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How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person – Part 2 The Five Precepts The Two Acrobats Buddhism and society.

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Presentation on theme: "How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person – Part 2 The Five Precepts The Two Acrobats Buddhism and society."— Presentation transcript:

1 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person – Part 2 The Five Precepts The Two Acrobats Buddhism and society

2 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person – Part 2 The Five Precepts The Two Acrobats Buddhism and society

3 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person – Part 2 The Five Precepts The Two Acrobats Buddhism and society

4 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person – Part 2 The Five Precepts The Two Acrobats Buddhism and society

5 The Five Precepts They are our protection But they are more than that! The Two Acrobats

6 The Five Precepts They are our protection But they are more than that! The Two Acrobats

7 The Five Precepts They are our protection But they are more than that! The Two Acrobats

8 The Five Precepts They are our protection But they are more than that! The Two Acrobats

9 Once upon a time, a master bamboo acrobat and his young assistant began making preparations for a show in the marketplace. It was to be a balancing act, high above the ground and quite dangerous.

10 The Two Acrobats Once upon a time, a master bamboo acrobat and his young assistant began making preparations for a show in the marketplace. It was to be a balancing act, high above the ground and quite dangerous.

11 The Two Acrobats Once upon a time, a master bamboo acrobat and his young assistant began making preparations for a show in the marketplace. It was to be a balancing act, high above the ground and quite dangerous.

12 The Two Acrobats However, they stood to make quite lot of money from the crowd, which had already began to gather excitedly. The master and his assistant began the climb up the wires and poles, high above the crowd.

13 The Two Acrobats However, they stood to make quite lot of money from the crowd, which had already began to gather excitedly. The master and his assistant began the climb up the wires and poles, high above the crowd.

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15 The Two Acrobats The master said to his young assistant, “you watch out for me and I’ll watch out for you.” “Then watching over each other, we’ll perform our acts safely, then come down and receive our rewards.”

16 The Two Acrobats The master said to his young assistant, “you watch out for me and I’ll watch out for you.” “Then watching over each other, we’ll perform our acts safely, then come down and receive our rewards.”

17 The Two Acrobats But the young assistant said, “no master, you watch out for yourself and I’ll watch out for myself.” “Then watching out for ourselves, we’ll perform our acts safely, then come down and receive our rewards.”

18 The Two Acrobats But the young assistant said, “no master, you watch out for yourself and I’ll watch out for myself.” “Then watching out for ourselves, we’ll perform our acts safely, then come down and receive our rewards.”

19 The Two Acrobats So who was right? The master saying to watch out for each other? Or The assistant saying to watch out for themselves?

20 The Two Acrobats So who was right? The master saying to watch out for each other? Or The assistant saying to watch out for themselves?

21 The Two Acrobats So who was right? The master saying to watch out for each other? Or The assistant saying to watch out for themselves?

22 The Two Acrobats The assistant was right. How can we watch out for others if we cannot watch out for ourselves first? We have to watch out for ourselves first, before we can watch out for others.

23 The Two Acrobats The assistant was right. How can we watch out for others if we cannot watch out for ourselves first? We have to watch out for ourselves first, before we can watch out for others.

24 The Two Acrobats The assistant was right. How can we watch out for others if we cannot watch out for ourselves first? We have to watch out for ourselves first, before we can watch out for others.

25 The Two Acrobats And how does one watch after oneself? Through pursuing the practice, through developing it, through devoting oneself to it. This is how when watching after oneself, one watches after others.

26 The Two Acrobats And how does one watch after oneself? Through pursuing the practice, through developing it, through devoting oneself to it. This is how when watching after oneself, one watches after others.

27 The Two Acrobats And how does one watch after oneself? Through pursuing the practice, through developing it, through devoting oneself to it. This is how when watching after oneself, one watches after others.

28 The Two Acrobats And how does one watch after others? Through harmlessness and compassion, and kindness and sympathy. This is how when watching after others, one watches after oneself.

29 The Two Acrobats And how does one watch after others? Through harmlessness and compassion, and kindness and sympathy. This is how when watching after others, one watches after oneself.

