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READING FOR INFORMATIONAL TEXT AND READING FOR LITERATURE STANDARDS 3-5 Nicole Standing RISE Educational Services.

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Presentation on theme: "READING FOR INFORMATIONAL TEXT AND READING FOR LITERATURE STANDARDS 3-5 Nicole Standing RISE Educational Services."— Presentation transcript:

1 READING FOR INFORMATIONAL TEXT AND READING FOR LITERATURE STANDARDS 3-5 Nicole Standing RISE Educational Services

2 Do you Common Core? Do you watch two shows that you are constantly comparing that have similar patterns of events, such as CSI and NCIS? 4 th grade RL 9 - Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics and patterns of events in stories, myths, and tradition literature. Did you read 2 articles or watch 2 newscasts about Flight 371 to help you form an opinion on what really happened? 5 th grade RI 6 - Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

3 English Language Arts More expository text More short passages that teach students to apply skills on diverse subject matter Students asked to make meaning from multiple texts and types of sources

4 English Language Arts Emphasis on informational and argumentative writing Speaking and listening are assessed Use of academic language a must

5 A ritualized routine has been to teach reading comprehension or literary analysis by “discussing” while reading or focusing on program identified skills and strategies. This is quite different from teaching a clean lesson from a standards based learning objective.

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9 BRAIN CONCEPTS Primacy – Recency Def: In a learning episode the brain remembers best what it hears first and second best what it hears last. Implications: -Lesson planning and delivery Retention Pyramid Def: Describes the average retention rate after 24 hours Implications: -Guided and Independent practice -Structured academic talk Repetitions Def: The brain needs on average repetitions over time for mastery. The first 6 repetitions count for 60% of the way to mastery Implications: -Independent practice -Spiral Review

10 Average Retention Rate After 24 hours Verbal Processing Verbal and Visual Processing Doing Lecture Reading Audiovisual Demonstration Discussion Group Practice by Doing Teach Others / Immediate Use of Learning 5% 10% 20% 30% 50% 75% 90% Adapted from D.Sousa – 2006: p95 Lower Retention Lower Retention Higher Retention Higher Retention

11 LESSON TYPES “Do” Emphasis on Skill ”Know” Emphasis on Concept Describe the overall structure of ideas, events, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text ELA 4 RI5 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. ELA 5 RI 1 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements. ELA 4 RL5 Describe characters in a story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. ELA 3 RL3

12 Excellent first instruction is of paramount importance, and additional instructional support is provided swiftly when needed. (CDE: Draft ELA/ELD Framework for second public review May-June 2014 Grade 2 through 3 p. 43)

13 Considerations for RL/RI Standards Must explicitly teach the RI/RL skills. Independent Practice needs to match the rigor of the standard All students need to be help accountable for demonstrating the skill. You will need multiple sources to effectively teach the standard (models, guided practice, independent practice) RLs must be taught with literature and RIs must be taught with informational text (some of the standards are very similar across the two domains) RI lessons can be taught with science and social studies text when the content has been previously taught. Most standards/lessons will still be procedural and steps can be a challenge. Some steps may be thinking steps or questioning steps.

14 ? ? GRADELEARNING OBJECTIVEINDEPENDENT PRACTICE 3-6 Analyze Idioms Write and draw your favorite idiom 3-4 Explain major differences between poems, drama and prose Complete Graphic Organizer explaining differences in poems, drama, and prose 5-6 Analyze a particular point of view reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States Analyze the point of view Lon Po Po is told from and justify using quotes from the story

15 ? ? GRADELEARNING OBJECTIVEINDEPENDENT PRACTICE 3 rd Grade RL 3 Describe characters in a story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events 4 th Grade RL 3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text 5 th Grade RL 3 Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text

16 Big Idea Define attributes of what I am to know or do (example: Setting is when and where the story takes place…) What is it? Why it important/why do we do this? “Good readers ……..” Example to create context Non example if appropriate

17 Big Idea continued… Is there a graphic organizer that I can use to more clearly illustrate definition? (example: Use a multi-flow map to describe major events using key details or describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information)

18 Make Inferences What I know + What I read/see Educated guess

19 Analyze a character based on what they say, do or think Says Does Thinks Leads me to believe the following about this character:

20 How do I Model ? Ask yourself, “How does my brain process this? How do I know what I know? How do I analyze a character when I am reading at home?” Think aloud process: Clue words I find Process/steps (thinking or processing steps “I ask myself ________”) Explain how I knew this information was important Connect to other examples Is there a graphic organizer I can use to visually illustrate this process?

