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ENGAGING AND DIVERSIFYING AUDIENCES IN THE RI ARTS/CULTURE SECTOR A suggested logic model for Daniel Kertzner August 17, 2011 Peggy Chang.

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Presentation on theme: "ENGAGING AND DIVERSIFYING AUDIENCES IN THE RI ARTS/CULTURE SECTOR A suggested logic model for Daniel Kertzner August 17, 2011 Peggy Chang."— Presentation transcript:

1 ENGAGING AND DIVERSIFYING AUDIENCES IN THE RI ARTS/CULTURE SECTOR A suggested logic model for Daniel Kertzner August 17, 2011 Peggy Chang

2 Issue/Problem  Arts/culture attendance in traditional, “mainstream” venues has decreased, locally and nationally (NEA’s 2008 Beyond Attendance report).NEA’s 2008 Beyond Attendance report  Smaller, culturally-specific arts/culture nonprofits are especially vulnerable in this volatile economy.

3 Issue/Problem  Arts & culture suffers from the public perception that our programs/events/services are nice but not vital (Arts Ripple Effect).Arts Ripple Effect  Also suffers from the perception that these experiences are primarily for the social elite and not for us all (José Abreu speaking about El Sistema).El Sistema

4 Issue/Problem  Audiences in mainstream venues don’t match current national demographics (Demographic Information and the Future of Museums, Irvine Foundation’s new arts strategy, NEA 2008 report referenced earlier)Demographic Information and the Future of MuseumsIrvine Foundation’s new arts strategy  Youth aren’t getting arts in the public school curriculum and very little exposure outside of popular culture, e.g., TV, internet, radio (see “Building Youth Participation” by Betty Farrell in Entering Cultural Communities: Diversity and Change in the Nonprofit Arts)

5 NEA Report’s Policy Questions  With limited resources, what should be the priorities?  How do we understand the public value generated from different types of arts participation?  How do we understand the relationship between the instrumental benefits of arts participation, such as community building, and the intrinsic benefits stemming from support for individual creative and artistic expression and engagement?”

6 RIF Goal & Desired Outcome Stimulate a sector-wide commitment to audience development, and state-wide support for greater access to quality arts/culture experiences for all Rhode Islanders.

7 Assumptions / Beliefs / Context  Demographics are changing at the national and local level—attracting diverse audiences is not only the right thing to do, it’s a matter of survival (Demographic Information and the Future of Museums).Demographic Information and the Future of Museums

8 Assumptions / Beliefs / Context  Nationally, arts creation/personal practice is significant for people of all ages (Beyond Attendance referenced earlier & Philadelphia’s Cultural Engagement Index).Philadelphia’s Cultural Engagement Index  Technology is playing a role in engaging more people in arts creation/curation/interpretation.

9 Assumptions / Beliefs / Context  Rhode Island / Providence has several vibrant after-school programs (CMW, NUA, AS220, RISD, teaching artists).  Studies show that parents value arts experiences for their children (Wallace Foundation’s Engaging Audiences report).Engaging Audiences

10 Strategies / Inputs / Available Resources / Planning  Name and define indicators for arts/culture engagement.  Gather existing data on local arts participation and research on benefits of arts/culture participation & education.  Identify and meet with strategic partners—RIF education sector, RISCA, RICH, schools/school department, other regional foundations, potential national and individual donors.

11 Areas of Focus / Activities / Products & Services 1. Establish the learning community for the sector about audience development/engagement (workshops, list of resources/online communities, EAP; like Engage 2020 Leadership Program).Engage 2020 Leadership Program 2. Support development and implementation of shared data management systems for RIF & arts/culture nonprofits.

12 Areas of Focus / Activities / Products & Services 3. Offer grants focused on developing & implementing audience engagement strategies:  Innovative uses of technology (e.g., Brooklyn Museum, Chicago Sinfonietta cell phone performance, San Francisco Symphony Kids site)Brooklyn MuseumChicago Sinfonietta cell phone performanceSan Francisco Symphony Kids site  Arts/culture in public/non-traditional spaces (e.g., FirstWorks/NEA grant for Providence, Trey McIntyre Project)Trey McIntyre Project  Culturally-specific audience engagement efforts and programs in mainstream organizations (e.g., Monterey Bay Aquarium & all case studies in Demographic Information and the Future of Museums referenced earlier)  Family programs—free days (Walker Arts Center), kid-friendly programs (Art Sparks at the Speed Museum)Walker Arts CenterArt Sparks at the Speed Museum  Viewing rehearsals / audience participation in process of arts creation  Arts creation (Yerba Buena Center for the Arts’s The Big Ideas &Yerba Buena Center for the Arts’s The Big Ideas YBCA: YOUYBCA: YOU)