30 The Two Acrobats And how does one watch after others? Through harmlessness and compassion, and kindness and sympathy. This is how when watching after others, one watches after oneself.

31 The Two Acrobats The Buddha : When watching after oneself, one watches after others. When watching after others, one watches after oneself.

32 The Two Acrobats The Buddha : When watching after oneself, one watches after others. When watching after others, one watches after oneself.

33 The Two Acrobats The Buddha : When watching after oneself, one watches after others. When watching after others, one watches after oneself.

34 The Two Acrobats The Buddha : When watching after oneself, one watches after others. When watching after others, one watches after oneself. Sedaka Sutta : The Bamboo Acrobat Samyutta Nikaya 47.19

35 The Five Precepts They are our protection But they are more than that! They are the protection of others too.

36 The Five Precepts They are our protection But they are more than that! They are the protection of others too.

37 The Five Precepts They are our protection But they are more than that! They are the protection of others too.

38 The Five Precepts They are our protection But they are more than that! They are the protection of others too.

39 The Five Protective Precepts 1. Abstain from harming and killing 2. Abstain from taking what is not given 3. Abstain from sexual misconduct 4. Abstain from lying and false speech 5. Abstain from abuse of intoxicants and drugs

40 The Five Protective Precepts 1. The safety and lives of all beings 2. Abstain from taking what is not given 3. Abstain from sexual misconduct 4. Abstain from lying and false speech 5. Abstain from abuse of intoxicants and drugs

41 The Five Protective Precepts 1. The safety and lives of all beings 2. The livelihood and possessions of others 3. Abstain from sexual misconduct 4. Abstain from lying and false speech 5. Abstain from abuse of intoxicants and drugs

42 The Five Protective Precepts 1. The safety and lives of all beings 2. The livelihood and possessions of others 3. The happiness and unity of families 4. Abstain from lying and false speech 5. Abstain from abuse of intoxicants and drugs

43 The Five Protective Precepts 1. The safety and lives of all beings 2. The livelihood and possessions of others 3. The happiness and unity of families 4. The integrity and security of society 5. Abstain from abuse of intoxicants and drugs

44 The Five Protective Precepts 1. The safety and lives of all beings 2. The livelihood and possessions of others 3. The happiness and unity of families 4. The integrity and security of society 5. All of the above!

45 Buddhism and society Never a ‘one-way’ street. There are always reciprocal responsibilities between people, groups of people and society as a whole too.

46 Buddhism and society Never a ‘one-way’ street. There are always reciprocal responsibilities between people, groups of people and society as a whole too.

47 The Sigalovada Sutta The Code of Ethics for Lay People The Buddha’s Guide to Peace and Happiness

48 The Sigalovada Sutta The Code of Ethics for Lay People The Buddha’s Guide to Peace and Happiness

49 The Sigalovada Sutta Children and Parents How children should treat their parents By supporting their parents when necessary By helping them in their business, at work, or in any other appropriate ways By keeping the family together By being worthy of their inheritance By doing charitable acts in memory of departed parents and relatives

50 The Sigalovada Sutta Children and Parents How parents should treat their children By restraining their children from doing wrong By encouraging them to do what is right By having them trained in a profession By helping or giving advice in the choice of a suitable marriage partner By handing over their inheritance at a proper time

51 The Sigalovada Sutta Children and Parents How parents should treat their children By restraining their children from doing wrong By encouraging them to do what is right By having them trained in a profession By helping or giving advice in the choice of a suitable marriage partner By handing over their inheritance at a proper time

52 For Buddhist parents As Buddhist parents, or parents-to-be, we have a duty to bring our children on to the correct path as soon as possible. Avoid them straying on to the wrong path. Train them to cultivate good habits from young. They will then grow up into responsible and mature adults. It will then be easier for them to practice the Dhamma as they grow older.

53 For Buddhist parents As Buddhist parents, or parents-to-be, we have a duty to bring our children on to the correct path as soon as possible. Avoid them straying on to the wrong path. Train them to cultivate good habits from young. They will then grow up into responsible and mature adults. It will then be easier for them to practice the Dhamma as they grow older.

