Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Center for Urban Transportation Research | University of South Florida Rob Gregg

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Center for Urban Transportation Research | University of South Florida Rob Gregg"— Presentation transcript:

1 Center for Urban Transportation Research | University of South Florida Rob Gregg Gregg@cutr.usf.edu

2 Center for Urban Transportation Research | University of South Florida Florida Transit Marketing Network 2013 FTPA Annual Conference PUBLIC TRANSIT AND HEALTH: ACCESS TO HEALTH SERVICES, GENERAL HEALTH BENEFITS OF USING TRANSIT AND MARKETING OPPORTUNITIES October 29, 2013 l Rob Gregg l Holly Carapella l Mark Mistretta l Melissa DeLeon

3 3 Welcome & Introductions http://www.fl-exchange.com/  Florida Transit Marketing Network  Professional Development  Networking  Sharing

4 4

5 5 Marketing Transit: Current Major Themes 1.Name 2.Agency / Organization 3.Marketing themes in your community that “sells” the benefits of Public Transportation Speed Thinking

6 6 Health & Wellness

7 7 Health Issues / Industry / Products / PR

8 8 Coming Together

9 9

10 10 Health Issues / Industry / Products / PR

11 11 Choices

12 12

13 13

14 14 Public Transit & Health Research Topic Define Industry Scan Literature Search Industry Search Advisory Group Data Reports Templates White Paper Source References Findings, Examples, Materials

15 15 Objectives: I.Overview of Obesity Problem and Long Term Consequences II.Discuss Relevance of Public Transportation to a variety of Health related topics III.Present a synopsis of information and references IV.Brainstorm on Marketing opportunities and application of Health themes in Florida

16 16 Obesity in America Rate of Obesity in 2010 = 36% Projected Rate in 2030 = 50% Source: A Healthier America. Trust for America’s Health. January 2013.

17 17 Obesity in America Obesity Related Health Care Costs = $550 Million in 2010 Obesity Related Health Care Costs = $630 Million in 2030 at current rate Source: A Healthier America. Trust for America’s Health. January 2013.

18 18 Health Services (Access) Variety of Customer Markets Health Providers Health Benefits Public Health Issues Physical Health Psychological / Stress

19 19 So How Does Transportation and Public Transit Factor into the Public Health (Obesity) Problem/Solution? Transportation Investments Land Use Patterns Travel Behavior Health Source: The Hidden Health Costs of Transportation. Urban Design 4 Health for the American Public Health Association. 2010.

20 20 What is Happening to Consider Public Health in Transportation Planning and Decision Making? Public Health Organizations – Education about transportation planning process National Programs, Initiatives & Plans State Level Programs/Opportunities Local Level Programs/Opportunities

21 21 Public Health Organizations Guidance Documents written for Public Health Organizations/Practitioners on how to become a player at the transportation decision making table. American Public Health Association  Promoting Active Transportation: An Opportunity for Public Health  At the Intersection of Public Health and Transportation: Promoting Healthy Transportation Policy Center for Disease Control (CDC)  Recommendations for Improving Health through Transportation Policy  Transportation Health Impact Assessment Toolkit

22 22 National Programs/Initiatives & Plans Office of the Surgeon General/National Prevention Council  National Prevention Strategy-America’s Plan for Better Health and Wellness, June 2011 US Department of Transportation  Metropolitan Area Transportation Planning for Healthy Communities (for MPOs to incorporate health policies into metropolitan planning) Active Living Research  Tools, Resources, Training, Webinars American Planning Association/Centers for Disease Control  Healthy Community Design Toolkit

23 23 State Level Programs/Opportunities State of Oklahoma Community Health Department  Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign – Partnering with community groups to campaign for dedicated funding sources for transit in the communities. State of Florida Department of Health Florida State Health Improvement Plan Identifies transit as a factor and partner in the health of Floridians. Source: Florida Department of Health. Florida State Health Improvement Plan 2012-2015.

24 24 Local Level Programs/Opportunities Metropolitan Planning Organizations Nashville Area MPO Long Range Transportation Plan Project criteria now includes consideration of health impacts. Transit Agencies/APTA Marketing materials emphasizing public health benefits of using transit Health Impact Assessments

25 25 Future Steps/Recommendations Find the linkage between health care agencies and transit agencies both in the delivery of access to health care and overall health and well-being of local constituents. Partnerships/Collaborations Funding Mechanisms Community Support American Public Health Association. At the Intersection of Public Health and Transportation: Promoting Healthy Transportation Policy

26 26 Collection Sampler Public Transportation and Health

27 27 Access to Health Services Transit-Accessible Locations for Health and Social Services (MTC SF) Health Care and Public Transit – Your Ticket to Health Care Access (Iowa) Health Benefits of Transit Evaluating Public Transportation Health Benefits (FTA Fact Sheet) Walking Associated With Public Transit: Moving Toward Increased Physical Activity in the United States The Effect of Light Rail Transit on Body Mass Index and Physical Activity Health Impact Assessments San Diego BRT San Francisco Bus Funding

