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1 Lesson 11 Exploring Microsoft Office 2010 Computer Literacy BASICS: A Comprehensive Guide to IC 3, 4 th Edition.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Lesson 11 Exploring Microsoft Office 2010 Computer Literacy BASICS: A Comprehensive Guide to IC 3, 4 th Edition."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Lesson 11 Exploring Microsoft Office 2010 Computer Literacy BASICS: A Comprehensive Guide to IC 3, 4 th Edition

2 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 222 Objectives Start Microsoft Office 2010 applications. Switch between application windows. Close applications. Navigate and identify the common elements in application windows. Identify the elements in the new Office 2010 user interface. Customize the Quick Access Toolbar.

3 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 333 Objectives (continued) Open, save, and close documents. Use on-screen and online Help features.

4 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 444 Vocabulary Application window: The primary interface between the user and the application. (Mod2-4) Backstage view: Provides quick access to common tasks for managing documents, such as saving, opening, and printing. (Mod2-4) Cursor: Another term for insertion point. (Mod2-11) Document window: The area where you enter new text and data or change existing text and data. (Mod2-10) File: A collection of information saved as a unit. (Mod2-18) File compatibility: The ability to open and work with files without a format conflict. (Mod2-23) File extension: Three or four characters after the filename that identify the type of file. (Mod2-18)

5 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 555 Vocabulary Folder: A means for organizing files into manageable groups on a designated storage device. (Mod2-18) I-beam: The shape of the arrow pointer when positioned within the document window. (Mod2-11) Insertion point: A blinking vertical line that indicates the location in the document where the new text and data will be entered. (Mod2-11) Jump List: A collection of links that provides quick access to files and data. (Mod2-19) Minimized: An application that is still running, but the application window is no longer displayed on the screen, and an application button is displayed in the taskbar. (Mod 2-5) Open: To load a file into an application. (Mod2-18)

6 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 666 Vocabulary (continued) Path: The route the operating system uses to locate a document. (Mod2-18) Ribbon: The blue banner that stretches across the top of the screen, just below the title bar. (Mod2-13) Save: To store a document on a disk or other storage medium. (Mod2-24) ScreenTip: A small window that appears when you position the mouse pointer over the button. (Mod2-5) Scroll: Moving through the document window on the screen without changing the location of the insertion point. (Mod2-11) Shortcut menu: A list of commonly performed commands from the current window. (Mod2-5) Subfolders: Folders within folders. (Mod2-18)

7 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 777 Starting and Closing Applications Microsoft Office 2010 is an integrated software package that enables you to share information between several applications. The applications available on your computer depend upon which Office suite is installed and the options that were selected during the installation Microsoft offers various Office Suites: – Office Professional 2010 – Office Home and Student 2010

8 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 888 Starting and Closing Applications Office applications available are: – Word – PowerPoint – Excel – Access – Outlook – One Note – Publisher – InfoPath – Lync – Project – SharePoint – Workspace – Visio

9 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 999 Starting and Closing Applications Each application performs specific tasks. The table below provides a brief description of the applications covered in depth in this module:

10 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 10 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) The steps for starting and closing all Office applications are the same, and the steps will also apply to other applications such as Internet Explorer and Windows Media Player. When you click the File tab, Backstage view is displayed. Backstage view provides quick access to common tasks for managing documents, such as saving, opening, and printing.

11 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 11 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) You can start most applications by double- clicking the application icon on the desktop or by using the Start button in the lower-left corner of the screen.

12 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 12 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) Starting Applications and Switching Between Applications (continued) The application window serves as the primary interface between the user and the application.

13 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 13 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) Multiple applications can be open at the same time. A button for each open application appears on the taskbar at the bottom of the screen. To switch from one open application to another, click the application button on the taskbar.

14 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 14 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) When you position the mouse pointer over the button, the name of the button is displayed in a small window called a ScreenTip. Minimized applications are still running, but the application windows are no longer displayed on the screen. The application button is displayed on the taskbar, and when you click the application button on the taskbar, the application window reopens.

15 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 15 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) Buttons for commonly used applications, such as Media Player or Internet Explorer, may also appear on the taskbar, even if they are not running. To rearrange the order of the buttons on the taskbar, you can drag-and-drop the application buttons to reposition them. To switch from one open application to another, click the application button on the taskbar.

16 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 16 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) To display desktop without closing applications, click on the show desktop button located on the right side of the taskbar When you click this button, all open applications are minimized, which means they are still running but no longer displayed

17 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 17 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) You can view multiple application windows at the same time by changing the layout of the windows on the screen. To access layout options, right-click taskbar and select from options in shortcut menu To view multiple running application windows at the same time, you need to “Cascade” the windows

18 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 18 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) Quick Tip: If you want an application to constantly appear in the Start menu, click Start, click All Programs, and then right-click the application name. In the shortcut menu, click Pin to Start Menu.

19 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 19 Starting and Closing Applications (continued) Closing Applications and Backstage View In Backstage view, you can quickly access the Close and Exit commands. The Close command will close the active document. The Exit command will close all active documents and the application.