54 For Buddhist parents As Buddhist parents, or parents-to-be, we have a duty to bring our children on to the correct path as soon as possible. Avoid them straying on to the wrong path. Train them to cultivate good habits from young. They will then grow up into responsible and mature adults. It will then be easier for them to practice the Dhamma as they grow older.

55 For Buddhist parents As Buddhist parents, or parents-to-be, we have a duty to bring our children on to the correct path as soon as possible. Avoid them straying on to the wrong path. Train them to cultivate good habits from young. They will then grow up into responsible and mature adults. It will then be easier for them to practice the Dhamma as they grow older.

56 For Buddhist parents As Buddhist parents, or parents-to-be, we have a duty to bring our children on to the correct path as soon as possible. Avoid them straying on to the wrong path. Train them to cultivate good habits from young. They will then grow up into responsible and mature adults. It will then be easier for them to practice the Dhamma as they grow older.

57 For Buddhist parents When our children stay out of trouble, we parents also have less trouble! We have to point out the similarities and differences between Buddhism and the other religions. This is necessary for their own knowledge. This will also allow them to make their own decisions regarding which religion to eventually follow, in an educated way and with a clear mind.

58 For Buddhist parents When our children stay out of trouble, we parents also have less trouble! We have to point out the similarities and differences between Buddhism and the other religions. This is necessary for their own knowledge. This will also allow them to make their own decisions regarding which religion to eventually follow, in an educated way and with a clear mind.

59 For Buddhist parents All faiths are similar in that they preach goodness and love. However, the emphasis and approach taken by the different religions can be very different. These are some points to consider bringing to the attention of our children :

60 For Buddhist parents 1. Being a good person as opposed to blind faith and worship Some religions usually place blind faith and worship above and beyond everything else. For example, being a good person is less important than faith and worship. This is because being a good person will not lead to heaven if that person is not of the same religion. For some religions, only faith and worship according to that religion will lead to heaven. Everyone else, good or bad, goes to hell according to those religions.

61 For Buddhist parents 1. Being a good person as opposed to blind faith and worship Some religions usually place blind faith and worship above and beyond everything else. For example, being a good person is less important than faith and worship. This is because being a good person will not lead to heaven if that person is not of the same religion. For some religions, only faith and worship according to that religion will lead to heaven. Everyone else, good or bad, goes to hell according to those religions.

62 For Buddhist parents Buddhism on the other hand, places a person’s behaviour above and beyond faith and worship. Being a good person is more important in Buddhism. Faith and worship is secondary in Buddhism, and blind faith and unthinking worship is discouraged. Asking questions to gain knowledge, and direct experience to gain understanding, is what Buddhism encourages.

63 For Buddhist parents 2. Unconditional love as opposed to conditional love Many religions have the concept that they must belong to and have absolute and unquestioning faith in that particular religion before they are saved by their god, who is supposed to be loving and compassionate. If not, they will be punished by that god in an eternal hell. This is ‘conditional love’ and not really true love or compassion as there are conditions or ‘strings’ attached.

64 For Buddhist parents 2. Unconditional love as opposed to conditional love Many religions have the concept that they must belong to and have absolute and unquestioning faith in that particular religion before they are saved by their god, who is supposed to be loving and compassionate. If not, they will be punished by that god in an eternal hell. This is ‘conditional love’ and not really true love or compassion as there are conditions or ‘strings’ attached.

65 For Buddhist parents Buddhism on the other hand, teaches unconditional love or compassion - Metta. This is the kind of love that a mother has for her child. No matter what her child does or turns out to be, she will always love that child. This is the kind of love and compassion that Buddhism encourages us to have, unconditional and without any ‘strings’ attached, and to be practiced towards all beings without exception.

66 For Buddhist parents 3. Tolerance as opposed to intolerance Several religions are highly ‘exclusive’ in nature. For example, followers of these religions forbid or strongly discourage their followers from : Reading books or learning about other religions; Visiting places of worship of other religions; Attending wakes or funerals of other religions; Mixing around with people from other religions.