13 Areas of Focus / Activities / Products & Services 4. Support activities to stimulate youth arts participation:  Convene stakeholders/create think tank about arts education to better understand our assets and collective priorities in this area.  Offer grants for nonprofit-public school partnerships (e.g., the the Gamm  Offer grants for programs targeting teens (e.g., Seattle Arts Museum, Whitney, Interchange; see Entering Cultural Communities: Diversity and Challenge in the Nonprofit Arts, Chp. 5 “Building Youth Participation”)Seattle Arts MuseumWhitneyInterchange

14 Areas of Focus/Activities/Products & Services 5. Grants for public service / civic engagement programs:   The Mobile Unit at the Public The Mobile Unit

15 Outputs/Results: size & scope of products/services  Local, sector-wide knowledge of the nationwide trends and conversation amongst Artistic/Executive Directors and others (learning community)  More capacity for nonprofits to chart progress/self-report (data collection)

16 Outputs/Results: size & scope of products/services  More sector-wide capacity to attract and engage diverse audiences in meaningful ways  More np capacity to use technology/social media that encourages audience reflection and audience-artist dialogue  Uptick in np event attendance in three-year period

17 Outputs/Results: size & scope of products/services  More np capacity to integrate arts/culture with youth learning (arts education & civic engagement)  More youth have access to quality arts/culture in wider world (arts education)  New mutually-beneficial partnerships between nps, public schools, city/state, etc.

18 ST outcomes/public attitudes  From the sector: We can do this, we should do this; we’re committed to audience development and ensuring access for all RIers for the long term  Nonprofit programming more appealing to broader audiences (evidenced by surveys and interviews)— attention paid to diversity, interactivity & relevance  Widely-held belief that arts/culture is vital to our well-being, and that we should advocate for its support (evidenced by commentaries, blog posts)

19 LT outcomes / community-wide or systemic change  Mainstream and culturally-specific organizations attract and engage new audiences that are reflective of RI demographically  RI youth regardless of socio-economic background have access to quality art/culture experiences that are frequent and significant to them—through their school curriculum, or via after-school programs  Schools have sustained their capacity to offer arts/culture educational experiences via np partnerships

20 LT outcomes / community-wide or systemic change  Majority of the public supports the arts/culture via frequent participation and donations  Greater %age of public funding goes toward the arts

21 What are the engagement indicators?  Ticket sales/visits/membership—numbers, demographic information  Frequency and salience of experience for audience member / visitor; reporting of experience as a meaningful opportunity (intrinsic impact indicators)intrinsic impact indicators

22 What are the engagement indicators?  Ongoing dialogue between artists and audience, amongst audience members— via web? (see “Community” on Brooklyn Museum site; also YBCA: YOU)see “Community” on Brooklyn Museum site  Arts creation—via web? (see “Kids” on Whitney Museum site; also SF Symphony)see “Kids” on Whitney Museum site

23 Measurement Tools  In-venue surveys, online surveys, interviews  Monterey Bay Aquarium (see ed survey)  Intrinsic Impact.org Intrinsic Impact.org  OK A+ schools (surveys & interviews)—important to partner with university school of education or public policy? OK A+ schools

24 Concrete, Sector-Wide Benchmarks  Double audience participation by 2022 (like Engage 2020).  Audiences reflect demographics of RI (like Irvine Foundation strategy, Chicago).Irvine Foundation strategyChicago  Measure of increased exposure to arts/culture for youth (like Boston Public Schools Arts Expansion Initiative, Chicago Teaching Artists Report).Boston Public Schools Arts Expansion Initiative

25 Intermediary Steps  Determine scope & scale of effort for RI or collective  Create framework/brand; align grant making  Identify good, local examples of audience engagement  Establish research/assessment methodology to track progress and attract additional funding  Establish communications strategy (like Irvine)  Coordinate arts education efforts with RIF education sector priorities


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