20 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 20 Navigating Application Windows The application window includes many of the elements of all Windows screens, including the title bar, scroll bars, and status bar. The document window is the area where you enter new text and data or change existing text and data.

21 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 21 Navigating Application Windows (continued) The insertion point (often referred to as the cursor) is a blinking vertical line that indicates the location in the document where the new text and data will be entered. The arrow keys (up, down, left, or right), the page up and page down keys, as well as the mouse will allow you to reposition the insertion point to a desired location.

22 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 22 Navigating Application Windows (continued) When positioned within the document window, the pointer changes from an arrow to an I-beam, which looks like a capital “I”. Position the I-beam over the text in the document where you would like to reposition the insertion point, and then click.

23 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 23 Navigating Application Windows (continued) When you scroll through a document, you move through the document window on the screen without changing the location of the insertion point. To scroll, use the horizontal or vertical scroll bars, or if available, use the wheel on the mouse or the track pad.

24 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 24 Navigating Application Windows (continued) Quick Tip: The arrow keys and the Page Up and Page Down keys will not move the insertion point in a blank document. As soon as text and data are added to the document, the keys will perform as described.

25 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 25 Using the Office User Interface Using the Office Ribbon The Ribbon is the blue banner that stretches across the top of the screen. The Ribbon displays several tabs, including the Home Tab Related commands and options are organized in groups on each tab.

26 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 26 Using the Office User Interface Related commands and options are organized in groups on each tab. A Dialog Box Launcher that appears in the lower-right corner of some groups. When clicked it opens to reveal more options related to the group. As you work in a document, the Ribbon adapts by providing appropriate commands and options.

27 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 27 Using the Office User Interface The Ribbon is adaptable to providing the commands that you need depending upon what you are working on. Example: If you insert a picture, the Ribbon changes to display tabs related to formatting pictures. If you do not know the function of a button in a group, position the mouse pointer over the button, but do not click. A ScreenTip will appear with the name of that command. You can access the Ribbon using keyboard shortcuts. You can minimize/maximize the Ribbon by double-clicking on one of the tabs.

28 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 28 Using the Office User Interface (continued) Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar By default, the Quick Access Toolbar is positioned above the Ribbon in the upper-left corner of the application window. This toolbar offers quick access to commands you use frequently. By default it includes the three options listed at the side:

29 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 29 Using the Office User Interface (continued) You can customize the toolbar to include the commands you use most often. Be careful not to include too many as it will slow you down.

30 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 30 Using the Office User Interface (continued) Quick Tip: To hide the keyboard shortcuts without executing a command, press Alt, press Esc, or click a different tab name. Above and Beyond: You can move the Quick Access Toolbar so it appears below the Ribbon. Click the Customize Quick Access Toolbar button, and then click the option Show Below the Ribbon.

31 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 31 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents To open a document means to load a file into an application. A file is a collection of information saved as a unit. Each file is identified by a filename. The terms “document” and “file” are used interchangeably.

32 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 32 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) Opening a Document The Open command in Backstage view, which is accessed using the File tab, enables you to open a file from any available disk and folder. You can also open a file from the desktop or Windows Explorer. Once located, simply double-click to open it. A file extension identifies the type of file and a period separates the filename and the extension.

33 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 33 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) The extension is usually three or four characters and varies depending on the application used to create the document. Word =.docxPowerPoint =.pptxExcel =.xlsx The “X” in these extensions indicates the XML format. You can identify documents from earlier versions of Office because they do not include the “X” at the end of their extension

34 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 34 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) A folder is a means for organizing files into manageable groups on a designated storage device. All computer files are saved in folders. Subfolders are folders within folders. The path is the route the operating system uses to locate a document. The path identifies the disk and any folders relative to the location of the document.

35 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 35 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) Shown below are two (2) typical paths and identifies the items in the paths.

36 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 36 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) You can open multiple documents within each application. When multiple documents are open within one application, the taskbar displays the documents stacked behind the application button. When you right-click the application button on the taskbar, a Jump List appears. A Jump List is a collection of links that provides quick access to files and data.

37 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 37 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) Quick Tip: You can control the number of filenames that appear in the Recent Documents list by changing the display settings in the Word Options dialog box. Click File, click Options, and then click Advanced. Scroll down, and under the heading Display, change the setting for Show this number of Recent Documents. The maximum number of documents you can display is 50.

38 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 38 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) Tip: To open multiple documents at the same time, click the first filename in the Open dialog box, hold down Ctrl, and click one or more additional filenames, then click Open. Above and Beyond: To preview a file before opening it, click the Start button and then in the list at the right, click Documents. In the dialog box, click Organize and then point to Layout. If necessary, enable the option Preview pane. When you select a filename, the document will be displayed in the Preview pane. Click anywhere in the Preview pane and scroll through the document.