67 For Buddhist parents 3. Tolerance as opposed to intolerance Several religions are highly ‘exclusive’ in nature. For example, followers of these religions forbid or strongly discourage their followers from : Reading books or learning about other religions; Visiting places of worship of other religions; Attending wakes or funerals of other religions; Mixing around with people from other religions.

68 For Buddhist parents 3. Tolerance as opposed to intolerance Several religions are highly ‘exclusive’ in nature. For example, followers of these religions forbid or strongly discourage their followers from : Reading books or learning about other religions; Visiting places of worship of other religions; Attending wakes or funerals of other religions; Mixing around with people from other religions.

69 For Buddhist parents 3. Tolerance as opposed to intolerance Several religions are highly ‘exclusive’ in nature. For example, followers of these religions forbid or strongly discourage their followers from : Reading books or learning about other religions; Visiting places of worship of other religions; Attending wakes or funerals of other religions; Mixing around with people from other religions.

70 For Buddhist parents 3. Tolerance as opposed to intolerance Several religions are highly ‘exclusive’ in nature. For example, followers of these religions forbid or strongly discourage their followers from : Reading books or learning about other religions; Visiting places of worship of other religions; Attending wakes or funerals of other religions; Mixing around with people from other religions.

71 For Buddhist parents 3. Tolerance as opposed to intolerance Several religions are highly ‘exclusive’ in nature. For example, followers of these religions forbid or strongly discourage their followers from : Reading books or learning about other religions; Visiting places of worship of other religions; Attending wakes or funerals of other religions; Mixing around with people from other religions.

72 For Buddhist parents Buddhism however, does not have any such restrictions and in fact, learning about other religions is encouraged, and even occasionally participating in their activities is fine. In this way, a greater understanding of other religions is acquired and also, social harmony and cohesiveness is maintained.

73 For Buddhist parents 4. Open-minded teachings as opposed to dogmatic beliefs A few religions preach highly dogmatic beliefs such that modern science and knowledge is taught as false, because they contradict the teachings in their ancient books. These religions teach that only what is contained in their books is true and everything else is false, despite all the evidence to the contrary from modern science and hard facts.

74 For Buddhist parents 4. Open-minded teachings as opposed to dogmatic beliefs A few religions preach highly dogmatic beliefs such that modern science and knowledge is taught as false, because they contradict the teachings in their ancient books. These religions teach that only what is contained in their books is true and everything else is false, despite all the evidence to the contrary from modern science and hard facts.

75 For Buddhist parents Buddhism on the other hand, is open and adaptable and in fact, very much in harmony with modern science. For example, while some religions preach that everything is created by a god and that evolution is false, Buddhism recognizes the scientific evidence and hard facts of evolution. Buddhism does not seek to twist or distort modern science and knowledge to suit its teachings. What is important in Buddhism is the truth, and the ability to see and understand the reality of nature and of our existence.

76 For Buddhist parents If we, as Buddhist parents do not make the effort to teach our children our own religion, then we are effectively just stepping aside to allow people of other religions to teach our own children their religion.

77 For Buddhist parents However, we must also do our part as Buddhist parents by : Learning the Buddha’s teachings Practicing the Buddha’s teachings Being the example we want our children to follow

78 For Buddhist parents However, we must also do our part as Buddhist parents by : Learning the Buddha’s teachings Practicing the Buddha’s teachings Being the example we want our children to follow

79 For Buddhist parents However, we must also do our part as Buddhist parents by : Learning the Buddha’s teachings Practicing the Buddha’s teachings Being the example we want our children to follow

80 For Buddhist parents However, we must also do our part as Buddhist parents by : Learning the Buddha’s teachings Practicing the Buddha’s teachings Being the example we want our children to follow

81 For Buddhist parents Lastly, a good way to politely decline followers of other religions trying to convert us or our children, is to say that we will go their place of worship or listen to them, providing they also visit our temple or listen to us tell them about the Buddha’s teachings.

