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Community & Resource Development Project Presentation of Highlights: Youth Ready for Life Survey & Youth and Parent Focus Groups Presented to the NASC.

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Presentation on theme: "Community & Resource Development Project Presentation of Highlights: Youth Ready for Life Survey & Youth and Parent Focus Groups Presented to the NASC."— Presentation transcript:

1 Community & Resource Development Project Presentation of Highlights: Youth Ready for Life Survey & Youth and Parent Focus Groups Presented to the NASC & Evaluation Team By Teresa D. Shattuck, PhD -Shattuck & Associates, Inc.

2 2 Focus Groups Target Groups Target Groups Youth – Middle School (grades 6-8) Youth – Middle School (grades 6-8) Youth – High School (grades 9 & 10) Youth – High School (grades 9 & 10) Parents of youth in grades 6-10 Parents of youth in grades 6-10 Low income Low income Youth-parent pairs were common (same family) Youth-parent pairs were common (same family)

3 3 Focus Groups Locations Interfaith Coalition in Hancock, MD Interfaith Coalition in Hancock, MD Girls, Inc. in Hagerstown, MD Girls, Inc. in Hagerstown, MD Parkside Community Center in Hagerstown, MD Parkside Community Center in Hagerstown, MD Boonsboro, MD (on 1/29/08) Boonsboro, MD (on 1/29/08)

4 4 Focus Groups Format Format Welcome Welcome Dinner: Pizza, fruit salad, drinks Dinner: Pizza, fruit salad, drinks 1 facilitator/1 note taker per group 1 facilitator/1 note taker per group Administer Survey Administer Survey Conduct focus groups Conduct focus groups Interactive “Great Programs” planning session with mix of youth and parents Interactive “Great Programs” planning session with mix of youth and parents Brief sharing of “Great Programs” Brief sharing of “Great Programs” Wrap Up - Thank You and Incentives ($25/youth; $50/adults; $150/host site) Wrap Up - Thank You and Incentives ($25/youth; $50/adults; $150/host site)

5 5 Interfaith Coalition Hancock, MD Hancock, MD November 26 th, 2007 November 26 th, group each: MS Youth (n=7), HS Youth (n=8), and Parents (n=11) 1 group each: MS Youth (n=7), HS Youth (n=8), and Parents (n=11) 7 interactive groups for “Great Programs” planning session 7 interactive groups for “Great Programs” planning session

6 6 Interfaith Coalition - Key Findings Youth place greater emphasis on education then parents Youth place greater emphasis on education then parents Youth had more optimism about their educational futures than did the parents Youth had more optimism about their educational futures than did the parents When asked what activities they would like to participate in, a third of youth expressed interest in “helping others without getting paid” When asked what activities they would like to participate in, a third of youth expressed interest in “helping others without getting paid” When asked what they wanted in the “Great Programs” session, 7 groups working independently selected a recreation center/community center When asked what they wanted in the “Great Programs” session, 7 groups working independently selected a recreation center/community center

7 7 Girls, Inc. Hagerstown, MD Hagerstown, MD November 29 th, 2007 November 29 th, groups: MS Youth (2 groups; n=12), HS Youth (1 group; n=6), and Parents (2 groups; n=18) 5 groups: MS Youth (2 groups; n=12), HS Youth (1 group; n=6), and Parents (2 groups; n=18) 9 interactive groups for “Great Programs” planning session 9 interactive groups for “Great Programs” planning session

8 8 Girls, Inc. - Key Findings Youth placed greater importance and were more optimistic about successfully completing higher education than parents Youth placed greater importance and were more optimistic about successfully completing higher education than parents When asked what activities they would like to participate in, youth expressed interest in “helping others without getting paid” When asked what activities they would like to participate in, youth expressed interest in “helping others without getting paid” In 9 “Great Programs” groups, there was strong interest in a youth center / community center; participants suggested staffing the center with volunteers or community members In 9 “Great Programs” groups, there was strong interest in a youth center / community center; participants suggested staffing the center with volunteers or community members

9 9 Parkside Community Center Hagerstown, MD Hagerstown, MD January 9, 2009 January 9, groups: MS Youth (n=9), HS Youth (n=7), and Parents (n=12) 3 groups: MS Youth (n=9), HS Youth (n=7), and Parents (n=12) 7 interactive groups for “Great Programs” planning session 7 interactive groups for “Great Programs” planning session

