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Investment Schools Phase One: 2013-2014 Robinson G. Jones School May 9, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Investment Schools Phase One: 2013-2014 Robinson G. Jones School May 9, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Investment Schools Phase One: Robinson G. Jones School May 9, 2013

2 2 Hopes and dreams What are your hopes and dreams for your child? Becoming a doctor Sharing my love of reading nonfiction Earning a 4-year college degree Mastering the multiplication tables Enjoying school

3 3 Investment Schools: Our context Investment Schools: Our plan Investment Schools: Our message

4 4 Becoming a portfolio district: Choices that children deserve Promote and expand high-performing schools Start new schools Strengthen mid-performing schools Repurpose low-performing schools The Cleveland Plan

5 5 It is not enough to become a premier school district CMSD must become a district of premier schools. Key Message

6 6 The time is right for CMSD The Cleveland Plan Tax levy State legislation

7 7 Investment Schools: Our context Investment Schools: Our plan Investment Schools: Our message

8 8 What works: Thinking differently about schools Old thinking: “Conveyor belt” Student is moved along a curriculum-, grade- and age- based “conveyor belt,” in a process that lends itself to standardized inputs and outputs New thinking: “Medical team” A team rallies for each student, backed by a whole system of skilled professionals, processes, and technologies organized and ready to analyze, diagnose, and serve the goal of learning

9 9 What makes urban schools successful? readiness to TEACH 4. Shared responsibility for achievement Staff feel deep accountability and missionary zeal for student achievement. 4. Shared responsibility for achievement Staff feel deep accountability and missionary zeal for student achievement. 5. Personalization of instruction Individualized teaching based on diagnostic assessment and adjustable time on task. 5. Personalization of instruction Individualized teaching based on diagnostic assessment and adjustable time on task. 6. Professional teaching culture Continuous improvement through collaboration and job-embedded learning. 6. Professional teaching culture Continuous improvement through collaboration and job-embedded learning. readiness to LEARN 1. Safety, discipline & engagement Students feel secure and inspired to learn. 1. Safety, discipline & engagement Students feel secure and inspired to learn. 2. Action against adversity Schools directly address the challenges faced by students living in poverty. 2. Action against adversity Schools directly address the challenges faced by students living in poverty. 3. Close student-adult relationships Students have positive and enduring mentor/teacher relationships. readiness to ACT 7. Resource authority School leaders can make mission-driven decisions regarding people, time, money, and programs. 7. Resource authority School leaders can make mission-driven decisions regarding people, time, money, and programs. 8. Resource ingenuity Leaders are adept at securing additional resources and leveraging partner relationships. 8. Resource ingenuity Leaders are adept at securing additional resources and leveraging partner relationships. 9. Agility in the face of turbulence Leaders, teachers, and systems are flexible and inventive responding to constant unrest. 9. Agility in the face of turbulence Leaders, teachers, and systems are flexible and inventive responding to constant unrest. Mass Insight Education, The Turnaround Challenge (2007)

10 10 R.G. Jones School: Relentless focus on “Readiness to Teach” readiness to TEACH Shared responsibility for achievement Staff feel deep accountability and missionary zeal for student achievement. Shared responsibility for achievement Staff feel deep accountability and missionary zeal for student achievement. Personalization of instruction Individualized teaching based on diagnostic assessment and adjustable time on task. Personalization of instruction Individualized teaching based on diagnostic assessment and adjustable time on task. Professional teaching culture Continuous improvement through collaboration and job-embedded learning. Professional teaching culture Continuous improvement through collaboration and job-embedded learning. readiness to LEARN readiness to ACT

11 11 What other Year 1 Investment Schools will be in the Readiness to Teach cohort? readiness to TEACH 4. Shared responsibility for achievement Staff feel deep accountability and missionary zeal for student achievement. 4. Shared responsibility for achievement Staff feel deep accountability and missionary zeal for student achievement. 5. Personalization of instruction Individualized teaching based on diagnostic assessment and adjustable time on task. 5. Personalization of instruction Individualized teaching based on diagnostic assessment and adjustable time on task. 6. Professional teaching culture Continuous improvement through collaboration and job-embedded learning. 6. Professional teaching culture Continuous improvement through collaboration and job-embedded learning.  Case  Robinson G. Jones  Walton  Franklin D. Roosevelt

12 12 What “foundational levers” have been identified for Robinson G. Jones? Strategies consideredRight levers for Robinson G. Jones? Replace current principal All Investment School principals must re-interview with the CEO Replace some or all staffNo; all staff must sign Investment Commitment letter Offer extended learning timeNo Overhaul school culture & disciplineNo Improve school facilitiesYes, “facelift” according to building conditions Add community/health support (“wraparound”) services Yes, with community input Add instructional programsYes, improve rigor of instruction and add instructional coaches Provide staff with meaningful professional development Yes, with community input Utilize external operating partnerNo

13 13 What visible changes must we see in Investment Schools? Building educators’ Readiness to Teach:  Extra time for teachers to collaborate, learn from one another, and plan outstanding, relevant lessons Holding every adult accountable for the success of every student Integrated use of classroom technology to engage students  Targeted professional development and ongoing coaching on how to use available data to meet individual students’ learning needs  Curriculum and resources to support high-quality instruction for English Language Learners and Special Education students  All-school training to deepen staff commitment to a culture of learning, high expectations, and every student graduating from high school prepared for college and career success 4. Shared responsibility for achievement Staff feel deep accountability and missionary zeal for student achievement. 4. Shared responsibility for achievement Staff feel deep accountability and missionary zeal for student achievement. 5. Personalization of instruction Individualized teaching based on diagnostic assessment and adjustable time on task. 5. Personalization of instruction Individualized teaching based on diagnostic assessment and adjustable time on task. 6. Professional teaching culture Continuous improvement through collaboration and job-embedded learning. 6. Professional teaching culture Continuous improvement through collaboration and job-embedded learning.