28 But it’s not all bad news. Because the choices we make about what kind of transportation systems to build can have the power to improve the public’s health when they make it easier for families to safely walk, bike or conveniently reach public transportation. According to the Weight of the Nation series, a “great way to increase your physical activity is to find active ways to get to work, to school, to the store, or to any other place you go.” At the very moment that Congress is debating whether or not to preserve programs like Safe Routes to School and others designed to help communities provide more travel options and make walking and biking safer, consider the potential benefits if we make those things a priority: Active commuting that incorporates cycling and walking is associated with an 11 percent reduction in cardiovascular risk [2]; Teenagers who bike or walk to school watch less TV and are less likely to smoke than their peers who are driven to school, in addition to getting more overall physical activity daily [3]; Public transit users spend roughly eight more minutes walking each day than drivers [4]. By providing more safe transportation options that can be accessed by all users – across ages, incomes and abilities – we improve the community’s health and all-around quality of life. Considering the incredible levels of obesity in America highlighted by the films, why wouldn’t we prioritize the very strategies that can reduce the obesity rate and increase opportunities to incorporate physical activity into our daily lives, — whether that’s trails for runners, bike lanes for commuters or sidewalks for a stroll to the store? May 31, 2012 By Transportation for America HBO’s new film series highlights the shocking state of our country’s obesity levels and worsening health, highlighting the impacts of the transportation systems we build and where we live on those alarming trends. An influential public health expert weighs in for T4 America on the movie and the connections to transportation. Ed Note: This guest post comes from Susan Polan of the American Public Health Association, a T4 America partner. You can also watch Weight of the Nation for free in its entirety on the HBO website. by Susan Polan, PhD With the launch of the four-part Weight of the Nation film series on HBO, the nation is getting another stark reminder that our health is impacted by how our communities are designed. Too many of our communities are sorely lacking opportunities for safe walking and biking or good access to public transportation. The film confirms this reality. We have engineered physical activity out of our daily lives and Americans spend approximately 100 hours each year commuting.[1] The consequences from a lack of physical activity in communities across the U.S. are shocking. In January 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a survey of America’s health, which showed that almost 32 percent of 2- to 19-year-olds and nearly 69 percent of adults in America are overweight or obese. According to the film series, when it comes to obesity and its related diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer, evidence shows that “your zip code may matter more than your genetic code.” Furthermore, the nation’s most vulnerable groups – such as children, low-income households, communities of color – typically bear the greatest burden of these negative health impacts.

29 29 INFOGRAPHICS

30 30 INFOGRAPHICS

31 31 INFOGRAPHICS

32 32

33 33 Public Transportation and Health POSITION STATEMENT Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign "Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there." ~Will Rogers Public Transportation and Health POSITION STATEMENT Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign "Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there." ~Will Rogers Public transportation supports healthy communities by… Allowing people to get daily exercise by walking or biking to transit stops Reducing air pollution and pollution-related respiratory ailments, like asthma Providing access to jobs which is crucial to long term health especially for those without a car Directly, some people can take the bus instead of driving. Indirectly, when people take the bus, bike, etc, there is less traffic and stress for those who do drive reducing road rage, long commutes, and traffic jams Boosting mental health by building a sense of community cohesion and connection to neighbors

34 34 Public Transportation and Health POSITION STATEMENT Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign "Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there." ~Will Rogers Public Transportation and Health POSITION STATEMENT Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign "Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there." ~Will Rogers Public transportation can provide access to healthy community resources such as … Life-sustaining medical treatments and doctor’s appointments Healthy food outlets like grocery stores and farmers’ markets Places for play and being physically active, such as parks and walking/biking trails

35 35 Public Transportation and Health POSITION STATEMENT Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign "Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there." ~Will Rogers Public Transportation and Health POSITION STATEMENT Oklahoma Health Equity Campaign "Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there." ~Will Rogers POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS Goal: Increase access to healthcare and jobs through reliable, low-cost public transit Provide adequate funding for a first-class transit system through dedicated state and local funding Increase coverage area and route frequencies of public transit systems Connect rural and outlying communities with timely, affordable public transit Goal: Build healthy cities and communities that give people cleaner, safer options for active transportation Encourage “green” development and pedestrian-friendly planning Discourage sprawl, and invest in enhancing our existing communities through infill development Create “complete streets” that serve all users by incorporating safe sidewalks, proper bus stops, bike lanes, and crosswalks in design and construction Provide safe crossings and sidewalks near transit stops

36 36 Do You Promote Access to Health Services? 1 Examples? 2 Issues / Opportunities 3 Collaborative Partnerships? 4 Health Services

37 37 Do You Promote Health Benefits of PT? 1 Examples? 2 Issues / Opportunities 3 Collaborative Partnerships? 4 Health Benefits

38 38

39 Center for Urban Transportation Research | University of South Florida End Thank You


Download ppt "Center for Urban Transportation Research | University of South Florida Rob Gregg"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google