10 10 Parkside - Key Findings Parents place greater importance on higher education than youth Parents place greater importance on higher education than youth Youth were more optimistic about successfully completing higher education then parents Youth were more optimistic about successfully completing higher education then parents When asked what activities they would like to participate in, youth expressed the most interest in “being involved in school clubs” followed by “helping others without getting paid” When asked what activities they would like to participate in, youth expressed the most interest in “being involved in school clubs” followed by “helping others without getting paid” When asked what they wanted in the “Great Programs” session, 5 of 7 groups emphasized community based activities with a Positive Youth Development focus When asked what they wanted in the “Great Programs” session, 5 of 7 groups emphasized community based activities with a Positive Youth Development focus

11 11 Focus Groups Common Themes Across Sites Common Themes Across Sites When asked how they spend their time, youth at all sites listed ‘helping out at home’ and ‘hanging out with friends’ (without an adult around) most often When asked how they spend their time, youth at all sites listed ‘helping out at home’ and ‘hanging out with friends’ (without an adult around) most often When parents were asked how youth spent their time, parents at all sites listed ‘having quality time with family’ most often When parents were asked how youth spent their time, parents at all sites listed ‘having quality time with family’ most often

12 12 Ready for Life Youth Survey Developed by WCCP Developed by WCCP Designed to assess youth perceptions of relationships with adults, school, work, health and future Designed to assess youth perceptions of relationships with adults, school, work, health and future Administered primarily in two high schools in Hagerstown in Spring 2007 Administered primarily in two high schools in Hagerstown in Spring 2007 North HS (N=687) North HS (N=687) South HS (N=501) South HS (N=501)

13 13 Ready for Life Survey Demographics Demographics Average age 15.8 years Average age 15.8 years Even split of males and females Even split of males and females 43% had moved at least once in the past 2 yrs 43% had moved at least once in the past 2 yrs Race: 62% white, 16% African American, 6% Hispanic, 3 Asian/Pacific Islander Race: 62% white, 16% African American, 6% Hispanic, 3 Asian/Pacific Islander 85% of kids live with their biological or step parents (~75% for minority youth) 85% of kids live with their biological or step parents (~75% for minority youth)

14 14 Ready for Life Survey Relationships Relationships ‘Close friends’ (mean=2.5) and ‘mother/stepmother’ (2.4) were rated as the most HELPFUL people to talk to about a personal problem (Scale: not at all, somewhat, very) ‘Close friends’ (mean=2.5) and ‘mother/stepmother’ (2.4) were rated as the most HELPFUL people to talk to about a personal problem (Scale: not at all, somewhat, very) ‘Lack of trust,’ ‘anger,’ ‘too busy,’ and ‘making judgments’ were the things checked most often (range 49-56%) when kids were asked what makes relationships with adults difficult ‘Lack of trust,’ ‘anger,’ ‘too busy,’ and ‘making judgments’ were the things checked most often (range 49-56%) when kids were asked what makes relationships with adults difficult ‘Be open-minded’ was the top selection for making relationships between youth and adults easier (67%) ‘Be open-minded’ was the top selection for making relationships between youth and adults easier (67%)

15 15 Ready for Life Survey School School Parent/family support ranked #1 when kids were asked what’s most HELPFUL to them staying in school (2.5) Parent/family support ranked #1 when kids were asked what’s most HELPFUL to them staying in school (2.5) Boring classes were the #1 barrier to staying in school (59%) Boring classes were the #1 barrier to staying in school (59%) Boys were more likely than girls to report that high school was the highest level of education they expected to complete (17% v 12%) Boys were more likely than girls to report that high school was the highest level of education they expected to complete (17% v 12%) Girls were far more likely than boys to expect to get a graduate degree (52% v 37%) Girls were far more likely than boys to expect to get a graduate degree (52% v 37%)

16 16 Ready for Life Survey Work Work 62% of kids report having worked at some point 62% of kids report having worked at some point When asked why they work, respondents indicated to ‘buy things’ (66%), ‘buy a car’ (58%), ‘pay for college’ (47%); 24% said to ‘help their family’ When asked why they work, respondents indicated to ‘buy things’ (66%), ‘buy a car’ (58%), ‘pay for college’ (47%); 24% said to ‘help their family’ No transportation was selected as the biggest barrier to getting a job (71%) No transportation was selected as the biggest barrier to getting a job (71%)

17 17 Ready for Life Survey Health Health 44% are sexually active 44% are sexually active 53% of those that are sexually active do NOT use birth control 53% of those that are sexually active do NOT use birth control About 25% of kids reported ‘ever’ smoking cigarettes or using marijuana About 25% of kids reported ‘ever’ smoking cigarettes or using marijuana ‘Handling stress’ was reported as the predominate health issue facing youth (67%) ‘Handling stress’ was reported as the predominate health issue facing youth (67%) Kids report getting their health information primarily from parents (68%) Kids report getting their health information primarily from parents (68%)