14 14 Other changes to expect at Robinson G. Jones Ongoing performance-monitoring against school and classroom goals Regular, responsive interactions with families and community stakeholders An intensively student-centered mindset Development of meaningful, effective, relevant instructional models that will empower all students to achieve at high levels

15 15 Robinson G. Jones as a Phase 1 Investment School Collaborate with proven partners to dramatically change schools Engage families and educators at the school level to design high- leverage interventions for each building Prepare to implement effective practices in a subset of high-need schools starting August 2013 These are key next steps. Many design decisions will need your input over these next weeks.

16 16 Building the school that students need and deserve What do you need to see to ensure that R.G. Jones is constantly improving to meet the needs of every student? WE WILL ISSUE REPORT CARDS ON OUR PROGRESS. How can leadership and staff at R.G. Jones communicate with every family to build a genuine home-school partnership to support every student? WE WILL LISTEN, AND CREATE THE STRUCTURES THAT WORK FOR YOU.

17 17 What turnaround is NOT: Investment Schools = Positive Change Settling for incremental improvement Requiring additional improvement plans Additional mandates without support Multiple programs implemented without intentionality Infrequent coaching “Every man for himself” What SUCCESSFUL turnaround IS: Recognition of the challenge: Our kids deserve better Dramatic, fundamental change Collaborative community of professional educators Urgency to make every minute a learning minute Working smarter, not harder Supportive operating conditions We will not do business as usual; this is unusual business. We will not repeat old mistakes.

18 18 No “magic bullets” – Only people can bring real change We need all of our staff, families, community, business, and education partners to come together around the Investment Schools. Key Message

19 19 Communications outreach to all families and school staffs: CEO Gordon and CAO Pierre-Farid will personally lead meetings in each school community during the next month Schools will undergo an intensive and collaborative analysis and planning process with carefully selected partners CMSD Human Resources will commence a recruitment and staff selection campaign Investing in our children: CMSD’s Investment Schools What else is happening across Investment Schools?

20 20 Q&A / Listening to the community WE ARE INvested. ARE YOU IN?

21 21 How YOU can INvest in your child’s education o Get your child to school on time, every day. Every minute missed o is a lost learning opportunity! o Read with your child and encourage him/her to read for pleasure. o Check your child’s backpack each evening for homework assignments o and/or communications from the school. o Ask your child what he/she learned at school that day. o Learn about available enrichment opportunities and sign up your o child to take advantage of them. o Attend SPO meetings, open houses and parent-teacher conferences. o Every day, remind your child that he/she must work hard to get o smarter and that you believe in his/her ability to do so. o Check in with your child’s teacher about his/her progress. o Visit a college with your child! …and so many other ways!

22 22 We welcome you! Please return soon. Get involved this summer: Day of Service at Robinson G. Jones School August 2013: Back-to-School Welcome Social

23 23 Appendix: Why is this happening in CMSD right now? According to HB 525, the CEO must identify schools each year in need of corrective action, then decide what corrective action is warranted for each school and when the plan should be implemented. Approximately 6-10 schools will be identified each year to become Investment Schools “Corrective Action” = Investment

24 24 CMSD must accomplish two goals simultaneously Select Year One Investment Schools based on a variety of criteria Collaborate with proven partners to dramatically change schools Engage families and educators at the school level to design high-leverage interventions for each building Prepare to implement effective practices in a subset of high-need schools starting August 2013 Across multiple neighborhoods, engage families and educators in meaningful dialogue Design and communicate a transparent and equitable process for the next three years of CMSD Transformation through Investment Engage the community and conduct in-depth reviews to design an equitable change process

25 25 We examined CMSD schools across multiple criteria Candidate school Academic achievement Culture, teamwork, vision Strong school leaders Motivated, caring teachers Rigorous instruction Social & emotional support for students Family engage- ment School 1 XX X X School 2 X X X X School 3 X X X School 4 X X X X School 5 X X X School 6 X X School 7 X X X School 8 X X School 9 X X X School 10 X X X School 11 X X School 12XXXX

26 26 Selecting the first Investment Schools Review research base and examine multiple criteria RE high-performing, high-poverty schools Stage Two: List of candidate schools reduced to approximately 25 Apply Academic Team knowledge and expertise of individual school contexts across criteria Stage One: Consider ALL underperforming CMSD schools as candidates Deep-dive with CEO and Chiefs to determine district capacity for Quick Win success Stage Three: Final candidate schools selected

27 27 Investing: What is possible in all CMSD Investment Schools? People Time Money Programs Selection of principal for Selection of teachers and staff for Investment Commitment letters to be signed by all staff Pilot CMSD initiatives (student-weighted funding, differentiated compensation) Increased budget autonomy to invest in positions, programs, partners best suited to a specific school Extended instructional time Extended planning/preparation/collaboration time Restructured use of existing time Intensive coaching and professional development to support specific school needs and goals Intentional alignment of student and family supports External supports for programs and operations


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