21 Resources Students need multiple, accessible examples; luckily, there are many examples that students are familiar with that can be used. RL Examples: Stories read in class this year (reading book, novels) Familiar stories they know (Cinderella, Red Riding Hood) T.V. Shows/Movies (Shrek, Cars etc.) RI Examples: Science/social studies text Scholastic/time for kids Leveled readers from curriculum

22 Depth of Knowledge Questions We can incorporate rigor into our lessons by embedding multiple levels of Depth of Knowledge questions. Depth of Knowledge questions should be pre-planned and added to appropriate elements during BBDI lessons.

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24 DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE SENTENCE STEMS DOK 2 – Limited Interpretation/Application Compare______ and __________. Explain how you found the solution. How would you summarize _________. Explain how _______ affected _______. Determine a strategy for__________. What is the relationship between______ and ______? DOK 4 – Extended Explain the problem, the different solution paths, solve the problem using at least two paths and report the results. Create a plan for ________ using this principle_________. Justify your method for solving this scenario, hypothesize how an expert in another field would approach the solution. What information can you gather to support your idea about_________? Devise a way to________________. DOK 1 – Basic recall Identify ______. What is the formula for________? List the ___________ in order. How would you describe _________? Recall __________? Describe_________. Name the __________. DOK 3 – Strategic Interpretation/Application Explain why the solution given is wrong/right and why. Describe a different method to come to the same conclusion. What was the effectiveness of the ______? Explain your reasoning using one other source. What would happen if______? Can you formulate a theory for__________? Best used :

25 DOK 2: What is the relationship between the character’s response and the next event in a story? DOK 3: What would happen to the story if the character did ______ instead of __________?

26 What DOK question could you ask the students? What level is it and what stem/frame would you use?

27 1. Pose the question to make all students accountable 2. Pause to allow time for all students to develop an answer 3. Process to build language and develop soft skills 4. Pick a non-volunteer Steps for Checking for Understanding at Key Points in a Lesson

28 When do I use close reading? “Explicitly teaching students to use strategies that good readers use, such as drawing on background knowledge and creating graphic organizers to gain control of the macrostructure of a text, improves comprehension” (Biancarosa and Snow 2006; Underwood and Pearson 2004) ELA/ELD Framework May-June 2014 pg 52

29 Close Reading Strategies to support literacy Should be taught the first time utilizing BBDI Should be incorporated into layered activities Can be used as a step in a standards based lesson The skill to access the text Reading for Information and Reading for Literature Standards Skills that students need to be successful in real world scenarios as represented on the SBAC Should be taught through BBDI Includes multiple text examples for guided and independent practice The skill you are going to be able to do after reading

30 When it is a text that warrants a close read When the content knowledge is being emphasized When utilizing the strategy will assist the student in applying a skill (standard) When should I use close reading?

31 Will it be used to teach subsequent lessons? The day before Is it something the students can do to elaborately rehearse the knowledge given the OWLs? Guided Practice Does it allow the students to demonstrate their knowledge of the learning objective? Independent Practice When should I use my reading?

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33 Objective Analyze the similarities and differences in multiple accounts of the same event or topic.

34 Review Boston Massacre Boston Tea Party Trail of Tears/Indian Removal Slavery

35 Big Idea Good readers pay attention to the point of view that is being portrayed in a report on an event or topic. This helps us to analyze the information in order to make informed decisions about our opinion regarding the event or topic.

36 Trail of Tears Article II: Cherokee Chief John Ross in a protest letter to the U.S. Congress, 1836 “Little did [the American Indians] anticipate, that when taught to think and feel as the American citizen, and to have with him a common interest, they were to be despoiled [stripped of their possessions] by their guardian, to become strangers and wanderers in the land of their fathers, forced to return to the savage life, and to seek a new home in the wilds of the far west, and that without their consent.” Article I: President Jackson’s Message to Congress ‘On Indian Removal’ (1830) “It gives me pleasure to announce to Congress that the benevolent policy of the Government, steadily pursued for nearly thirty years, in relation to the removal of the Indians beyond the white settlements is approaching to a happy consummation. It will separate the Indians from immediate contacts with settlements of whites; free them from the power of the States; enable them to pursue happiness in their own way and under their own rude institutions; will slow the progress of decay which is lessening their numbers, and perhaps cause them gradually, under the protection of the Government and through the influence of good counsels, to cast off their savage habits and become an interesting, civilized, and Christian community.”