18 18 Ready for Life Survey Future Future 72% of kids reported that they plan to go to college 72% of kids reported that they plan to go to college ‘Money for college’ (76%) and ‘access to well- paying jobs’ (60%) were selected most often as the services/programs that would help them to achieve their goals ‘Money for college’ (76%) and ‘access to well- paying jobs’ (60%) were selected most often as the services/programs that would help them to achieve their goals ‘Money management’ (68%) was selected most often as the skill that would help them achieve their goals ‘Money management’ (68%) was selected most often as the skill that would help them achieve their goals

19 19 Youth Survey: Sub-Group Analyses In order to understand differences among groups, the data was sliced and diced in 4 ways: In order to understand differences among groups, the data was sliced and diced in 4 ways: 1. Gender – to compare male vs female 2. Race – black, white, other 3. Mobility - # of times moved in past 2 years (0-1 time vs 2 or more times) 4. School – North HS vs South HS Your challenge today will be to explore those differences Your challenge today will be to explore those differences

20 20 Summary This presentation skims the surface of the focus group and youth survey data This presentation skims the surface of the focus group and youth survey data Your task in the remainder of this meeting is to take a ‘data dive’ and mine the data for more crucial pieces of information Your task in the remainder of this meeting is to take a ‘data dive’ and mine the data for more crucial pieces of information We’ll accomplish this as a team working in small data groups We’ll accomplish this as a team working in small data groups

21 21 Data Groups We’ll have 8 Data Groups We’ll have 8 Data Groups 3 Focus Groups 3 Focus Groups Interfaith Coalition Interfaith Coalition Girls, Inc. Girls, Inc. Parkside Parkside 5 Youth Survey Groups 5 Youth Survey Groups Overall frequencies Overall frequencies Gender Gender Race Race Mobility Mobility School School

22 22 Data Dive Instructions Step 1: Form groups of 3-5 Step 1: Form groups of 3-5 Collect up your materials – papers, etc. Collect up your materials – papers, etc. Find folks you don’t know very well or don’t normally work with Find folks you don’t know very well or don’t normally work with Comprise your group with individuals from different disciplines (You should all have different colored dots!) Comprise your group with individuals from different disciplines (You should all have different colored dots!) Now find a place for your group to sit together Now find a place for your group to sit together

23 23 Data Dive Instructions Step 2: Step 2: Your group will be given a data assignment Your group will be given a data assignment Your job is to figure out what data is most important and actionable Your job is to figure out what data is most important and actionable Help us weed out info that isn’t useful and surface the info that is (Practical vs. Statistical Significance) Help us weed out info that isn’t useful and surface the info that is (Practical vs. Statistical Significance) Step 3: Assign Roles for Group Members Step 3: Assign Roles for Group Members Group Scribe – 1 person Group Scribe – 1 person Time Keeper – 1 person Time Keeper – 1 person Task Master – 1 person Task Master – 1 person Scouts/Data Hunters – 1-2 people Scouts/Data Hunters – 1-2 people

24 24 Data Dive Instructions Step 4: Sort Through Your Data – (5 min) Step 4: Sort Through Your Data – (5 min) Figure out what you have to review Figure out what you have to review Divide it up if needed Divide it up if needed Step 5: Individually Review the Data (10 min) Step 5: Individually Review the Data (10 min) Complete the Key Findings Worksheet – “Individual Reactions to Data” Complete the Key Findings Worksheet – “Individual Reactions to Data” Zero in on what’s most IMPORTANT Zero in on what’s most IMPORTANT Use your wisdom and experience to make judgments Use your wisdom and experience to make judgments

25 25 Data Dive Instructions Step 6: Talk About What You Found – (25 min) Step 6: Talk About What You Found – (25 min) As a group decide what the key findings are, discuss why they are key, what can be done about them and who needs to be involved As a group decide what the key findings are, discuss why they are key, what can be done about them and who needs to be involved Scribe fill in the “Group Reaction to Data” Handout Scribe fill in the “Group Reaction to Data” Handout Step 7: Prioritize What’s MOST Important (5 min) Step 7: Prioritize What’s MOST Important (5 min) As a group, decide which finding is most important As a group, decide which finding is most important Write that finding on newsprint along with why it’s important, what can be done about it and who needs to be involved Write that finding on newsprint along with why it’s important, what can be done about it and who needs to be involved Report out to the large group Report out to the large group

26 26 Groups Health - Yellow Health - Yellow Education - Green Education - Green Law Enforcement – ( Police, DJS, Courts) - Blue Law Enforcement – ( Police, DJS, Courts) - Blue Non-profit/CBO – Pink Non-profit/CBO – Pink Business - White Business - White Other - Purple Other - Purple


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