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1 Problem-Solving Styles: Individual Preferences for Working on Challenging Tasks or Managing Change From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby,

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Presentation on theme: "1 Problem-Solving Styles: Individual Preferences for Working on Challenging Tasks or Managing Change From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby,"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Problem-Solving Styles: Individual Preferences for Working on Challenging Tasks or Managing Change From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel Robin Schumaker Coordinator, Office of Gifted Education Virginia Beach City Public Schools

2 2 People say… From the work of Donald J. Treffinger I really enjoy doing things on the cutting edge. I really enjoy making things work better. Bouncing ideas off others helps me think. I think best alone. I like to make sure everyone is on board. I like to make sure we get a logical result.

3 3 Problem-Solving Styles Problem-solving styles refer to the ways that individuals find most comfortable as they work on new and challenging tasks and deal with change. From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel

4 4 A persons problem- solving style might be likened in some ways to handedness. From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel

5 5 Problem-Solving Styles Are: Problem-Solving Styles are NOT: Natural (everyone has a style) Neutral (no right or wrong style Comfortable (the ways your prefer) Stable (dont change rapidly) Strengths (how you can be your best) Fixed, inflexible (people can adapt) Measures of abilities Rules for how to behave Faults (things you cant do well) From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel

6 6 Three Problem-Solving Style Dimensions: Orientation to Change- individual preferences for responding to new ideas, structure, and authority when dealing with change or solving problems Manner of Processing- individual preferences for how and when you use your own inner energy, the energy of others, resources, and the environment Decision Making- individual preferences for balancing and emphasizing task concerns and personal or intrapersonal needs From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel

7 7 Problem-Solving Style Survey Circle the statements that sound most like your child. My child prefers to … be spontaneous and free-flowing. look for novel ideas and enjoys finding new and original options. work away from direct supervision, rules, and guidelines. use a methodical, precise, and efficient approach to tasks and situations focus on a detailed, well-organized, and carefully structured approach. work with the guidance of people in authority. share thinking in its early stages and seeks input interactively from others through discussion. work in environments with noise and sound. seek a great deal of input from others (from within or outside the group) before reaching closure. look to their own inner thoughts, carefully considering ideas first before being ready to share them with others. work in a quiet environment free from distractions. reflect and think deeply in solitude as they weigh options carefully and thoroughly. Based on the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel

8 8 Problem-Solving Style Survey Circle the statements that sound most like your child. My child prefers to … seek decisions that all involved can buy into. consider problems and challenges with initial emphasis on human impact. ensure that people are comfortable before acting on decisions. seek decisions that will achieve the desired outcome. consider problems and challenges with initial emphasis on what is logical and rational. ensure that decisions are defensible on the basis of evidence and sound analysis. ExplorerDeveloper External processor Internal processor Person- focused Task- focused …………………………………………………………………..... …………………………………………………………………... ………………………………………………………………..

9 9 Each dimension is anchored by two clear, but seemingly opposite, styles. Orientation to Change Manner of Processing Decision MakingPerson- focusedTask- focused External processors From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel Internal processors ExplorersDevelopers

10 10 Explorers prefer to: do things better find benefit in support and structure work within the stated rules. be seen as precise, thorough, and dependable emphasize improvement and usefulness Developers prefer to: Orientation to Change From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel do things differently view structure as limiting and confining challenge authority, bend the rules. be seen as unconventional emphasize originality

11 11 Manner of Processing: External processors are more likely to… Internal processors are more likely to… look deeply into the task(s) upon which the group is focused work to polish and complete new ideas until they are ready to share reflect and think deeply enjoy and get energy from working alone or with a few others help external people to listen From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel look outside group context for different perspectives and input act and respond quickly enjoy and get energy from working with others initiate communication with others draw the thoughts of more internal people out in the open

12 12 Decision Making: Person - focused decision makers prefer to… Task- focused decision makers prefer to… promote harmony and positive interpersonal relationships use criteria that are personal, sensitive to feelings, and more subjective consider the personal impact or consequences of a decision seek options that all people involved can buy into put peoples feelings over the quality of the outcome focus on what is logical or rational use criteria that are authoritative, verifiable, and more objective consider standards, rigor, or quality seek the best solution or response put the quality of the outcome over peoples feelings From the work of Donald J. Treffinger, Edwin C. Selby, Scott G. Isaksen, and James H. Crumel

13 13 Discussion: In what ways might each distinct problem-solving style add value and provide challenges to problem-solving teams?

14 14 Implications for individuals, teams, or groups of individuals who need to work together successfully in an effort to solve problems and build constructive working relationships

15 15 Based on the work of Donald J. Treffinger Ideas for consideration: Orientation to Change Provide explorers the opportunity to seek novelty and generate many new ideas in an environment that fosters the freedom to create Provide developers the opportunity to refine and enhance ideas, and form them into more complete, functional, and useful outcomes Manner of Processing Provide adequate time and space for internal processors to reflect on their ideas. Provide time for external processors to talk and share ideas with others, especially ideas that are in their infancy stage Decision Making Provide individuals with a person- focused style the opportunity to consider the personal or intrapersonal impact or consequences of a decision Provide individuals with a task- focused style the opportunity to examine and share the logical implications of decisions

16 16 it allows for recognition and understanding of personal strengths. it can lead to an appreciation for style diversity and the information can be used to build and function well in high performing teams. it provides an opportunity to manage behavior carefully and deliberately communication approaches can be modified when it is necessary to collaborate with others. Based on the work of Donald J. Treffinger Having an understanding of an individuals preferred problem-solving styles is valuable in that…


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