburg Address Exemplar: English Language Proficiency Standards appropriate for each level of proficiency ELPA: Reading - Standard 5: Students shall read, examine, and respond to a wide range of texts for a variety of purposes. Kansas: Domain 3: Reading. English learners will read English to acquire language and comprehend, analyze, interpret, and evaluate a variety of literary and informational texts. WIDA: English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of social studies. 20

21 Any questions so far? 21

22 Step 2. Select Appropriate Texts Include Clear and Explicit Purpose for Instruction 22

23 Select Appropriate Texts For all students (including ELLs), consider Quantitative attributes of text Qualitative attributes of text Reader characteristics Task characteristics Text characteristics Representative of divergent cultures, periods, and world views For ELLs, consider Levels of English language proficiency in selecting supplementary texts 23

24 Select Appropriate Texts Qualitative: levels of meaning or purpose, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands Quantitative: word length or frequency, sentence length, and text cohesion Reader and Task: specific to particular readers (e.g., motivation, knowledge, and experiences) and to particular tasks (e.g., purpose and the complexity of the task) National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers. (2010). Common core state standards for English language arts & literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects, Appendix A,. Washington D.C.: Authors. Retrieved from 24

25 Select Appropriate Texts Quantitative Measures for Selecting Text Lexile Find a Book (Lexile measure) The AR BookFinder (ATOS book level) Questar Degree of Reading Power - DRP Analyzer (Textbook readability score) ook_readability.aspx 25

26 Select Appropriate Texts Quantitative Measures for Selecting Text The higher the Lexile number, the more quantitatively complex the text. MetaMetrix. (2012). Text complexity grade bands and lexile bands. Durham, NC: Author. Retrieved from https://lexile.com/using-lexile/lexile-measures-and-the-ccssi/text-complexity-grade-bands-and-lexile-ranges/ https://lexile.com/using-lexile/lexile-measures-and-the-ccssi/text-complexity-grade-bands-and-lexile-ranges/ 26

27 Select Appropriate Texts Quantitative Measures for Selecting Text 27 National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers. (2012). Supplemental information for Appendix A of the common core state standards for English language arts and literacy: New research on text complexity. Washington D.C.: Authors. Retrieved from

28 Select Appropriate Texts Gettysburg Address Exemplar: Lexile and Grade Band 28 Text Lexile Level Grade Band Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate —we can not hallow— this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us— that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

29 Qualitative Measures for Selecting Text Text with multiple levels of meaning Distortions in organization of text (e.g., time sequences) Sophisticated figurative language Significant use of variations to standard English Specialized or technical content knowledge assumed/required Limited use of text features and graphics to cue the reader Extensive and unfamiliar general and domain-specific vocabulary Use of language that is archaic Select Appropriate Texts Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Lapp, D. (2012). Text Complexity Is the New Black. In Text Complexity (pp. 1-19). Newark, DE: International Reading Association. 29

30 Consider Text Features that Contribute to Complexity: Example Text with multiple levels of meaning Distortions in organization of text (e.g., time sequences) Sophisticated figurative language Significant use of variations to standard English Specialized or technical content knowledge assumed/required Limited use of text features and graphics to cue the reader Extensive and unfamiliar general and domain-specific vocabulary Use of language that is archaic Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. 30 August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

31 Select Appropriate Texts Resources for culturally relevant materials cation/Gettysburg_Tips_Interactive.pdf cation/Gettysburg_Tips_Interactive.pdf ome ome 31

32 Select Appropriate Texts Supplemental materials for learning about other cultures

33 Questions or comments? 33

34 Step 3. Build Background Make Connections to Prior Experience and Develop Content Knowledge and Skills 34

35 Assess Gaps Use the Learning Progressions to assess and address gaps in precursor skills. The Learning Progressions show the development of knowledge and skills for each standard from Kindergarten through Grade 12. Current standards documents show progressions across only three grade spans. These progressions enable educators to address precursor knowledge and skills associated with each grade-level standard. Many ELLs need additional instruction in precursor skills because of interrupted schooling. 35

36 Use Learning Progressions Reading Standards for Informational Text, K-5 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development, summarize the key supporting details and ideas RI.K.2 — With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. RI.1.2 — Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text RI.2.2 — Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text. RI.3.2 — Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. RI.4.2 — Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. RI.5.2 — Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text. 36

37 Use Learning Progressions Reading Standards for Informational Text, 6-8 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development, summarize the key supporting details and ideas RI.6.2 — Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. RI.7.2 — Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. RI.8.2 — Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary on the text. 37

38 Use Learning Progressions Reading Standards for Informational Text, 9-12 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development, summarize the key supporting details and ideas RI.9/10.2 — Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. RI.11/12.2 — Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. 38