39 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 39 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) Quick Tip: You can also navigate to a file or folder by clicking the Start button and then, in the right pane of the Start menu, click Computer. Above and Beyond: If the Windows theme is set for Aero Windows 7, you can use Windows Flip 3D to quickly preview all open windows. Hold down Ctrl and the Windows logo key and then press Tab. Flip 3D displays the open windows in a stack. Use the mouse wheel or the track pad to flip through the stack. Click a window in the stack to show that window, or click outside the stack to close the Flip 3D display. You can also hold down the Windows logo key and then press Tab to flip through the stack one window at a time.

40 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 40 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) Solving Problems with Opening Documents The following are descriptions of common problems: – File compatibility refers to the ability to open and work with files without a format conflict. – Files created in newer applications may not be backwards compatible. – You may encounter compatibility problems if you are working in a different operating system other than the one in which the file was created.

41 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 41 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) – This problem occurs when you are working with different versions of software across different platforms. Such as Mac to PC or PC to Mac – If, when you use the Open command from the File tab, you do not see the file you are looking for, it could be caused by a number of things. First, you need to verify the document was saved before it was closed. Second, you need to verify you are looking in the right disk and the right folder.

42 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 42 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) – The file is in a format that cannot be read by the application you are using (example: using Word to open an Access File) – You encounter a corrupted file or a file that will not open. You can try to open the file on a different computer to verify that the file is indeed corrupt and that there is not something wrong with your computer.

43 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 43 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) Saving and Closing a Document To save a document means to store it on a disk or other storage medium. – You can save documents to the following: Hard Drive on Computer Auxiliary Drive Network Location Portable Media – USB Flash Drive or CD/DVD To make it easier to find documents, choose filenames with words that help describe the document.

44 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 44 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) File Extensions are automatically added to the file name when saved. Complete path to the file can include up to 255 characters. Filenames cannot contain any of the following characters: \ / : * ? “ | When you click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar, the document is saved with the same filename and in the same location. To make it easier to find documents, choose filenames with words that help describe the document.

45 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 45 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) When you click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar, the document is saved with the same filename and in the same location. If the file does not already have a name, the SAVE AS dialog box will open Unless you specify a disk and folder, the file will be saved to the default location - Usually in the Documents folders on the C: drive (Hard Drive) When you change the filename or the location where the file is stored, the original document, with the original name, remains unchanged

46 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 46 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) When you use the Save As command, you have the opportunity to change the document format, location of the document, and the filename. Above and Beyond: To create a new folder, in the Save As dialog box, click New folder. The new folder will be added to the folder that is currently open in the dialog box.

47 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 47 Opening, Saving, and Closing Documents (continued) To close a document, you can click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the application window. Whether you click the Close button in the application window or the Close button on the thumbnail, when you close the last open document, the application closes, too. Quick Tip: As an alternative to using the Close button to close the active document window, press Ctrl+F4. To close the application window, press Alt+F4.

48 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 48 Getting Help Whenever you encounter a problem, your first source of help should be the Help features in each Office application. The Help button looks like a question mark. Navigating the Help screens is much like navigating a Web page. If your computer is connected to the Internet, you will also have access to all the current Help information available from the Microsoft Office.com Web site.

49 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 49 Getting Help Quick Tip: To reposition the Help dialog box, drag the title bar. You can also resize the dialog box by dragging one of the borders. Warning: When you drag a dialog box or an application window to the very top of the screen, the dialog box or the window is automatically maximized. If the dialog box becomes maximized as you try to reposition it, click the Restore Down button and then try repositioning it again. You can drag the dialog box as far to the right as desired; just do not drag the title bar to the very top of the screen.

50 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 50 Getting Help Net Business – Office Web Apps are online companions to Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote that enable you to access documents anytime and anywhere. – Allow you to Create, Edit, Save, and Share your documents via a web connection (Internet). – Access these apps through Windows Live – Store information on SkyDrive (free online storage service from Windows Live)

51 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 51 Summary In this lesson, you learned: You can start an Office application by clicking the Start button on the taskbar and selecting the application from the All Programs menu, or you can double-click the application icon on the desktop. Backstage view provides quick access to common tasks for managing documents, such as saving, opening, and printing. 51

52 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 52 Summary (continued) Common elements found in Office application windows include the title bar, scroll bars, and status bar. You can maximize the space for the document window by minimizing the Ribbon. You can customize the Quick Access Toolbar by adding or removing command buttons. The Open dialog box enables you to open a file from any available disk and folder. 52

53 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 53 Summary (continued) Problems opening files can involve corrupted data or file compatibility issues, such as trying to open a file in a different application, in an earlier version of an application, or in an operating system other than that used to create it. To save a document using a new filename, click the File tab and then click the Save As command. 53

54 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 54 Summary (continued) To close a document, you can click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the application window, or you can click the File tab and then click the Close command. You can also close a document by clicking the Close button in the document thumbnail that is displayed when you point to the application button on the taskbar. 54

55 Lesson 11 Morrison / WellsCLB: A Comp Guide to IC 3 4E 55 Summary (continued) Several sources of help are available including application Help features, assistance from others, books and manuals, and online help. 55


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