82 The Sigalovada Sutta Students and Teachers How students should treat their teachers By showing their teachers proper respect By attending to their needs By personal service to them By being eager to learn By paying careful attention when being taught

83 The Sigalovada Sutta Students and Teachers How teachers should treat their students By training their students to develop self-discipline By teaching them so that they understand the lessons well By giving them a well-balanced education By introducing them to friends and colleagues By helping to ensure their safety and well-being

84 The Sigalovada Sutta Husbands and Wives How a husband should treat his wife By treating her with courtesy By showing her respect By being faithful to her By sharing authority of the household with her By providing her with jewellery and gifts

85 The Sigalovada Sutta Husbands and Wives How a wife should treat her husband By properly organizing the household By being hospitable to in-laws, and treating household workers well By being faithful to him By helping to preserve the family wealth By being skilful and diligent in her duties

86 The Sigalovada Sutta Friends and Associates How one should treat friends and associates By being generous and willing to share By speaking with kind words By being helpful By being impartial and unbiased By being sincere and honest

87 The Sigalovada Sutta Friends and Associates How friends and associates should treat each other By taking care of each other when they are vulnerable By protecting their property when they are vulnerable By being a refuge in times of fear or danger By not abandoning them in times of need By respecting and showing consideration for their family

88 The Sigalovada Sutta Employers and Employees How employers should treat their employees By assigning their employees work according to their abilities By paying them adequately for their work By looking after their medical needs By giving them special treats By allowing them leave and holidays

89 The Sigalovada Sutta Employers and Employees How employees should treat their employers By arriving early for work By staying late when necessary By taking only what is given By doing their job well By upholding and spreading the good reputation of their employer

90 The Sigalovada Sutta Spiritual teachers and Lay followers How lay followers should treat their spiritual teachers By kind actions By kind speech By kind thoughts By keeping their house open to them By providing them with material needs

91 The Sigalovada Sutta Spiritual teachers and Lay followers How spiritual teachers should treat their lay followers By restraining them from doing wrong By encouraging them to do what is right By showing them compassion By teaching them what they do not know By clarifying what has been taught By showing them the way and guiding them in spiritual practice

92 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person The Buddha recognized that not everyone is ready, or even suited for a life centred on intensive spiritual practice. Most are content with being part of a household, running their businesses, taking part in social activities and having a good time. He said that there is nothing wrong with people enjoying their families, their material possessions and taking pleasure in life.

93 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person The Buddha recognized that not everyone is ready, or even suited for a life centred on intensive spiritual practice. Most are content with being part of a household, running their businesses, taking part in social activities and having a good time. He said that there is nothing wrong with people enjoying their families, their material possessions and taking pleasure in life.

94 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person The Buddha recognized that not everyone is ready, or even suited for a life centred on intensive spiritual practice. Most are content with being part of a household, running their businesses, taking part in social activities and having a good time. He said that there is nothing wrong with people enjoying their families, their material possessions and taking pleasure in life.

95 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person The Buddha recognized that not everyone is ready, or even suited for a life centred on intensive spiritual practice. Most are content with being part of a household, running their businesses, taking part in social activities and having a good time. He said that there is nothing wrong with people enjoying their families, their material possessions and taking pleasure in life.

96 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person However, he stressed that the pursuit of our own happiness should not be at the expense of others. Such happiness will be short-lived and lead ultimately to our own suffering. By helping and bringing happiness unconditionally to others, our own happiness will not only be preserved, but maintained for a long time to come.

97 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person However, he stressed that the pursuit of our own happiness should not be at the expense of others. Such happiness will be short-lived and lead ultimately to our own suffering. By helping and bringing happiness unconditionally to others, our own happiness will not only be preserved, but maintained for a long time to come.

98 How to practice Buddhism as a Lay Person However, he stressed that the pursuit of our own happiness should not be at the expense of others. Such happiness will be short-lived and lead ultimately to our own suffering. By helping and bringing happiness unconditionally to others, our own happiness will not only be preserved, but maintained for a long time to come.

99 Prepared by T Y Lee www.justbegood.net


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