39 Build Background For all students (including ELLs), consider Content related to ELA Content related to other disciplines Vocabulary Learning strategies (procedural knowledge) For ELLs, consider Basic vocabulary U.S. historical and cultural context For some ELLs, draw on Cognate knowledge First language knowledge and experience 39

40 Build Background Read the text carefully and determine which background knowledge is required to understand it. Provide background information drawn from a variety of resources. In some cases, you will have to create or adapt existing resources. Target the specific knowledge required. Be as brief as possible. Scaffold the content (in the background pieces) to make it comprehensible. 40

41 Build Background Gettysburg Address Exemplar: Students engage in activities to build background knowledge about the Gettysburg Address prior to reading it. Watch a video clip of an actor playing Abraham Lincoln deliver the Gettysburg Address. Read about the Gettysburg Address. Watch a video clip about Abraham Lincoln. Do an interactive reading about the Civil War. Do an interactive reading about the Declaration of Independence (a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal). 41 August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

42 Build Background Gettysburg Address Exemplar: Students engage in interactive reading and have access to glossed vocabulary. U.S. President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address during the Civil War. The Gettysburg Address was a speech delivered on November 19, 1863 at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg Pennsylvania. This is the cemetery where soldiers who died during the battle of Gettysburg had been buried. It is one of the most well-known speeches in United States history. delivered—gave a speech dedication – setting apart for a special purpose 42 August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

43 Build Background Gettysburg Address Exemplar: Students answer questions related to background knowledge. Sentence frames are provided. 43 Who delivered the Gettysburg Address? ______________ delivered the Gettysburg Address. What does “delivered” mean in this context? “Delivered” means ______ a speech. What else can “delivered” mean? “Delivered” also means __________ something to someone. Partner talk: What does “dedication” mean in this context? Why do you think Lincoln gave the speech? Start your sentences with “Dedication means ______.” “I think Lincoln gave the speech to ______.” Abraham Lincoln gave brought August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

44 Assist Students with Difficult Vocabulary From the Gettysburg Address Exemplar 44 Vocabulary for Direct Instruction Glossed Vocabulary conceive devotion resolve task civil created portion final dedicate* independence* liberty* bring forth detract engage fitting and proper hallow in vain nobly Note perish resting place score endure proposition August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

45 Activity: Identifying Vocabulary 1. Refer to the excerpt from “I Have a Dream” on page 13 of your handout. Read the paragraph and identify which words you would pre-teach. For all students For ELLS 2. Write one strategy you would use to teach these words. 3. Use the chat box to write your answer. 4. You will have three minutes to complete the activity. 45

46 Excerpt from Martin Luther King “I Have a Dream” “I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.” 46

47 Debriefing What did you do differently for the ELL students? 47

48 Step 4. Read Closely Make Central Focus of Instruction 48

49 Read Closely For all students (including ELLs) Ask text dependent questions Some text dependent questions are lower the level Require evidence Revisit the standards For ELLs Include additional lower the level questions if necessary Provide sentence frames Gloss vocabulary Use graphic organizers and visuals 49

50 Read Closely Create text-dependent questions for close analytic reading. Identify the core understandings and key ideas of the text. Start small to build confidence. Target vocabulary and text structure. Tackle tough sections head-on. Create coherent sequences of text-dependent questions. Identify the standards that are being addressed. Create the culminating assessment. 50 Achievement Partners (2012). “A guide to creating text dependent questions for close analytic reading” achievethecore.org

51 Read Closely Example: Text-dependent questions StepsExamples Identify key ideas A new nation was conceived in liberty. The nation was dedicated to equality. Start small to build confidence What does four score and twenty years ago mean? What does Lincoln mean by “our fathers”? Target vocabulary and text structure Vocabulary: brought forth, continent, nation Text structure: brought forth on this continent a new nation Tackle tough sections Entire first paragraph Create coherent sequences What is Lincoln saying is significant about America? What does Lincoln tell us about the new nation? Identify standardsSee Section 1 (“Target Grade-Level Standards”). Create culminating assessment Require students to summarize the text in their own words. August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research 51

52 Read Closely Example: Text-dependent questions StepsExamples Identify key ideasWhat were the two main characteristics of the new nation? Start small to build confidence What does four score and twenty years ago mean? What does Lincoln mean by our fathers? What was the new nation? Target vocabulary and text structure Our father brought forth on this continent a new nation. What does brought forth mean in this phrase? Restate this phrase in your own words. Tackle tough sections Entire first paragraph Create coherent sequences What does conceived mean? What does liberty mean? What is one thing Lincoln tells us about the new nation? Restate this in your own words. Identify standardsSee Section 1 (“Target Grade-Level Standards”). Create culminating assessment Require students to summarize the text in their own words. 52 August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

