Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Religious Studies GCSE 2009- Delivering the new specification in September 2009 Unit 4.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Religious Studies GCSE 2009- Delivering the new specification in September 2009 Unit 4."— Presentation transcript:

1 Religious Studies GCSE Delivering the new specification in September 2009 Unit 4

2 Aim of Event During the course of the session delegates will: understand the assessment implications of the new specification be taken through the impact of the changes to the new specification have the opportunity to explore delivery strategies applicable to the new specification learn about the total package and how it will help you achieve better results

3 The session will consist of two parts Part ONE 1.Changes in the questions 2.Changes in the marking process 3.Technical advice for candidates when taking the paper. Part TWO 1.Differences in the specification content

4 Part ONE The assessment and marking of the new specification.

5 The assessment implications of the new specification The specification which can be examined for the first time in 2010 has new assessment objectives. GCSE RS now has to assess 50% of AO1 and 50% of AO2. This means: AO1 = Describe, explain and analyse using knowledge and understanding AO2 = Use evidence and reasoned argument to express and evaluate personal responses, informed insights and differing viewpoints

6 Which questions are aimed at the different assessment objectives? Look at the layout of the new questions AO1 – Will be assessed in the a) and c) questions AO2 – Will be assessed in the b) and d) questions

7 Changes to the ways marks are awarded in the mark scheme a) Questions ( no change from the old specification) These questions are based on the Keywords Glossary which is Appendix 4 in the specification ( Pages ) Usually they take one of two forms Either asking for a definition of the word OR asking for an example of the word 2 marks are available. 1 mark is awarded for a partially correct answer and 2 for a fully correct answer

8 b) Questions (changed from the old specification ) These questions now assess AO2 not AO1 so they are asking for evaluation of issues, beliefs and teachings The b) questions ask candidates to provide TWO reasons for their own point of view Candidates can either give: two reasons agreeing with the statement, two reasons disagreeing with the statement or say they are unsure and give two reasons either side. ALERT.. candidates should not give three reasons or answer this in the old d) format.

9 c) Questions (very similar to old specification) Questions have not changed from the old specification, students will be asked to show they can apply the knowledge and show understanding.

10 Marking (c) questions Marks will be awarded singly i.e. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 (rather than in pairs 2,4,6,8) In this sub-question marks will be awarded for Quality of Written Communication (QWC) This means students must try to answer the c) questions in clear English spelling words correctly, using sentences and paragraphs and making use of specialist vocabulary

11 c) Levels and marking In c) sub-questions the level will be awarded according to the Religious Studies content, the mark within the level will then be decided by the QWC The levels are essentially Level 1 – Little understanding of the issue Level 2 - Basic understanding of the issue Level 3 – A more developed understanding of the issue Level 4 – A clear understanding of the issue

12 d) Questions have changed. The stimulus quote is retained. This is intended to be controversial and provoke arguments for and against the point of view stated, it does not matter which view the candidate holds about the quote as long as they can justify this with reasons. The d) sub-question is now divided to help candidates focus on the stimulus. For each stimulus candidates are asked i) Do you agree? Give reasons for your answer ii) Give reasons why some people may disagree with you

13 Marks for d) The d) sub-question is marked out of 6 over all, but this is split into two parts of 3 marks. This is very different from the old specification which gave 4 marks overall. This reflects the increased weighting on AO2 ALERT - when teaching candidates to answer this question they must split the for and against arguments into the (i) and (ii) parts. If they mix the two in one answer they will not gain all the marks available.

14 d) Marking In d questions each sub-question will be marked completely separately Each part (i) and (ii) have 3 marks and will be marked 1 mark = a simple reason 2 marks = a developed reason OR two simple reasons 3 marks = a fully developed reason OR two developed OR three simple reasons

15 Activity One - Discussion Were you aware of the changes to the assessment objectives? The 50% weighting towards AO2? As far as your teaching is concerned, what impact might this have? What sort of things will you have to consider when approaching the issues? Do you have a clear understanding on how to mark the new questions and what skills the candidates will need to answer them?

16 Part TWO Content changes in the specification.

17 Dont throw everything away! There is more similarities than differences in content

18 Content changes in the specification The most obvious change is the loss of section five. The paper is now split into four sections and there is no coursework. Parts of what was section five can now be found in the four new sections. Religion in the media is now a thread throughout the whole specification. This encourages teachers to use media to explore the issues rather than tagging it on at the end.