37 The Author is: Relationship: Reason: The viewpoints in these articles are similar because______________________. The viewpoints in these articles are different because______________________. President Andrew Jackson Protest to Congress Participant – directly affected by policy Persuade Congress of the benefits of the policy Participant; policy-maker Cherokee Chief John Ross they refer to the same policy they have completely different perspectives on the outcomes of the policy. Topic: Indian Removal

38 Steps 1. Read the first article and map out point of view thinking questions: 1. Who wrote it? 2. What was their affiliation? (observer/participant) 3. Reason for writing it 2. Read the second article and map out point of view thinking questions 3. Ask yourself, “How are their viewpoints the same?” 4. Ask yourself, “How are their viewpoints different?”

39 The Author is: Relationship: Reason: The viewpoints in these articles are similar because______________________. The viewpoints in these articles are different because______________________. Samuel Cooper Provide an account of the events of the Boston Tea Party Observer; journalist Give an account of the events of the Boston Tea Party Eyewitness Thomas & John Fleet they both claim to be unbiased observers but hint at their approval of the event. Fleet concludes with a clear opinion in favor of the event. Event: Boston Tea Party

40 The Author is: Relationship: Reason: Journalist from the Boston Gazette Tell his side; provide a justification for his actions Participant Inform the public Observer (possibly secondhand) Captain Preston Event: Boston Massacre

41 The viewpoints in these articles are similar because _____________________. The viewpoints in these articles are different because ______________________.

42 The Author is: Relationship: Reason: Protest slavery Participant (English Colonist) Describe the treatment of slaves Participant (slave) Samuel Sewall Olaudah Equiano Topic: Slavery

43 The viewpoints in these articles are similar because _____________________. The viewpoints in these articles are different because ______________________.

44 Closure 1. What did we learn in this lesson? 2. Why do good readers analyze viewpoint? 3. What are the steps to analyze viewpoint when looking at articles about the same event or topic?

45 The Author is: Relationship: Reason:

46 I came to work this morning and realized Katie had forgotten to bring her coffee. I wonder if she was in a hurry. Katie got to work this morning and realized that she had forgotten her coffee. Then she realized she must have packed it in Jake’s lunch!

47 Objective Determine the point of view from which different stories are narrated.

48 Review Point of View – a position (perspective) from which something is observed Pronoun – a word that takes the place of a noun (I, my, his, her, she, he)

49 Big Idea Different stories are narrated from different points of view. This allows the author to give the reader a look at the thoughts and feelings of just one character, or many of the characters. 1 st Person One character’s perspective Reader only sees what that character sees 3 rd Person Outsider’s perspective Reader knows what’s going on with all characters Tells perspective 1 st Person Clue Words (excluding dialogue) I Me My 3 rd Person Clue Words (excluding dialogue) He She They

50 1 st Person One character’s perspective Reader only sees what that character sees 3 rd Person Outsider’s perspective Reader knows what’s going on with all characters Tells perspective Perspective: 3 rd Person Lunch Money is narrated in 3 rd Person because it gives the perspectives of all of the characters.

51 Steps 1. Read the passage. 2. Ask myself, “Does the narrator appear to be inside or outside of the story?” 3. Circle the clue words (excluding dialogue) to help you decide. 4. Write a sentence explaining your choice and justify.

52 1 st Person One character’s perspective Reader only sees what that character sees 3 rd Person Outsider’s perspective Reader knows what’s going on with all characters Tells perspective Perspective: 1 st Person Ella Enchanted is narrated in 1 st person because it is from Ella’s perspective only.

53 1 st Person One character’s perspective Reader only sees what that character sees 3 rd Person Outsider’s perspective Reader knows what’s going on with all characters Tells perspective Perspective: 3 rd Person Wayside School is Falling Down is written in 3 rd person because it is narrated from an outsider’s perspective.

54 1 st Person One character’s perspective Reader only sees what that character sees 3 rd Person Outsider’s perspective Reader knows what’s going on with all characters Tells perspective Perspective: 3 rd Person James & the Giant Peach is written in 3 rd person because it is narrated from an outsider’s perspective.

55 1 st Person One character’s perspective Reader only sees what that character sees 3 rd Person Outsider’s perspective Reader knows what’s going on with all characters Tells perspective Perspective: 1 st Person Diary of a Wimpy Kid is written in 1 st person because it is narrated from one character’s perspective.

56 What was our objective? What are the different Points of View we compared today? How do we know which Point of View is being used in a story?

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