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CUBE: Urban Advocacy Skills Building How to Tell the Urban Public Education Story: An Important Tool for Successful Advocacy.

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Presentation on theme: "CUBE: Urban Advocacy Skills Building How to Tell the Urban Public Education Story: An Important Tool for Successful Advocacy."— Presentation transcript:

1 CUBE: Urban Advocacy Skills Building How to Tell the Urban Public Education Story: An Important Tool for Successful Advocacy

2 KATHLEEN BRANCH DEBORAH RIGSBY Presenters:

3 Agenda Why should you create your own urban public education advocacy story? How do you create your own urban public education advocacy story? How do you convey your story using local impact data? Resources available to you Orange County Board of Education Questions & answers

4 WHY SHOULD YOU CREATE YOUR OWN URBAN PUBLIC EDUCATION ADVOCACY STORY?

5 1.HELPS PUBLICIZE YOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT & ITS SUCCESSES 2.SERVES AS AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL FOR YOU, YOUR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS & YOUR COMMUNITY 3.TO BUILD SUPPORT FOR LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES

6 HOW SHOULD YOU CREATE YOUR OWN URBAN PUBLIC EDUCATION ADVOCACY STORY?

7 1. GET YOUR BOARD ON BOARD 2. DETERMINE YOUR DISTRICT’S GOALS FOR CREATING YOUR STORY 3. DECIDE THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS YOU WANT INCLUDED IN YOUR STORY 4. DETERMINE WHAT LOCAL IMPACT DATA WILL STRENGTHEN YOUR CASE 5. CREATE A COMMUNICATIONS PLAN The Basics

8 COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES CAN BE USED AT EVERY LEVEL OF GOVERNMENT How do you convey your story using local impact data?

9 Conveying Your District’s Story Return on Investment (ROI) – focus on successes (e.g. increased graduation rates, retaining more effective teachers, partnerships with local colleges and businesses) Quantify the Results – capture positive outcomes (e.g. xxx graduating seniors received scholarships; xxx students enrolled in dual credit classes; xxx students recognized in national competitions and programs; xxx schools improved AYP)

10 Conveying Your District’s Story Prioritize needs in today’s budget climate. Include suggested solutions in your messaging (e.g. Until ESEA is reauthorized, deferring sanctions temporarily will provide a cost savings of xxx for our district, which can be redirected to funding for math and reading coaches and after school tutoring). Take advantage of alternative messaging (offer to schedule a field hearing or roundtable with students and district staff for your members of Congress; request conference calls with congressional staff if meetings are not always doable).

11 Conveying Your District’s Story Be proactive in developing a continuous rapport with congressional offices Establish yourself as a valued source of information for your members of Congress. Do not become a one-issue constituent (e.g. more funding vs. greater flexibility of existing funding, or opposing an issue vs. offering an alternative). Context matters – present salient points or discuss concerns by taking into account the factors influencing the issue (parental involvement, funding cuts, new accountability measures, etc.).

12 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress, Part I

13 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress How to have an effective meeting with your Members of Congress and their staffs. How to avoid conversation killers. Techniques can be used for group and individual meetings.

14 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress Taking Control of the Conversation  Never assume that Members of Congress or their staffs, know who you are or what you do.  Make sure you introduce yourselves and get right into the agenda.  Set the tone for the meeting.  Expect to spend no more than minutes.

15 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress Discussing the School Board’s Priority Issues  Know your Member of Congress.  Voting records –  Be passionate, but be respectful.  Keep in mind you are there to represent the official views of your school board.

16 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress Preparing for the Congressional Meeting Know…  Who is providing which information.  Who is going to cover which topic.  Who is going to take the lead during the meeting or portions of it.  Your member’s position on key educational issues, committee assignments and caucus memberships.  For information go to:

17 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress Pressing for a Firmer Commitment Do not be afraid to control the agenda. Do not hesitate to ask, “Will you support us?” You want an honest answer. You can agree to disagree.

18 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress Closing the Meeting Do’s and Don’ts for a Meeting  Know your member’s committee assignments and voting record.  Prepare in advance as a team to deliver your message.  Be on time.  Talk about the local impact.

19 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress Do’s and Don'ts (continued)  Be prepared to summarize your position in 2-3 minutes.  Ask for a commitment.  Hold your Member of Congress accountable.  Don’t guess or exaggerate.

20 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress Do’s and Don’ts (continued)  If you don’t know the answer to a question, admit it. Let the Member know that you will follow-up with an answer.  Don’t be discouraged or disrespectful if your Member of Congress can’t attend the meeting. Treat the staff member with the same respect you would the Member.

21 How to Lobby Your Members of Congress Keep in touch. Follow-up your visit with a thank you letter. Invite your member to school events back in your district or

22 Advocacy Resources

23 House of Representatives Senate April 18 – 29 May 16 – 20 June 6 – 10 July 18 – 22 August 2 – September 2 September 26 – 30 October 17 – 21 November 7 – 10 November 21 – 25 Target Adjournment - Dec 8 April 18 – 29 May 30 – June 3 July 4 – 8 August 8 – September 5 September 26 – 30 October Target Adjournment - ??? Constituent/State Work Periods

24 Advocacy Resources Meetings FRN Conference Information Weekly Legislative Highlights Advocacy Toolkit August Recess Packet Calls to Action NSBA Advocacy Website –www.nsba.org/advocacy Advocacy Training Videos

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29 AN URBAN PUBLIC EDUCATION STORY Orange County Board of Education

30 KATRINA KELLEY KATHLEEN BRANCH DEBORAH RIGSBY Questions?


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