19 QUESTIONS SECTION ONE

20 Section one - believing in Allah. The old How religious upbringing in a Muslim family and community can lead to or support belief in Allah. The nature of religious experience for Muslims, as seen in the numinous, conversion, miracles, prayer, and how these may lead to or support belief in Allah. How the appearance of the world (design and causation) may lead to or support belief in Allah. How the search for meaning and purpose in life may lead to or support belief in Allah. How the presence of religion in the world may lead to or support belief in Allah. How non-religious explanations of the world and of miracles may lead to or support agnosticism or atheism. How unanswered prayers and the existence of evil and suffering (including moral evil and natural evil) may lead people to question or reject belief in Allah. Why the existence of evil and suffering raises problems for people who believe in Allah as omnipotent, benevolent and omniscient. How Muslims respond to this problem. The new The main features of a Muslim upbringing and how this might lead to belief in Allah. How religious experience, as seen in the numinous, conversion, miracles and prayer, may lead to belief in Allah. The argument from causation and how it may, or may not, lead to belief in Allah. Why scientific explanations of the origins of the world may lead some people not to believe in Allah. How Muslims respond to scientific explanations of the origins of the world. Why unanswered prayers may lead some people not to believe in Allah. How Muslims respond to the problem of unanswered prayers. Why evil and suffering many lead some people not to believe in Allah. How Muslims respond to the problem of evil and suffering. How two television and/or radio programmes and/or films about religion might affect a persons attitude to belief in Allah.

21 The media bullet point – believing in Allah. Examples could be: specifically religious programmes that might encourage or discourage belief in Allah. For example, documentaries about a religious group. a story on a TV soap opera which is particularly supportive of religious beliefs or could put off non-believers. The emphasis being on how the fictional stories can be believed as true. a secular programme exploring the wonder of the universe for example David Attenboroughs Life in Cold blood. It is possible that this non-religious programme presents the wonders of the universe in such away that the viewer is convinced that the world could not just have happened by accident (this can be linked to the work on design and causation) the way that religious people are presented in general in programmes such as Eastenders and how this might put some people off belief in Allah. the way Allah is represented in films

22 OVER TO YOU – activity two The (a) questions from this topic could be…. Make up three examples.

23 QUESTIONS SECTION TWO

24 Section Two - matters of life and death The old Differences among Muslims in their attitudes to life after death. Why Muslims believe in life after death. Reasons for belief in life after death not specific to any religion including near-death experiences and the paranormal. Why some people do not believe in life after death. The nature of abortion, including current British legislation and non-religious arguments concerning abortion. Different Muslim attitudes to abortion and the reasons for those attitudes. Differences among Muslims in their attitudes to contraception, and the reasons for them. The nature of euthanasia (assisted suicide, voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia), including current British legislation and arguments concerning euthanasia. Differences among Muslims in their attitudes to euthanasia and the reasons for them. The new Why Muslims believe in life after death and how beliefs about life after death affect their lives. Non-religious reasons for believing in life after death (near death experiences, ghosts, mediums, evidence of reincarnation). Why some people do not believe in life after death. The nature of abortion, including British legislation, and why abortion is a controversial issue. Different Muslim attitudes to abortion and the reasons for them. The nature of euthanasia,, including British legislation, and why euthanasia is a controversial issue. Muslim attitudes to euthanasia and the reasons for them. Arguments for and against the media being free to criticise what religions say about matters of life and death. The causes of world poverty How and why one Muslim agency is trying to end world poverty. How an issue raised from matters of life and death has been presented in one form of media, for example a television or radio programme, or in a film, or in the national daily press; including whether the treatment was fair to religious beliefs and religious people.

25 Poverty and a Muslim organisation bullet points. Examples could be Muslim Aid Islamic Relief However, it is important to note it is about world poverty. Not work in the UK. The media bullet points – section two There are two areas of study here the media and its right to criticise religion/religious belief the treatment of life after death, abortion, euthanasia and poverty in the media. Examples could be life after death – a film such as Ghost – it does not have to be specifically Muslim abortion – soap storylines or press coverage euthanasia – Whose life is it anyway? or press coverage poverty – press coverage, news reports, fundraising TV programmes. The emphasis on the treatment being fair or unfair