53 Read Closely Text-based Evidence 53 TypeExplanation Direct Citation v. Paraphrase You may ask students to point to the exact line or phrase that supports an idea or conclusion, or you can ask them to summarize the supporting text. In both cases, students should clearly identify the evidence for their response. Drawing v. Supporting Conclusions You can provide students with a conclusion and ask them to support it with evidence from the text, or alternatively, you can state a line or phrase of text and ask them to draw a conclusion that is supported by that line or phrase. Evidence for 1 v. Multiple Conclusions In some cases, evidence from the text only supports a single conclusion. In other cases, the text seems to support multiple viable conclusions. Help students determine the difference by asking them to provide evidence for their conclusions. Supporting Own or Others’ Conclusions You may ask students to draw a conclusion and support it with evidence, or you may ask one student to draw a conclusion, and other students to find evidence for the conclusion. The conclusion is only supported if evidence can be found in the text. Creating Lower the Level Questions From Uncommon Schools (http://www.uncommonschools.org)http://www.uncommonschools.org

54 Read Closely Text-based Evidence 54 TypeExample Direct Citation v. Paraphrase C: Which phrases tell us what is special about the new nation? P: In your own words, say what is special about America. Drawing v. Supporting Conclusions D: Lincoln says the nation was conceived in liberty. What does that tell you about America? S: What does Lincoln say that let’s us know America is special? Evidence for 1 v. Multiple Conclusions 1: We know that the nation is special because it was created with equality in mind. What does the text say to support this? Can we say anything else about the nation from the text? Supporting Own or Others’ Conclusions Self: You told us that America is special because it was created to be free. Can you tell us some evidence to support that? Other: Julia says he thinks America is free. Who can find some evidence to support that conclusion? As appropriate, have students identify evidence in the text for their response. August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

55 Read Closely Scaffolds for ELLs Glossing of Vocabulary Additional Lower-the-Level Questions Graphic Organizers and visuals Provide Sentence Frames 55

56 Read Closely Example Scaffolds: Students engage in interactive reading of the Gettysburg Address and have access to glossed vocabulary; students answer questions with sentence frames that can be adapted for different levels of language proficiency. 56 Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. score – twenty bring forth – create August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

57 Read Closely Example Scaffolds: Additional Lower-the-Level questions and sentence frames 1. What does Lincoln mean by “four score and seven years ago?” Four score and seven years ago means______ years ago. 2. What does Lincoln mean by “our fathers”? By “our fathers” Lincoln means ____________________________. 3. What nation was brought forth or created four score and seven years before the Gettysburg address? _________________________was brought forth or created the men who founded the U.S. The United States Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. score – twenty bring forth – create August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

58 Read Closely Example Scaffolds (cont.) 4.The new nation was conceived in liberty. What does the phrase “conceived in liberty” mean? Conceived in liberty” means that _____________________________. 5.The nation was “dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal” What does the proposition or idea “all men are created equal” mean? All men are created equal” means that ___________________________________. 58 Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. score – twenty bring forth – create it was created to be free everyone has the same rights and freedoms August, et al. (2012). Washington, DC: Center for English Language Learners, American Institutes for Research

59 Shared Activity 59

60 Participant Activity Refer to the Martin Luther King, Jr. passage (see next slide). Prepare two text-dependent questions. Assume students have been given the background knowledge they need to understand the context of this passage. Make sure one question is a lower-the-level question, and the questions are framed in a way that requires students to provide evidence for their responses. For your two text-dependent questions, provide sentence frames for students. 60

61 Excerpt from Martin Luther King, Jr. “I Have a Dream” “I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.” 61

62 Debriefing 62

63 Participant Activity 1. What does King state happened five score years ago? King states that the ________________________ was signed five score years ago. 2. What did the Emancipation Proclamation end? What words in the text lead you to this answer? The Emancipation Proclamation ended _______. The words that lead me to this answer are “end the _____ ______ of _______ _________.” Emancipation Proclamation slavery (Lower-the-Level Question) long night theircaptivity 63

64 Comments? Questions? Concerns? 64

65 Please refer to your handout for annotated references and additional resources. This webinar has been recorded and will be made available for replay online.

66 66 Before you leave, please click on the link below and complete the evaluation survey. Thank you!

67 For additional information, please contact MC3 REGIONAL ELL/CCSS TASK FORCE c/o the University of Oklahoma Rosie García Belina, Ed.D., Coordinator Portions of this presentation may have been developed under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Education; however, the contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2012 The University of Oklahoma 67


Download ppt "Common Core for English Language Learners Mid-Continent Comprehensive Center (MC3) Regional ELL/CCSS Task Force 1."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google