26 OVER TO YOU The (b) questions for this topic could be……. Make up three examples.

27 QUESTIONS SECTION THREE

28 Section three – marriage and the family The old Changing attitudes in the United Kingdom to cohabitation and marriage. The purposes of marriage in Islam, including the main features of a Muslim marriage ceremony. Differences among Muslims in their attitudes to sex outside marriage (premarital sex, promiscuity and adultery), including the reasons for the attitudes. Changing attitudes to divorce in the United Kingdom. Differences among Muslims in their attitudes to divorce (including re-marriage) including the reasons for the attitudes. Changing attitudes to homosexuality in the United Kingdom. Different Muslim attitudes to homosexuality, including the reasons for the attitudes. The changing nature of family life (nuclear family, extended family, re-constituted family) in the United Kingdom. The teachings of Islam on family life and its importance. How mosques help with the upbringing of children and keeping the family together. The new Changing attitudes to marriage, divorce, family life and homosexuality in the UK and the reasons for them. Muslim attitudes to sex outside of marriage and the reasons for them. The purpose of marriage in Islam and how this is shown in the wedding ceremony. Different Muslim attitudes to divorce and the reasons for them. Muslim attitudes to homosexuality and the reasons for them. Muslim teachings on family life and its importance. How mosques help with the upbringing of children. How mosques keep the family together. Different methods of contraception and the reasons for them. Different Muslim attitudes to contraception and the reasons for them. How an issue arising from marriage and family life has been presented in one form of media, for example television or programme, or in a film, or in the national daily press; including whether the treatment was fair or unfair to religious people.

29 The media bullet point – marriage and family life Note here that in sections 2-4 only ONE example is needed. In section three examples could be; East is East The Masood family in Eastenders Various soap storylines about family, sex before marriage, homosexuality, divorce etc. HOWEVER Note that the emphasis on whether the treatment was fair to religious beliefs and religious people.

30 Over to you… The (c) questions from this topic could be… Make up three examples.

31 QUESTIONS SECTION FOUR

32 Section four – religion and community cohesion (was social harmony) The old The growth of equal rights for women in the United Kingdom. Differences among Muslims in their attitudes to the roles of men and women, including the role of women in religion, and the reasons for them (equality and sexism). The nature of the United Kingdom as a multi- ethnic society, including prejudice, racism and discrimination. The teachings of Islam which help to promote racial harmony, The contribution of ONE modern Muslim person or organisation to racial harmony, and the Islamic basis for this work. The quality, variety and richness of life in the United Kingdom as a multi-faith society, including considerations of religious freedom and religious pluralism. Differences among Muslims in their attitudes to other religions (exclusivism, inclusivism, pluralism) and the reasons for them. The new How and why attitudes to the roles of men and women have changed in the UK. Different Muslim attitudes to equal rights for women in religion and the reasons for them. The nature of the UK as a multi-ethnic society, including the problems of discrimination and racism. Government action to promote community cohesion in the UK, including legislation on equal rights for ethnic minorities and religions. The work of a Muslim organisation to help asylum seekers and/or immigrant workers in the UK, including the reasons for the work and its importance and significance. Why Muslims should help to promote racial harmony. Differences amongst Muslims in their attitudes to other religions (exclusivism, inlcusivism, pluralism) The UK as a multi-faith society, including the benefits of living in a multi-faith society. Issues raised fro religion by a multi-faith society – conversion, bringing up children, interfaith marriages. Ways in which religions work to promote community cohesion. An issue in the media – fair or unfair to religious people.

33 Community cohesion -Government action to promote community cohesion in the UK, including legislation on equal rights for ethnic minorities and religions. There is quite a lot of information on this on websites and your schools should have a community cohesion policy. It is now a statutory thing for all schools to promote. The LA will also have an equality and diversity officer who can provide you with more information, if needed. The selection of new text books also cover this in enough detail.

34 The work of a Muslim organisation to help asylum seekers and/or immigrant workers in the UK, including the reasons for the work and its importance and significance This will involve investigating groups that do this work in the UK. e.g. The Islamic Cultural Centre and The London Central Mosque. There are many myths around about asylum seekers and immigrant workers and this is an opportunity for us to challenge these and contribute to the schools duty to promote community cohesion.

35 Over to you… The (d) questions from this section could be.. Make up three examples.

36 Part three Last minute things to note.

37 Final points! Candidates need to use a BLACK pen. Candidates need to choose one question, from each section, and mark this with an X at the top of the answer page. They must not swap questions half way through the answer. There is more space than needed to answer the questions – BUT if more space is needed on (b), for example, cross out the (c) and keep writing. When the candidate needs to start (c) then write (c) and answer that … and so on… if more space is still needed use the pages at the back. ONLY IN EXTREME CIRCUMSTANCES USE ADDITIONAL PAPER. Candidates should not write outside the box! Any others…….???

38 What are we doing to help you? GCSE Specification & Accessible Assessment Stay alert e-Spec ResultsPlus Ask the Expert Curriculum Development Managers Dedicated lines Regional Offices Ask Edexcel Training from Edexcel Support for Controlled Assessment Published Resources eg Activity Guide

39 Thank you for taking part today


Download ppt "Religious Studies GCSE 2009- Delivering the new specification in September 2009 Unit 4."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google